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LTD Editors's blog

Friday Roundup: DeLong on Piketty, Gentzkow wins Bates Medal, Mobile Money, and Remittances in Africa

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Equitablog, run by the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, has launched a series of 'Notes and Finger Exercises on Thomas Piketty’s “Capital in the Twenty-First Century.' Brad DeLong's post, 'There Are Four r’s', details some alleged oversights in Piketty's book. In particular, DeLong focuses on how the real interest rate behaves at different levels of economic activity. He highlights Larry Summers' concern about secular stagnation and the risk that rich folks might retreat from investing in industry. And DeLong pulls out some sexy math.

Matthew Gentzkow has won the John Bates Clark Medal, an honor conferred by the American Economic Association for his contributions to "our understanding of the economic forces driving the creation of media products, the changing nature and role of media in the digital environment, and the effect of media on education and civic engagement..."

Dynamic Effects of Microcredit in Bangladesh

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With the phenomenal growth of microfinance institutions representing 30 million members with over $2 billion of annual disbursement over the past two decades, it is important to understand the dynamics of microcredit expansion and its induced impact on household welfare. A new World Bank working paper by Shahidur R. Khandker and Hussain A. Samad uses long panel survey data spanning over 20 years to examine the dynamics of microcredit programs in Bangladesh.

WB President has conversation with Sachs and Basu moderated by Lowrey of the NYT

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 Steven Shapiro / World BankPresident Jim Yong Kim, Prof Jeff Sachs, Chief Economist Kaushik Basu and Annie Lowrey of the New York Times participated in a panel last Friday titled 'Sharing Prosperity, Delivering Results.'

The four discussed the challenges of achieving the World Bank Group's goals of ending extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity, and in so doing, all stressed the need to take on the goals with an activist's zeal.

Friday round up: Spring Meetings at the WB and IMF

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From calling for a Data Revolution to analyzing the power of migration and development, to sharing prosperity and the moral imperative of ending poverty and discrimination, there are a dizzying array of events, meetings and ideas buzzing at this week's Spring Meetings of the WB and IMF.

On Data, you can watch the webcast of an event at the Bank where Jim Jong Kim, the Chief Economist of the AFDB and Haishan Fu of the Data Group in the Development Economics Vice Presidency spoke of their vision for better statistics harnessed for the greater good. Also, David Roodman has a compelling post on what it will take to overhaul methods of data collection and donor as well as country coordination.

New Working Paper by Aart Kraay and David McKenzie: Do poverty traps exist?

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This paper reviews the empirical evidence on the existence of poverty traps, understood as self-reinforcing mechanisms through which poor individuals or countries remain poor. Poverty traps, understood as self-reinforcing mechanisms through which poor individuals or countries remain poor, have captured the interest of many development policy makers, because poverty traps provide a theoretically coherent explanation for persistent poverty. They also suggest that temporary policy interventions may have long-term effects on poverty. However, a review of the reduced-form empirical evidence suggests that truly stagnant incomes of the sort predicted by standard models of poverty traps are in fact quite rare. Read the entire paper here.

Friday Roundup: Malthusian worries, USAID global development lab, Hillary on ending poverty, Africa Impact Evaluation and a sharing prosperity event

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Eduardo Porter's Apr 1 column 'Old Forecast of Famine May Yet Come True,' touches on Malthus, famine and the sweeping impacts of climate change highlighted in the latest IPCC report.

Virginia Gewin of Nature magazine carries a story on USAID's new Global Development Lab, a $100 million effort that will fund research into technological solutions for targeted problems related to food security and nutrition, maternal and child survival, energy access and sustainable water solutions.

Friday Roundup: Tunisia cronyism, Africa land grabs, Banerjee to lecture, Piketty and Easterly books reviewed, Basu in top thinker contest and more

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The Washington Post's Monkey Cage has a post on crony capitalism in Tunisia that draws from the findings of a widely reported WB working paper by Bob Rijkers, Caroline Freund and Antonio Nucifora  titled 'All in the Family: State Capture in Tunisia.'

Kayode Ogunbunmi, correspondent from City Voice newspaper in Nigeria, covered the World Bank's Annual Land and Poverty Conference in Washington this week his story for Reuters TrustLaw website looks at how foreign investors are often blamed for Africa land grabs conducted by local ruling elites.

Friday Roundup: Chronic poverty, remittances, debating inequality, water worries and agriculture, and gender in Africa

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A report by ODI, "The Chronic Poverty Report 2014-2015:The Road to Zero Extreme Poverty," provides an impoverishment index to help countries determine which priorities will pull their citizens out of poverty.

'Remittances and Vulnerability in Developing Countries,' a new World Bank Policy Research Working Paper by Giulia Bettin, Andrea F. Presbitero, and Nikola Spatafora, examines how international remittances are affected by structural characteristics, macroeconomic conditions, and adverse shocks in both source and recipient economies.

Friday round up: Population worries in Africa, the internet in 2025, managing oil wealth, global food policy, and Bangladesh microcredit

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A piece titled 'The dividend is delayed' in the March 8 edition of The Economist summarizes a new research paper by Jean-Pierre Guengant and John May titled, 'African Demography,' which predicts a higher fertility rate for Africa than calculated by the UN.

Sarah Gray writes in Salon about the future of the internet in 2025.

Inspiring change, one drop at a time!

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The following post is a part of a series that discusses 'mind and culture,' the theme of the World Bank’s upcoming World Development Report 2015.

For one night, the Cirque du Soleil closes all its shows in Las Vegas. Instead, more than 100 artists come together to create one magnificent show in support of One Drop to give out a simple, yet very powerful message: water, for today and forever. For One Drop, awareness is as essential as economic development to drive change to make water accessible to all. The non-profit organization uses social arts to connect, communicate, and convince communities to adopt sound water management practices that ensure sustainability in the long run. The Let’s Talk team caught up with Jacques Rajotte, Chief Operating and Innovation Officer, and Danielle Valiquette, Chief International Programs Officer, One Drop, on their visit to the World Bank last week to know more about operationalizing social arts as an impactful tool for social transformation.

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