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Climate Investment Funds: The quiet motor behind our most impactful climate investments

John Roome's picture

It does not happen often that one of the finest actors of our time tweets about a World Bank supported project and invites all his fans to have a look at the impressive pictures taken from space. In fact, I can’t remember having seen that before.
 
But this is what Oscar winner and climate activist Leonardo DiCaprio did a few months ago when the Noor Concentrated Solar Plant (CSP) in Morocco—the largest CSP plant in the world - was opened. Once finalized, in two years, it will provide clean energy to 1.1 million households. I visited the plant two weeks ago and it is truly an impressive site. The indirect benefits of the project might even be larger: it has advanced an important and innovative technology, it has driven down costs of CSP, and it holds important lessons for how public and private sectors can work together in the future.
 
I am proud that the World Bank, jointly with the African Development Bank and a number of foreign investors, supported this cutting-edge solar energy project. But it was made possible thanks to the Climate Investment Funds (CIF), which put in US$435 million to “de-risk” the investment, playing an essential role to kickstart the deal. 

Le rideau se lève sur la plus grande centrale solaire à concentration du monde

Mafalda Duarte's picture
Also available in: English

Also available in: العربية

 Banque mondiale
Avec une capacité de 500 MW, d'ici 2018 la centrale thermoélectrique de Noor-Ouarzazate devrait fournir de l'électricité à 1,1 million de Marocains. Photo: Banque mondiale


Si vous n’avez jamais entendu parler de l’énergie solaire concentrée, sachez que cette technologie est promise à un bel avenir. Moins connu que d’autres sources d’énergie renouvelable, elle n’en possède pas moins un fort potentiel de développement : selon l'Agence internationale de l’énergie, le CSP (pour concentrated solar power) pourrait être à l’origine de 11 % de la production mondiale d’électricité d’ici 2050. 
 
C’est une révolution qui s’annonce, qui placera les pays émergents et en développement du monde entier sur la voie d’une croissance sobre en carbone. Et le Maroc en a pris la tête : cette semaine, le roi Mohamed VI inaugure officiellement la première phase de ce qui sera à terme la plus grande centrale solaire à concentration du monde — le futur complexe de Noor s’étendra sur une superficie égale à celle de Rabat, la capitale marocaine.
 
En collaboration avec la Banque mondiale et la Banque africaine de développement, les Fonds d’investissement climatiques (FIC) ont déjà fourni 435 millions de dollars en faveur de ce complexe solaire dont le développement se déroulera en trois phases.

Drum roll…Presenting the world’s largest concentrated solar power plant!

Mafalda Duarte's picture
Also available in: Français

Also available in: العربية | Spanish

Noor concentrated solar power plant is expected to supply 1.1 million of Moroccans with 500 MW of power by 2018. Photo: World Bank


Concentrated Solar Power is the greatest energy technology you have probably never heard of.  While it may not be as widely known as other renewable energy sources, there’s no doubting its potential - the International Energy Agency estimates that up to 11 percent of the world’s electricity generation in 2050 could come from CSP.  

And this week in Morocco, the King, His Majesty Mohammed VI, is officially opening the first phase of what will eventually be the largest CSP plant in the world – the same size as Morocco’s capital city Rabat.  I congratulate Morocco for taking a leadership role that has placed it on the frontlines of a revolution that is bringing low-carbon development to emerging and developing economies worldwide.
 
In collaboration with the World Bank and the African Development Bank, the CIF has already provided US$435 million into this three-phase Noor CSP complex in Morocco.

Bringing better biodigesters and clean energy to Africa

Juha Seppala's picture
In developing countries, biodigesters are becoming an incredibly effective solution to convert manure into biogas. Photo: SimGas


Sub-Saharan Africa continues to suffer from a major energy deficit, with hundreds of millions of people lacking access to electricity and clean cooking fuels. There is a great need for innovative mechanisms that can help families access clean and affordable energy. The Carbon Initiative for Development (Ci-Dev) is one such mechanism.  
 
