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Friday Roundup: Aamir Khan, Bill Gates, Lotteries in Lesotho, income classifications, Ravallion on aid after coups & Rodrik on growth

LTD Editors's picture

A short video shared via Twitter highlights Bill Gates' recent India trip. He covers the rotavirus, agricultural innovation, and a joint TV appearance with Bollywood star and development activist Aamir Khan.

World Bank researcher Damien de Walque's recent results from a Randomized Control Trial in Lesotho of a lottery scheme to reduce risky sexual behavior was presented at an AIDS conference in Malaysia and covered in Bloomberg.

The World Bank updated its classification of the world's economies based on estimates of gross national income (GNI). Among other things, Russia moves to high income status; also, Chile, Lithuania, and Uruguay become high-income for the first time. 

"Japan ahead of China in forging Africa Partnerships" is the title of a piece in The Global Times.

Through the smog, gently: Postcard from Malaysia

Kaushik Basu's picture


My travels in Malaysia begin at the distant eastern edge of the country, in Sabah's capital, Kota Kinabalu, the strange name a reminder of the distance I have traveled from home. Meeting local folks, regional politicians, and masters of local arts and crafts, it quickly becomes evident that this ancient island, Borneo, symbolizes all the mysteries and romance of human movement through history. The people who seem settled here forever arrived one day after traveling great distances, braving the wilds and the seas. They were then the modern people who had come to an ancient land. They would soon be absorbed and become the natives in the eyes of the next wave of arrival and modern-day visitors like us.

Frederico, Vivian, Kup (a senior officer of the Ministry of Finance) and I are received at the airport at Kota Kinabalu by a charming young woman, Intan. She is tall and has a head-scarf carefully draped around her head covering her hair. Intan explains she is part Arab, part Chinese, and part Bajau, an ancient tribal people. She smiles and adds that she considers herself Bajau.

Friday round up: Tapering trouble, debating inequality, the greedy rich, waves of protests, and a view from the UN

LTD Editors's picture

John Makin of AEI has a piece on troubling taper talk from central banks. Read it here.

In "What if we're looking at inequality the wrong way?', Tom Edsall of NYT's Opinionator blog writes about the views of Richard V. Burkhauser of Cornell as well as those of his co-authors.

Robert Skidelsky advocates for a universal basic income, received by all citizens on an unconditional basis in his post, "Playing by the rules," in Project Syndicate. Read more.

Health and the post-2015 development agenda: Stuck in the doldrums?

Adam Wagstaff's picture

I think it’s fair to say most of us don’t typically take UN reports with us on our summer vacation. But you might want make an exception in the case of the high-level panel (HLP) report on the post-2015 development agenda. It offers a nice opportunity to reflect how – over the last 15 years or so – we have seen some serious global shifts in values, expectations and motivations. 

The HLP feels the MDGs were worthwhile: “the MDGs set out an inspirational rallying cry for the whole world”. As my colleague Varun Gauri argues, goals inspire if they are underpinned by a moral case, and the panel pushes hard on issues of rights and responsibilities, social justice, and fairness: “new goals and targets need to be grounded in respect for universal human rights”; “these are issues of basic social justice. Many people living in poverty have not had a fair chance.” 

Amartya Sen on India and China

Merrell Tuck-Primdahl's picture

'Why is China Ahead of India? Implications for Europe and the US,' was the topic of a talk yesterday at the World Bank by Nobel winner Amartya Sen which was chaired by Kaushik Basu. In the span of just under two hours, Sen managed to pinpoint India's main Achilles Heel (primarily related to the low overall quality of education, poor health care and skewed energy and other subsidies), while weaving in references to Kido Takayoshi, Mao Zedong, David Hume, Mahatma Gandhi, Adam Smith, Jon Stuart Mill, Milton Friedman, Keynes, Marx and other thinkers and influencers. 

Amartya's talk coincided with the publication of a New York Times op ed titled 'Why India Trails China' in which he stressed that one cannot wait to fix health and education only after reaching some modicum of overall prosperity. Indeed, proper health and education, which foster human capabilities, are an essential precondition to sustainable growth and the ability to compete successfully in an integrated world. India still needs to take these East Asian lessons fully on board.  

