Syndicate content

LTD Editors's blog

Friday Roundup: International Women’s Day, Water ATMs and Crop Research

LTD Editors's picture

As we celebrate the 102nd International Women’s Day today, what do women of the world hope to achieve this year? An end to gender-based violence. The Guardian has put together a page to highlight the voices from all over the globe on tackling violence and discrimination against women. Read them all here on this interactive page.

While on the subject of Women’s Day, where is best place to be a working woman in the rich world? Apparently, the answer is New Zealand. The Economist has compiled a “glass-ceiling index” to show where women have the best chance of equal treatment at work. See the index here, which compares data from 26 countries.

Friday Roundup: Rural Programmes, Middle-Income Trap, Slums in Africa, Currency Wars, and Open States

LTD Editors's picture

By encompassing social, political, and feudal factors in development, Rural Support Programmes have enjoyed success in India and Pakistan for the past 30 years. Why did they work? For one, the approach acknowledges that ‘one size doesn’t fit all’ and second, it looks for a holistic growth. Read the article on the Guardian to find out how communities can unlock their own potential.

What is a middle-income trap? The concept has been quite popular for some time, but only recently has been tested and defined. The concept broadly defines the fast-growing economies that suffered steep slowdown, and hence their dilemma of being caught between poverty and prosperity. There has been a lot of debate on poverty or prosperity, but it has substantially benefitted from work done by Barry Eichengreen, Donghyun Park, and Kwanho Shin. Read the post on Free Excgange to get an insight on their work.

Friday Roundup: Intergenerational Mobility; Trade and Poverty; India’s Trading Partners, and UHC

LTD Editors's picture

Gary Solon’s work on “Intergenerational Income Mobility in the United States,” not only questioned the previously existing consensus of highly mobile American households, but also concluded that the correlation between a father’s earnings and his son’s might be at least 0.4 or higher. Years after his work, new studies have been emerging and suggest that the 0.4 correlation might be a bit too optimistic. In this vein, how can we tackle the issue of  inter-generational social immobility? The Free Exchange blog has enlisted Miles Corak, Gregory Clark, and World Bank’s Francisco Ferreira to comment on the field. Read the summary and expert remarks here.

There is often talk about how trade harms the poor, especially in closed economies. However, evidence suggests otherwise. In a recent World Bank Policy Research Working Paper, Raju Jan Singh and Maelan Le Goff find that, trade does tend to reduce poverty, in specific settings. Read Raju’s blog post to know more.

Friday Roundup: Currency wars, Microfinance, Future Orientation Index, Remittances

LTD Editors's picture

Currency wars actually have some redeeming impact, argues Matthew O’Brien in The Atlantic. Read it here.

A lively debate is under way on David Roodman’s Microfinance Open Book Blog.


According to the “Future Orientation Index” created by academics from University College London (UCL) and Warwick University, the number of searches on Google for ‘future’ are an indication of a nation’s -- or its citizen’s -- forward thinking. By analyzing more than 45 billion Google queries, the index ranks Germany as the most forward thinking nation in 2012. If you are curious about others, take a look here

Friday Roundup: Climate Change, China, Cash Transfers & Bill's Letter

LTD Editors's picture

With warnings on the effects of climate change becoming starker with every passing day, good news came in the form of a story that the world's biggest seed banks are getting funding to help protect and develop new varieties of seeds resistant to climate change and other threats.

More sobering was a post by the World Bank's Phil Hay about Mozambique's recent devastating floods and public sector measures to help the country recover.

Friday Round up – Inequality, a Web Index, India’s Urbanization & Ranking Development Journals

LTD Editors's picture

This week Paul Krugman reacts to Joe Stiglitz’s Income Inequality Argument: ‘Inequality and Recovery.’  

A new Web Index just went live. Designed and produced by the World Wide Web Foundation, the Web Index — http://thewebindex.org/ —  is a multi-dimensional measure of the Web’s growth, utility and impact on people and nations. It covers 61 developed and developing countries, incorporating indicators that assess the political, economic and social impact of the Web, as well as indicators of Web connectivity and infrastructure. There’s a 2012 index and other details on the Web Index site.

Friday Roundup: Migration and Development, Global Economy and Innovation, and WDR App

LTD Editors's picture

About 3% of the world's people live outside the country of their birth. What does this mean for the migrants, and their countries – most of which are developing? The Guardian is inviting comments and questions on the topic of migration and its impact on development for its monthly podcast. To learn more, read “Talk point: what is the impact of migration on development?,” which also quotes the latest remittances figures from the World Bank.

According to the latest edition of Global Economic Prospects, (GEP), the global GDP  is estimated to grow by  2.4 percent in 2013, marked by weaker growth in  developed countries. With the global economy remaining fragile, a return to the “good times” seems farther now. The Economist argues that the economic stagnation of the rich countries is also hurting innovation, which has direct links to economic growth. Read the post from to know more. While on this topic, according to figures from the GEP, the value of exports from developing countries to other developing countries (“South-South” trade) now exceeds exports from poor countries to rich ones (“South-North” trade). Read the full article on The Economist here.

World Economy – a glass half empty or half full?

LTD Editors's picture

As Kaushik Basu said yesterday, downside risks to the global economy have diminished, market conditions look better, borrowing costs in advanced economies are down from worrying levels seen last June, and developing country growth is still in the 5 percent range. Yet this improvement is transmitting to the real side very minimally.

That was just one of the takeaways from Global Economic Prospects 2013, launched January 15. A new-look global outlook site allows users to access a wealth of analysis, forecasts and data for the world’s economies.

Pages