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Friday Roundup: Ebola, Malaria and Cellphones, Jean Tirole, Report on the Data Revolution, and Deworming

LTD Editors's picture

The World Health Organization (WHO) said today that it was sending more experts to help Mali fight Ebola, a day after the first case of the disease was confirmed there.  Read more.

Martin Edlund, CEO of Malaria No More, writes in Devex.com about the big role cell phones can play in eliminating malaria, refering to it as a 'Swiss Army knife' for the disease.

A Bitter Side to Andhra Pradesh's Ex-Post Sugarcane Permit System

Richard J. Sexton's picture

India is the World’s second largest producer of sugarcane (after Brazil). Approximately 45 million Indian farmers are involved in cane production, and cane processing is the second largest agro-processing sector in the Country. In her dissertation research on this industry (supervised by Goodhue and Sexton) Sandhya Patlolla encountered an unusual marketing practice that is unique to the Andhra Pradesh (AP) State. Private sugar processors issue ‘permits’ to selected cane growers a few weeks before harvest. These permits allow growers to deliver a specified amount of cane during a specified period of time. Farmers without a permit must sell their cane at a reduced price for manufacture into gur, a traditional Indian sweetener. The price difference averaged 43% over the six years of data acquired for our study. We wondered why sugar processors in AP would create uncertainty among farmers by using ex post permits instead of offering ex ante production contracts?

Do Nepali businesses have more female managers compared to other countries?

Arvind Jain's picture

One of the primary goals of the Enterprise Surveys is to provide high quality data about the business environment based on establishments’ actual day-to-day experiences. This provides much needed information given how little is known about what businesses experience in developing economies. To raise awareness of the recently released Nepal 2013 Enterprise Survey, we provide a few highlights below. 
 
The Nepal 2013 Enterprise Survey consists of face-to-face interviews with 482 firms across the Central, Western, and Eastern regions in Nepal. Fieldwork was conducted between February and June 2013, with survey questions referencing the 2013 fiscal year. This post will focus on a couple of highlights. For the full survey highlights please see the Nepal 2013 Country Highlights document.

Friday Roundup: Agricultural Productivity & Poverty Reduction in Bangladesh, International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, A conversation with Yang Lan on Ending Extreme Poverty, Measuring Poverty, and Universal Health

LTD Editors's picture

A new working paper by Shahe Emran and Forhad Shilpi looks at the impact of increased agricultural productivity (e.g. through increased rainfall) on hired labor, wages and poverty. The paper finds a positive response of labor hours devoted to market activities as opposed to home production. Evidence also indicates that a positive rainfall shock increases per capita consumption significantly, thus implying that agricultural productivity increase played an important role in poverty reduction achieved in the last two decades in rural Bangladesh.

Today is the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, and the theme for this year is 'Leave no one behind: think, decide and act together against extreme poverty.' Learn more, and follow on Twitter #endpoverty.

What are the top obstacles for Bangladeshi businesses?

Arvind Jain's picture

One of the primary goals of the Enterprise Surveys is to provide high quality data about the business environment based on establishments’ actual day-to-day experiences. This provides much needed information given how little is known about what businesses experience in developing economies. To raise awareness of the recently released Bangladesh 2013 Enterprise Survey, we provide a few highlights of the surveys below. 

Poverty measurement and PPPs: The World Bank explains

LTD Editors's picture

As the editors of Let's Talk Development, we want to respond to questions raised recently in social media channels about use of 2011 International Comparison Program (ICP) as well as during events and discussions about poverty and measurements during the Annual Meetings of the World Bank and IMF last week.

The World Bank currently uses an international poverty line of $1.25 (per person per day) in 2005 prices to monitor global poverty. The process draws on several data sources, including the ICP. The most recent  global and regional poverty estimates cover the period 1981-2011 and are available from the recently updated Povcalnet database; they are based on data from well over 1,000 household surveys, covering nearly all developing countries. The latest estimates have been published and  explained in both the recent Policy Research Report and the Global Monitoring Report, published last week.

Parsing the challenges of measuring poverty and shared prosperity

Peter Lanjouw's picture

The data and processes needed to measure global poverty and gauge improvements in the prosperity of the bottom 40% of people in each country present complex challenges and provoke considerable debate amongst poverty experts.  

From the comparability of household surveys and their use in policy design to the utility of purchasing power parity data as a unifying standard for measuring the poor, the devil in global poverty analysis is in the details. It’s also vital to understand the World Bank’s recently adopted twin goals in a broader context, to see how they fit into a broader array of monitorable indicators that each come with their own specific features and insights. We must also listen to client governments and outside partners when they prefer to go beyond income to look at multidimensional social welfare functions.

Ebola’s economic damage to Africa: How much? How long?

Maryla Maliszewska's picture

As current and former World Bank employees, we have all worked to speed the development of African economies and have viewed Africa’s recent spectacular growth with mounting enthusiasm. Thus, we have followed with growing sadness and dismay the stories of human suffering emanating from Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea in the context of the Ebola epidemic. These horrifying stories of the effect of Ebola in West Africa are now overshadowing continued good economic news from the rest of the continent.

About a month ago we were asked – together with a much larger team – to estimate the economic costs of the outbreak for the West Africa region. The report, titled “The Economic Impact of the 2014 Ebola Epidemic: Short and Medium Term Estimates for West Africa,” was released yesterday.

Inequality at the very very very top: What does the Forbes Billionaires database tell us?

Joao Pedro Azevedo's picture

Thinking about inequality is back in fashion! In its November 2013 outlook, the World Economic Forum called rising inequality the second biggest risk for 2014-15. The 2014 English translation of French economist Thomas Piketty’s “Capital in the 21st Century” became an instant bestseller among academics and practitioners in both developed and developing countries. Discussions of inequality are popping up everywhere, and even seem to be setting the tone of many round tables and presentations in the World Bank Group’s upcoming Annual Meetings.

Voting with their feet? Access to infrastructure and migration in Nepal

Forhad Shilpi's picture

Do migrants respond to differences in access to public goods and services in addition to income prospects of potential destinations?  This issue is important in developing countries where provision of basic public goods affects not only income prospects but also quality of life. And in these countries, provision of public goods tends to vary widely across areas.  In a Tiebout (1956) sorting model, such disparity in the provision of public goods such as roads, electricity, schools, hospitals, etc. should induce people to "vote with their feet" and to migrate to areas with better access to these infrastructures and services.

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