A $125 million fund with a pipeline of 14 pilot projects in Africa, Ci-Dev will help improve living standards and sustainable energy through results-based finance. Along the way, it will generate valuable lessons in how reducing greenhouse gas emissions can generate tangible development benefits for local communities, like cleaner air, improved safety, and financial and time savings.

These lessons can help in the delivery and scale up of innovative climate finance business models.

The trillion dollar challenge

Abhishek Bhaskar's picture

 

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), full implementation of countries’ submitted pledges for low-carbon development will require USD 13.5 trillion in investments in energy efficiency and low-carbon technologies from 2015 to 2030.  That’s almost USD 1 trillion every year. This means all hands need to be on the deck if the global community is to address one of the biggest development challenges of our times.

Marching forward: China is creating the world’s largest market-based carbon pricing system

Vikram Widge's picture
China – the world largest emitter of greenhouse gases – is implementing a national carbon market in 2017

During his visit to Washington last week, China’s President Xi Jinping confirmed that the world’s largest greenhouse gas emitter, which has pledged to reduce its carbon intensity and reach a peak of overall emissions by 2030, will use a cap-and-trade market approach to help realize this. 
 
China already has 7 pilot markets in cities and provinces in place that cover 1 billion tons of greenhouse gas emissions annually. Under the national scheme, now to go live in 2017, this could increase to 4 billion tons according to Chinese researchers - making it the world’s largest national emissions trading system.

It’s an exciting step and demonstration of China’s commitment to achieve its low carbon goals. 

Energizing our green future

Mafalda Duarte's picture
The CIF is a leader in driving global investments in CSP


​As world leaders come together at the UN General Assembly to adopt new sustainable development goals, climate change activists gear up for Climate Week in New York City and the Pope brings his message to the United Nations, a shared vision of our future is coming into clear focus. 

If we are to eradicate poverty, we need to tackle climate change.  And since 2008, the $8.1 billion Climate Investment Funds (CIF) has been showing it is possible for countries to pursue sustainable development in a way that does just that.

Statoil CEO: We know carbon pricing actually works

Eldar Sætre's picture
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Eldar Sætre is president and CEO of Statoil. He was one of six oil and gas company CEOs who issued a joint call to governments around the world on June 1 to put a price on carbon.      

"Statoil has for some years called for a price on carbon because we know that carbon pricing actually works. If more governments put a price on carbon, other businesses will follow suit and quickly.

Sweden: Decoupling GDP growth from CO2 emissions is possible

Magdalena Andersson and Isabella Lövin's picture
 Decoupling growth from emissions in Sweden


By Magdalena Andersson, Minister for Finance, Sweden
and Isabella Lövin, Minister for International Development Cooperation, Sweden


Sweden is proud to join forces with Sustainable Energy for All (SE4All), convening in New York this week. Energy is one of the most decisive issues of our age. Without secure access to energy, we won’t achieve real and lasting poverty reduction. Without the expansion of clean energy, we won’t be able to stop climate change.  

With business as usual and no significant carbon emission cuts, we have only 15 years left before we have emitted enough CO2 to make this planet more than 2 degrees warmer. Then we will see a dramatic increase in droughts, floods, storms and species extinction – and we will have changed the conditions for every generation to come. And we know that it is the poorest who will be hit the hardest by the effects of climate change.

This is not a political statement but a scientific one. Fifteen years left.

So we must start changing our energy systems, going from fossil to renewable, now.

CEO: Why Europe’s largest energy companies support carbon pricing

Gérard Mestrallet's picture
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Gérard Mestrallet is chairman and CEO of ENGIE, formerly GDF Suez. He spoke at the World Bank Group about his company's support for carbon pricing and the involvement of Europe's energy companies in reinvigorating the EU's emissions trading system. 
 

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