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The WDR 2011 Flip Challenge!

Nicholas van Praag's picture

Ten cameras…six months…192 countries…thousands of highly committed staff and consultants...the easiest, most user friendly camera available.  The challenge?  To get eye-witness reports on how conflict and violence affects people throughout the world. 

   

WDR 2011 Flip Challenge!

Think of it as a relay race, or the game of “hot potato,” only what you are holding is far hotter than an imaginary hot potatoit is the voice of one person who hopes to be heard.

The WDR Flip Challenge is part of the World Development Report 2011, on conflict, violence, and development.  Like every report, it will be full of data, analysis, and suggestions for action. But all of these are built on one thingthe human story.  We aren’t looking for stories about Bank programs or interviews with experts. 

What we want are the people on the ground, the people who know about conflict and violence because they experience it in their own lives.  Or they never experience it, and that’s a story as well! It is these stories that tell us why we should care about an issue, that compel us to feel empathy and to act.  These are the stories we want to hear.

The rules for the WDR Flip Challenge are simple.  Get a camera, register, film, upload, and pass it on.  You don’t need to be a proour guidelines will walk you through everything you need to know. 

You can send us raw footage, or if you want to get fancy, you can use the flip site to edit, add sound effects, and whatever other bells and whistles you like.  All that is required is some curiosity and a desire to make sure everyone’s voice is heard.

If you are interested in participating, please contact us at wdrflip2011@worldbank.org 

SAMPLE CLIP:


Prevention is better than post-conflict catch-up

Nicholas van Praag's picture
   An end to conflict conformism

Violence is the antithesis of development.  It tears down what’s been built up.  It destroys lives, shortens horizons, and inflicts huge psychological and physical pain.

Once violence ends, it takes a generation, on average, to get back to square oneand that’s only when strife does not reignite or morph into other forms of man-on-man beastliness, as often happens. 

No wonder so many people at the Millennium Development Goals summit in New York this week are taking a hard look at how to improve the often nasty, brutish and short lives of people living in states wracked by violence. 

At a side event organized by the WDR and the International Dialogue on Peace Building, and co-hosted by Timor Leste and the UK, Andrew Mitchell, Britain’s aid chief, reminded us that no fragile state or conflict-affected country has yet achieved a single MDG. Most lag 40 to 60 percent behind other low and middle-income countries in MDG attainment.

If you were born without a birth attendant or lack access to clean water or never went to primary school or go to bed hungry, the chances are pretty high (between 65 and 75 percent, depending on the indicator) that you come from a country mired in or emerging from violence.

With more than 1.5 billion people living in conflict-affected countries, the challenge is daunting.  There’s no chance of coming close to attaining the MDGs at the global level unless we move from bumper-sticker aspiration to policy action in fragile states.

From Aceh to Haiti - Recovery is possible

Natalia Cieslik's picture

Joachim von Amsberg, the World Bank's country director for Indonesia, published an interesting op-ed in today’s Washington Post: Out of Aceh's experience, hope for rebuilding Haiti.  Despite the many differences between these two conflict-affected countries, he draws lessons from post-tsunami Aceh for a possible recovery in Haiti. “Local and national leadership count," he writes, "and empowering people is key.  In Aceh, strong top-down leadership was complemented by the empowerment of the people and communities. Victims became development workers. Aid recipients and former combatants became community facilitators. Displaced families became workers who rebuilt their houses. By channeling a large share of reconstruction funds directly to communities, the people of Aceh's problems were transformed as they became part of the solution. Their hard work meant that houses were built faster, at a lower cost, and better met the needs of the people.”

Haiti Family
    Photo © 'Paul Jeffrey'


 
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World Development Report 2011—Not a Cookbook

Nigel Roberts's picture

Many leaders and practitioners familiar with the challenges of delivering in fragile and conflict-affected states are urging us to come up with practical suggestions for them. We in the WDR Team feel we have to be careful not try and develop some set of 'conflict recipes', though: this would mean falling into the trap that characterizes a lot of institutional development work by external parties (i.e. that it is based on prescriptive models and is insufficiently adapted to real-life situations of fragility and conflict). Rather than a cookbook, then, we are shooting for an approach that shares insights and experiences from all types of situations, and points to those that have worked well and could prove useful elsewhere.

For a summary of the purpose and content of the upcoming World Development Report 2011, please take a look at my video:

WDR 2011 - Not a Cookbook from World Bank on Vimeo.