Ending Extreme Poverty In Our Generation

Kate Dooley's picture

It sounds impossible.  Unthinkable.  A world free from extreme poverty.  A world in which no child is born to die, no child goes to bed hungry, every child lives a life free from violence and abuse and has quality health care, nutrition and learns in school. This has long been Save the Children’s vision but could now be a shared global vision, and by 2030 perhaps, a reality.

On  May 30, 2013, a special panel of world leaders handed in their recommendations to the United Nations (UN) Secretary General on the future of global sustainable development and they, too, believe this can be our reality.

Friday Roundup: Gates on Buffett, Studwell's book on Asian industrial policy, WSJ on herd instincts, Letters from Dads to Daughters

LTD Editors's picture

Bill Gates blogs on three things he's learned from Warren Buffet. 

In a review on Joe Studwell's 'How Asia Works,'book Tyler Cowen hails this latest book on successes and failures of Asian industrial policy, including some of the more ruthless aspects of chaebols in South Korea: 

The WSJ's Real Time Economics has a piece titled "Emerging-Market Volatility Shows 'Herd Mentality'" by Ian Talley based on this week's launch of Global Economic Prospects 2013 (summer edition).  

Ending Poverty and Boosting Shared Prosperity: Key Elements of a Development Agenda

Zia Qureshi's picture

At its Spring Meeting, the Development Committee endorsed the eradication of poverty and the promotion of shared prosperity as the twin goals of the World Bank Group mission. What development agenda is implied by these goals? What are the key elements of a development policy framework that should inform WBG strategy to achieve these goals?

Economic growth has been central to the progress achieved in reducing poverty and boosting the incomes of the bottom segments of the population. The change in poverty can be decomposed into the growth of average incomes and the change in inequality. Cross-country analysis shows that, in the medium- to long-term, upwards of 70 percent of the variation in poverty can be attributed to economic growth.  Similarly, the rise in the incomes of the bottom 40 percent of the population can be decomposed into the change in the income per capita of the country and the change in the share of total income that is received by the bottom 40 percent. A review of the data for changes in the income per capita of the bottom 40 percent over the past two decades reveals that, in most cases, overall economic growth played the predominant role.

Were Gordon Brown and I right? Were poor children actually left behind by the Millennium Development Goals for education?

Adam Wagstaff's picture

It’s quite fun being picked up by a prime minister. Not literally of course. Unless you happen to be a baby seized from your mother’s arms during an election campaign, in which case it must be rather exciting, and quite possibly the highlight of the day. No, I mean being picked up in print. 

In a recent Washington Post op-ed, former UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown, and current United Nations’ Special Envoy for Global Education, cited a Let’s Talk Development blog post of mine asking whether inequality should be reflected in the new international development goals. Toward the end of the post I presented some rather shocking numbers showing how – in a large number of developing countries – the poorest 40% have made slower progress toward key MDG health targets than the richest 60%. Although I didn’t actually offer any evidence on education, I argued: “If inequalities in education and health outcomes across the income distribution matter, and if we want to see “prosperity” in its broadest sense shared, it looks like we really do need an explicit goal that captures inequality.

A Data Guide to Sir Michael Barber’s “The Good News from Pakistan”

Jishnu Das's picture

Shanta’s blog reported on Sir Michael Barber’s approach to implementing service delivery or “Deliverology”. Sir Michael was back at the World Bank on June 6th to present “The Good News from Pakistan”, where he outlined the impressive changes in Punjab, Pakistan as a result of his leadership in delivering deliverology. As a discussant, with Dhushyanth Raju’s inputs (Dhushyanth is a Senior Economist in the World Bank's South Asia education team), I examined and triangulated the existing data. Despite my original excitement about the method and the results after reading the report, I am reluctantly forced to conclude that at the moment the data do not support the report’s claims (see my presentation). That’s not to say there’s no good news from Pakistan on education. Just the opposite in fact: the good news is the large increase in enrollment and learning that predated Sir Michael’s deliverology intervention.