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Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition

Reaffirming our commitment to carbon pricing and climate action

Catherine McKenna's picture
Second Annual Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition High-Level Assembly. Photo: World Bank


When the world united around the historic Paris climate agreement, in 2015, the message was clear: It’s unfair to pass the burden of climate change to future generations.

We now need to put words into action. This week, leaders from 20 of the largest economies are meeting in Hamburg to find solutions to global challenges. Climate change will be front and center.

As the co-chairs of the Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition (CPLC), we want to accelerate climate action and reaffirm our commitment to carbon pricing. The discussions in Germany are a great opportunity to keep the momentum going.
 
Launched during the Paris climate talks, the CPLC now consists of 30 governments and over 140 businesses, all fighting for a common cause: to advocate for the pricing of carbon emissions across the world. We are calling for bold leadership from everyone – governments, companies, academia and civil society. The CPLC provides a forum for these groups to show collaborative leadership on carbon pricing.

Making the links between carbon markets in a post-Paris world

Thomas Kansy's picture



We are witnessing a pivotal moment in a decades-long effort to combat climate change. Last year in Paris, world leaders came together for the first time to commit to keeping global warming below 2°C. With the Paris Agreement in force and negotiators at COP22 in Marrakesh teasing out the details of implementing the Agreement, countries are developing their action plans (or Nationally Determined Contributions, NDCs) to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. Part of this is looking at how carbon assets could be traded across borders.

Québec earmarks carbon-market revenues to stir innovation

David Heurtel's picture
Electric school bus. Photo credit: Autobus Lion

By advancing towards our ambitious GHG reduction target – 37,5 % of 1990 levels in 2030 – Québec demonstrates that proactive States and Regions are part of the solution to fight climate change. To address this challenge, we have decided to set up a carbon market linked with California through the Western Climate Initiative in 2014. In 2017, our carbon market will also be linked with Ontario. Last August, Québec and Mexico signed a joint statement to affirm their desire to widen their collaboration on cap-and-trade. Jurisdictions have many options when it comes to earmark their carbon-pricing revenues; Quebec’s choice, to entirely reinvest the revenues of its carbon market in climate actions, shows that we really understand the urgency of acting immediately and boldly. Thanks to CPLC’s leadership and knowledge-sharing initiatives, we now have an additional opportunity to share our stories and learn from each-other’s experiences with carbon pricing.

As the Paris Agreement becomes reality: How to transform economies through carbon pricing

Laura Tuck's picture


The remarkable pace at which nations of the world have ratified the Paris Agreement on climate change gives us all hope. It signals the world is ready to take the actions we need to keep global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius. We know, however, that delivering on Paris comes with a high price tag, and that we need to help countries not just transition toward renewable energy but unlock the finance needed to get there.

Amid the enormous challenge ahead, I want to emphasize the transformative economic opportunity that putting a price on carbon pollution presents.

Delivering on the Paris agreement: Is there a carbon pricing opportunity for India?

Thomas Kerr's picture
Photo: Simone D. McCourtie / World Bank


Negotiators in Paris last December achieved a previously unattainable consensus among all countries — large and small, industrialized and developing — on a target for minimizing climate change.
 
They agreed to hold planetary warming to below 2 degrees Celsius, which can only happen by drastically cutting the greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change.
 
Adhering to the target requires a de facto energy revolution that transforms economies and societies by weaning the world from dependence on fossil fuels. The magnitude of the task means strategies and spending on a scale far exceeding previous efforts. 

Faster track to better carbon prices

Grzegorz Peszko's picture
Carbon pricing instruments implemented or scheduled for implementation,
with sectoral coverage and GHG emissions covered.


​Many of my compatriots in Poland, where over 90 percent of power generation comes from burning coal, are concerned that the EU climate policy is a risky outlier.

​They worry that the EU Emissions Trading System may expose domestic industry to unfair competitition and cause companies to move production to countries where emission costs are lower, something called “leakage”.

The two reports recently released by the World Bank may change this perception.

Putting a price on carbon, one jurisdiction at a time

Thomas Kerr's picture
CPLC Design Meeting at World Bank Group Headquarters
Credits: Max Thabiso Edkins


This week, the World Bank Group released the latest version of our annual State and Trends of Carbon Pricing report. It reports that today,39 nations and 23 cities, states or regions are using a carbon price.

​This represents the equivalent of about 7 billion tons of carbon dioxide, or 12 percent of annual global greenhouse gas emissions.

CEO: We are moving away from the fossil age

Feike Sijbesma's picture
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Feike Sijbesma is CEO of Royal DSM, a health, nutrition, and materials company that has evolved from its original purpose (it was established by the Dutch government in 1902 to mine coal) into a science-based company that develops sustainable materials. It takes its name from the original Nederlandse Staatsmijnen, or Dutch State Mines.


“I think, first of all, we need to agree that climate change is real.