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  • Reply to: “The right data at the right time”: How to effectively communicate research to policy makers   1 week 4 days ago

    Thanks for this post.
    It strikes me as something that all of us working to influence public policy want to hear: that all of our evidence can indeed be put to good use.
    But I was very struck this week by an article from Baekegaard et al on motivated reasoning among politicians (in this case, in Denmark). (I had found an ungated copy but now can only find it here, sorry: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-political-science/article/role-of-evidence-in-politics-motivated-reasoning-and-persuasion-among-politicians/6813A080C058E1BB4920661FF60BED6F).
    It turns out that (Danish) politicians are more likely to interpret unambiguous data in a way that supports their (political) priors, and, perhaps even more surprisingly, that the more information they are given, the stronger this updating of priors is.
    In other words, "the right data at the right time... but only insofar as it fits my previous view of the world." Which is a very different problem to address.
    Friday food for thought.
    Cheers!
    Varja

  • Reply to: “The right data at the right time”: How to effectively communicate research to policy makers   1 week 4 days ago

    This is a very good spot on summary David. I have provided a link to my blog on the research I am working on so that additional insights can be gleaned from my work.

    https://www.brookings.edu/blog/education-plus-development/2017/08/08/how-can-jamaica-get-school-aged-mothers-back-in-school/

  • Reply to: Spending on bling: What explains the demand for status goods?   1 month 3 weeks ago

    Dear Rajeev,

     

    Thank you for your question – you raise a very interesting and important point! It is indeed true that banks have often been accused of strategically exploiting the behavioral biases of their customers. This is an issue that has gotten a lot of attention since the global financial crisis, and has led to much new thinking and increased efforts to improve transparency and financial consumer protection. That’s where our research comes in: we very much believe that to devise smart regulation that effectively protects consumers, we first need to understand the basic economic and non-economic factors that drive consumer behavior. We attempt to do this here for the case of status-seeking behavior, a fairly common phenomenon that affects all sorts of consumption choices, using the specific case of the market for credit cards.

  • Reply to: Fredo or Michael? Parents play favorites among siblings   2 months 2 days ago

    Great point Asif. Son preference was very much on our minds as we wrote this blog. Explicitly including the idea of 'insurance' would have been a nice touch.

  • Reply to: Fredo or Michael? Parents play favorites among siblings   2 months 3 days ago

    Dosn't the gender of the child matter?

    Son preference literature suggests parents act as an investment banker as well as an insurance company--they invest in the education of sons to get a share of their income and to guarantee retirement benefits.