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Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs)

Latin America and the Caribbean: seizing a trillion dollar opportunity in climate investments

Christian Grossmann's picture
 Alessandra Bazan Testino / IFC
Green-bond supported wind farm in Penonome, Panama. Photo credit: Alessandra Bazan Testino / IFC 


First published by Capital Finance International.

Soon the world will celebrate the one-year anniversary of the historic climate agreement signed in Paris in December 2015. The agreement will be implemented through country-led greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction commitments known as their intended Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), which to date have been submitted by 189 countries covering 95 percent of global GHG emissions. 
 
Apart from signaling concrete commitments, these reduction targets also offer a clear signpost of the investment direction countries need to follow as the global economy steers towards a low-carbon, climate-resilient pathway. Estimates point to between $57 trillion and $93 trillion in new low-carbon, climate resilient infrastructure investment by 2030.[1] How developing countries evaluate and respond to their infrastructure needs will greatly determine their ability to meet GHG reduction commitments.

中国追寻新的发展之路

Xueman Wang's picture
Also available in: English
天津城市景观, 摄影:杨爱军 / 世界银行

在巴黎气候变化大会召开之前,180多个国家提交了有关走低碳发展之路的国家气候预案。

国家自主贡献预案主要包括到2025年或2030年之前计划实施的减排目标,但这些预案不仅仅是关于数字的,其中很多预案、特别是发展中国家提交的预案还提出了在国家整体发展框架内的气候行动,也包括适应行动。这并不令人吃惊,因为归根结底,应对气候变化就是关于有效地管理国家经济的。

这显然也是中国的情况。

China: in pursuit of a new development pathway

Xueman Wang's picture
Also available in: 中文
City landscape, Tianjin, China. Photo: Yang Aijun / World Bank


More than 180 countries have submitted their intended national climate plans to get on a low-carbon development pathway ahead of COP21 climate talks, now underway in Paris.

Called the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs), most include mitigation targets to be implemented by 2025 or 2030. But these plans are not just about numbers. Many of them, particularly those put forward by developing countries, also propose climate actions within the countries’ overall development framework, including adaptation. Hardly surprising, as after all, tackling climate change is about effectively managing a country’s economy.

​This certainly seems to be the case for China.