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Friday round-up: Agriculture for the future, seafood, ideas trumping interests, plus the locust effect

LTD Editors's picture

William Dar of ICRISAT describes how global farm innovators can help re-green the Sahel.

A new World Bank study, 'Fish to 2030: Prospects for Fisheries and Aquaculture', analyzes the rise in seafood demand and how to sustainably expand aquaculture.

Dani Rodrik has an article in the Journal of Economic Perspects on when ideas trump interests.

Early Feedback on Initial WDR 2015 Pre-Launch Engagement

Stephen Commins's picture

The following post is a part of a series that discusses 'mind and culture,' the theme of the World Bank’s upcoming World Development Report 2015.

As a way of reaching out on the core messages for WDR2015, I asked for feedback on Linked In via two groups that I’m a member of -- the International Development Forum and Society for International Development groups. I received the following diverse comments, including from Tunisia, South Africa, Congo Brazzaville, France, Italy, and the US:
 

It was time! I am impressed that in development literature, classical and practical anthropology is not present. May be they should have listened to Drucker –more well-known than many anthropologists: “culture eats strategy at breakfast”.
 

I trust the [World] Bank will examine 'rationality' among the poor in the context of recent studies which demonstrate a relationship between the stress of day-to-day life, particularly decision-making, among the poor and the loss of cognitive capacity. See here for a popular discussion of the science. Rules of thumb may replace rationality in decision making by poor people as a means of coping with the stress of repeated daily decisions on actions requiring financial resources a poor person does not have. It may be quite challenging for professional economists to enter the mindset of the chronically poor.
 

Friday Round Up: Lunar New Year, The ills of capitalism, Grim EM news, Lin on ditching the dollar, and a Call for a third industrial revolution

LTD Editors's picture

To usher in the Lunar New Year read this Jakarta Post piece on the high-spirited Year of the Horse.

John Hilsenrath warns in Central Station on the WSJ Real Time Economix blog that there may be 'No Bottom in Sight for Emerging Markets' and he uses a chart from the World Bank's Global Economic Prospects to make his point.

India, Turkey and South Africa have all raised interest rates this week. This was in part to stop sharp devaluations fuelling inflation as investors switch into recovering developed countries such as the US. India‘s central bank governor has hit out at the US and other industrialised countries for running selfish economic policies.

Addressing Household Air Pollution: A Case Study in Rural Madagascar

Susmita Dasgupta's picture

More than half the world’s population cooks with solid biomass fuels, such as wood, dung, charcoal or agricultural residues. Use of these fuels has been found to cause significant levels of respiratory infections, as well as trachea, bronchus, and lung cancers, ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cataracts. The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 found Household Air Pollution (HAP) from solid fuels to be the third leading cause of disease worldwide. Mitigation of HAP has a vital role for lowering health risks, particularly for women and children in developing countries where cooking with solid fuels is a common practice.

As incomes rise, the transition to modern energy sources will ultimately reduce HAP. During the transition, efforts to increase access to cleaner fuels, provision of improved stoves, and public information leading to improved ventilation and behavior change may significantly reduce exposure to household smoke. Design of HAP reduction strategies has been hindered, however, by a lack of data on air quality in households and the health benefits of potential mitigation measures.

What Can We Learn from Projecting Poverty for 2030?

Nobuo Yoshida's picture

As a poverty economist, I know how difficult it is to forecast poverty numbers for even the next year. But, since the World Bank Group (WBG) announced the goal of ending extreme poverty by 2030, I have been projecting poverty numbers of some countries and regions for nearly two decades into the future. I could not help but ask myself “What am I doing this for?”

Forecasting versus Benchmarking
I looked for answers by reading recent papers on similar topics. Most seemed to be competing to prove that their projections were the most plausible. Some seemed better than others, but they were not convincing enough to erase my doubt. Before giving up the search, I reread Ravallion (2012, 2013) , and at last got an answer. In both papers Ravallion projected future poverty under the assumption that the developing world maintains its current pace of growth and poverty reduction. Although his methodology ensures that his projection predicts future poverty accurately if this assumption holds, it is still uncertain whether this assumption will hold and, consequently, whether his projection will prevail.

Friday round up: Q&A with Kaushik Basu, Challenges to Growth, Income Equality and Aid

LTD Editors's picture

India's Telegraph newspaper reports on a Q&A Kaushik Basu had recently with economist/filmmaker Suman Ghosh.

Nobel laureate Michael Spence writes on Project Syndicate about The Real Challenges to Growth.

World Bank President Jim Yong Kim shares his views on LinkedIn on how income inequality ought to be discussed at Davos.

Big Data Diving and US Intergenerational Income Mobility Hold Vital Lessons

Vamsee Kanchi's picture

Patterns of intergenerational income mobility in the United States reveal valuable lessons for economists and policy makers not just in this country, but also for the developing world, where successful efforts to promote shared prosperity and foster create better prospects for youth and children too often meet with frustration.

Raj Chetty, Professor of Economics at Harvard University lectured on this topic recently at the World Bank. For his talk, Chetty drew on recent research by him, Nathaniel Hendren, Patrick Kline and Emmanuel Saez. Chetty and team analyzed anonymous tax records on earnings of 40 million US children and their parents to gauge a child's chances of moving up the income distribution relative to his or her parents.

Relative risk ratings and shadow sovereign ratings for 120+ countries

Dilip Ratha's picture

Sovereign credit ratings assigned by the major rating agencies (such as Fitch, Moody’s and Standard and Poor’s) play a major role in determining the government’s access to international capital markets. Although sovereign ratings relate to debt and creditworthiness of the central government, in effect they serve as a barometer of confidence and a ceiling for creditworthiness for the private sector as well. They influence the borrowing costs of private entities and in a wider sense overall investment flows. The sovereign rating is often a benchmark and sub-sovereign entities, such as companies and banks, rarely get a rating higher than the sovereign’s.

From shock therapy to sustainable development

Hans Timmer's picture

Last week I attended the Gaidar Forum in Moscow. Yegor Gaidar was an economist who became the architect of the Russian market economy as deputy prime minister of the Russian Federation in 1992. Like Leszek Balcerowitz in Poland and Vaclav Klaus in Czechoslovakia, Gaidar was a pioneer of the shock therapy: rapid liberalization of prices; opening up of borders to allow free international trade; and privatization of capital. Gaidar died in 2009 at an age of 53. In his memory the Gaidar Forum was organized for the first time in 2010. This was the fifth time the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration organized this annual conference that brings together ministers, academics, and business people.

Mime your manners

Ryan Muldoon's picture

The following post is a part of a series that discusses 'mind and culture,' the theme of the World Bank’s upcoming World Development Report 2015.

When the former Mayor of Bogota, Antanas Mockus, began his first term in office, a major quality of life problem in the city was the awful traffic, aggravated by reckless driving and mass disobedience of traffic rules. The situation increased air pollution, reduced labor productivity, and created a sense that the city was dysfunctional. The traffic police were at the time notoriously corrupt:  drivers had merely to bribe the police to avoid more substantial penalties for traffic violations. Mockus fired all the traffic police and in their place hired approximately 400 mimes. The mimes were trained to mock people’s traffic violations and to demonstrate better behavior. The mime demonstrations succeeded - traffic improved greatly and traffic fatalities declined 50% in the center city where the mimes operated. Traffic police were later reinstated after retraining, but already traffic flowed more smoothly. (See here)

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