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Friday Round up – Inequality, a Web Index, India’s Urbanization & Ranking Development Journals

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This week Paul Krugman reacts to Joe Stiglitz’s Income Inequality Argument: ‘Inequality and Recovery.’  

A new Web Index just went live. Designed and produced by the World Wide Web Foundation, the Web Index — http://thewebindex.org/ —  is a multi-dimensional measure of the Web’s growth, utility and impact on people and nations. It covers 61 developed and developing countries, incorporating indicators that assess the political, economic and social impact of the Web, as well as indicators of Web connectivity and infrastructure. There’s a 2012 index and other details on the Web Index site.

Friday Roundup: Migration and Development, Global Economy and Innovation, and WDR App

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About 3% of the world's people live outside the country of their birth. What does this mean for the migrants, and their countries – most of which are developing? The Guardian is inviting comments and questions on the topic of migration and its impact on development for its monthly podcast. To learn more, read “Talk point: what is the impact of migration on development?,” which also quotes the latest remittances figures from the World Bank.

According to the latest edition of Global Economic Prospects, (GEP), the global GDP  is estimated to grow by  2.4 percent in 2013, marked by weaker growth in  developed countries. With the global economy remaining fragile, a return to the “good times” seems farther now. The Economist argues that the economic stagnation of the rich countries is also hurting innovation, which has direct links to economic growth. Read the post from to know more. While on this topic, according to figures from the GEP, the value of exports from developing countries to other developing countries (“South-South” trade) now exceeds exports from poor countries to rich ones (“South-North” trade). Read the full article on The Economist here.

World Economy – a glass half empty or half full?

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As Kaushik Basu said yesterday, downside risks to the global economy have diminished, market conditions look better, borrowing costs in advanced economies are down from worrying levels seen last June, and developing country growth is still in the 5 percent range. Yet this improvement is transmitting to the real side very minimally.

That was just one of the takeaways from Global Economic Prospects 2013, launched January 15. A new-look global outlook site allows users to access a wealth of analysis, forecasts and data for the world’s economies.

Friday round up: Social media innovation, a handy graphic, inequality, and Kaushik in the news

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From tracking World Bank projects to Twitter conversations with Rwanda's health minister, technology is driving innovation. Read about it in ‘Poverty Matters.’

The fastest growing and shrinking economies in 2013 are laid out in a handy graphic in The Economist online.

The study of distribution and inequality is ‘au courant’ among economists these days and Branko Milanovic of the World Bank’s Research Group contributes to the debate in a post on the Harvard Business Review’s blog platform.

Year-end Reflections and Trends for 2013: Final Friday Roundup for 2012

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It’s the end of the year, which means there are all sorts of retrospectives on the big things that happened in 2012.  Here’s a list of interesting articles that recap the year gone by.

• Andres Marroquin’s blog lists the top ten economic papers of 2012. Topping the list is a working paper from the Journal of Politics 201 titled ‘Economic Conditions and the Quality of Suicide Terrorism’. See more papers here.

• Consider yourself an aficionado of the latest in global development issues? Then test your knowledge by taking a quiz put together by The Guardian.

Chart: Good jobs for development are not the same everywhere

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From the World Development Report 2013.

Looking through the jobs lens and focusing on the key features of the different country types can help identify more clearly the kinds of jobs that would make the greatest contribution to development in each case. This focus allows for a richer analysis of the potential tradeoffs between living standards, productivity, and social cohesion in a specific context.

Friday Roundup: China’s Cities, India’s healthcare, US jobs & the Fiscal Cliff

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In “How Cities Can Save China” Henry Paulson, former US Treasury Secretary and current head of the Paulson Institute, argues in this week’s New York Times that better city planning will allow China’s investments to be more balanced, debt levels to be lowered, pollution to be eased, and a consumption windfall to be realized.

Chart: Low-income countries lag behind in realizing progress in female school enrollment

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From the World Development Report 2012.

For poor women and for women in very poor places, sizable gender gaps remain. In education, where gaps have narrowed in most countries, girls’ enrollment in primary and secondary school has improved little in many Sub-Saharan countries and some parts of South Asia. School enrollments for girls in Mali are comparable to those in the United States in 1810, and the situation in Ethiopia and Pakistan is not much better.

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