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Water

Uncertainty in groundwater supply may limit the adoption of water-saving technology in India

Hanan Jacoby's picture

During the dry season, N. S. Reddy, a farmer in Kadapa district of Andhra Pradesh, cultivates groundnut on two acres using water from his own borewell, which he runs for the six hours every day that his village gets electricity. His neighbor, J. R. Prasad, owning a borewell of similar capacity, fully cultivates his single acre of land, but also sells water to A. R. Murthy to grow sunflower. At the end of the season, Mr. Murthy gives Mr. Prasad 3000 Rupees as payment on his contract for irrigating this half acre. In a different village, a similar scenario plays out, but here the borewell owner, K. Chandra, sells M. S. Krishna five irrigations, one-at-a-time throughout the season, at 1000 Rupees apiece.

Democratising development drop by drop

Jose Luis Irigoyen's picture

Can a new set of brains bring a new set of solutions to water problems? Water is at the heart of some of the world's most pressing development challenges. For example:

  1. human development: diarrhea kills more children than AIDS, malaria and TB combined.
  2. energy security: hydropower is the only renewable energy source currently deployed at scale
  3. food security: agriculture will face increasingly powerful demands to allocate water to urban, industrial and environmental services.
  4. urban development: droughts and floods will grow more intense and frequent in cities.