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February 2018

Economic and social policies have a significant role to play in the prevention of violent conflicts

Alexandre Marc's picture



Policy makers can find two simple but key messages coming out of the jointly published UN–World Bank report, “Pathways for Peace, Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Conflict.” The first is that economic and social development can play a central role in preventing violent conflict; the second is that development needs to be conceived differently in countries or regions that have obvious risks of violent conflict. The report also argues that governments and the donor community are far from having internalized these messages; as a result, huge opportunities are being missed. The report clearly shows that prevention works and creates significant savings—but for these to be realized, actions must be undertaken early and sustained over a long period of time. They must also be strongly focused on the ways in which security, peacebuilding, development, and humanitarian concerns intersect.

Podcasts to prevent intimate partner violence: Leveraging social networks in Somali refugee camps in Ethiopia

Anne Bennett's picture
Aerial view of Dollo Ado refugee camps in Ethiopia. The camps are home to an estimated 212,000 Somali refugees who are displaced as a result of war and drought.
Photo credit: Samuel Tewolde


Globally, 30% of women have experienced physical and/or sexual violence by an intimate partner (IPV) during their lifetime. IPV prevalence is likely higher during humanitarian crises, when women and girls, men and boys, are more vulnerable to violence in the family and community, and during displacement. In fact, a growing body of evidence suggest that IPV is the most common form of violence in humanitarian settings but that it often receives less attention than non-partner sexual violence during conflict or humanitarian crisis.