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Dataviz

This page is a collection of data visualizations from the World Bank using open data.

Chart: Higher Poverty Rates for Latin America's Indigenous

Tariq Khokhar's picture

Indigenous people in Latin America account for less than 8% of the population, yet make up more than 17% of the region's extremely poor, due to a persistent pattern of social exclusion. Read More and download the report "Indigenous Latin America in the twenty-first century"
 

Chart: Pakistan Leads South Asia in Mobile Money

Tariq Khokhar's picture

In 2014, an average of 3% of people in South Asia used a mobile phone to send or receive money. While there are still gaps between how often men and women use these services, Pakistan leads the region with 9% of men and 2% of women moving money on their mobiles. You can find more data on financial inclusion in the Global Findex Database
 

Chart: By 2030, Delhi’s Population Will Approach Tokyo’s

Tariq Khokhar's picture
According to the UN's World Urbanization Prospects, by 2030, the world is projected to have 41 mega-cities with more than 10 million inhabitants each. Tokyo is expected to remain the world’s largest city in 2030, followed closely by Delhi. The fastest-growing cities will be in Asia and Africa.

But what exactly is a city?

Chandan Deuskar's blog explores exactly this question. There's currently no standard definition of an "urban area" or "urban population" - each country relies on its own definition and collects data accodringly. This is an important area of data to improve - the Sustainable Development Goals include many indicators and targets explicity concerning cities and new standards and approaches such as using satellite imagery may provide more accurate data and definitions. 
 

Chart: the future price of oil?

Tariq Khokhar's picture

The World Bank's forecast for the average oil price in 2016 is $37 per barrel. Commodity Markets Outlook provides a quarterly analysis of international commodity markets, and the oil forecast reflects factors including a slowing global economy, high oil inventories and unchanged OPEC policy prioritizing market share.
 

Chart: $1 Trillion in Telecom Investment since 1990

Tariq Khokhar's picture

Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) bring together the private sector and governments to provide public infrastructure. The total investment in infrastructure was $25.3 billion in the first half of 2015. The PPP Knowledge Lab brings together data and reports on these projects.

Latin America's unemployed and out of school youth

Tariq Khokhar's picture


Throughout Latin America, youth who are neither working nor in school are often labeled ninis, from the Spanish phrase “ni estudia ni trabaja" (neither studies nor works). One in five youth in the region is a nini, and the increase in their number since 1992 has been entirely due to young men. Read more in the new paper: "Out of School and Out of Work : Risk and Opportunities for Latin America’s Ninis"
 

Four charts on gender gaps we still need to close

Tariq Khokhar's picture

The World Bank Group has just launched a new gender data portal that brings together sex-disaggregated and gender-relevant data on topics ranging from education, demographics, and health to jobs, asset ownership, and political participation. We’ve also just released the Little Data Book on Gender 2016 along with online tables that are linked to the latest data available in the World Development Indicators

Gender data are one of the most visited parts of our data site, and these new resources make it easier than ever to see our data’s gender dimensions. The country and topic dashboards give an overview of the distribution and trends in data across important themes, and the online tables and book are a useful reference for the most commonly accessed data. 

Below I’ve picked a few charts from the new portal related to the four pillars of the Bank Group’s new gender equality strategy. These aims focus on improving human endowments, through better access to health, education, and social protection; opening up more and better jobs by tackling issues such as skills gaps and care arrangements; expanding women’s access to and control over assets;  and enhancing women’s voice and agency, meaning their ability to make themselves heard and exert control over key aspects of their own lives.
 

(Almost) middle class

Oscar Calvo-González's picture

The group of Latin Americans still vulnerable to fall back into poverty has moved tantalizingly close to middle class status in the past decade. The so-called vulnerable, who have escaped poverty but have not yet made it to the middle class, remain the largest socio-economic group in Latin America. In fact, their share of the population increased slightly (38 percent in 2013, up from 35 percent in 2003). But, importantly, their living conditions improved significantly in the same period. The incomes of the vulnerable are today much closer to those of the middle class – even if their growth in incomes was not enough to cross over to the middle class.

Source: SEDLAC (World Bank and CEDLAS). Note: The curves report the kernel density estimate of the logarithm of family per capita income. They are calculated using pooled harmonized data from 17 countries. In order to analyze the same set of countries every year, interpolation was applied when country data were not available for a given year. 

Where are the cheapest and most expensive countries to own a mobile phone?

Tariq Khokhar's picture


Eight in 10 people in the developing world own a mobile phone, but the cost of using mobiles varies significantly. The 2016 World Development Report explores the impact of the Internet and mobiles on human development.

If you're interested in exploring this data a bit further, I put together a dashboard using the original data source (Table 4.2 in the ITU's Measuring the Information Society 2015 - PDF link). Since extracting data from a PDF isn't always error free, I take responsibility for any "transcription errors" - but having looked it over a couple of times, I don't see anything obviously amiss. 


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