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Tax policy should recognize the true value of user data

Davida Connon's picture

The latest revelations regarding covert data sharing practices by large tech companies demand governments finally take action to curb the unwanted exploitation of user data. To date, attention has been focused on privacy regulation; governments would be well served to look at tax policy, too. Digital taxes would better align taxation rights with value creation in the digital economy. They might also serve to communicate the growing frustration with abusive data management practices by the biggest offenders.

Holiday reading

Pinelopi Goldberg's picture
The holidays are upon us - a time to relax, see friends and family, and generally catch up. If you are anything like me then catching up will involve reading, so I thought that I’d share with you ten of my favorite papers in Development from 2018 (published and accepted for publication this year).  They reflect my own personal tastes rather than any specific external metric. Since this is the holiday season and a new year beckons, I have favored papers which convey messages of hope (tied to appropriate policies). Happy holidays and happy reading! 

Gig economy growth pains

Rong Chen's picture

The gig economy matches businesses to consumers through digital platforms. It serves local communities such as Tutorama, an Egyptian online platform connecting students with local private tutors. In Jordan, refugee women who have limited mobility are able to make a living by selling home-cooked dishes through Bilforon, a food-delivery platform. In 2018, more than five thousand women domestic workers earned income through SweepSouth, a home cleaning service platform in South Africa.

The role of the World Bank in filling gaps in the global risk architecture

Rasmus Heltberg's picture
In the World Development Report 2014 on Risk and Opportunity we discussed the need for collective action to prepare for, mitigate, and cope with risk. Our report called for more systematic risk preparation by households, communities, and nations. It also called for the international community to step in whenever risks cross borders or are likely to overwhelm countries’ capacity to cope.

New evidence on the challenge facing reform leaders should they join the Human Capital Project

Stuti Khemani's picture

Reform leaders who are persuaded by the need to invest in human capital face the challenge of getting thousands of state personnel, who staff myriad government agencies, to deliver. The quintessential “delivery unit” in Africa, a region flagged by the Human Capital Index as having the greatest need for health and education investments, consists of local governments helmed by appointed bureaucrats and locally elected politicians. In new research in Uganda, we find that the quality of local politicians, elected at humble levels in a village or district, is a robust and substantial predictor of delivery of national health programs. These results suggest that for the Human Capital Project to have impact it may need to move beyond creating political space for national leaders to allocate more public resources to health and education and take-on the challenge of local politics as key to service delivery at the last mile.

An individual look at poverty, across multiple dimensions

Isis Gaddis's picture

What we (don’t) know about gender gaps in multidimensional poverty …

Gender gaps are pervasive in many dimensions of well-being. Globally, almost two-thirds of the world’s illiterate adults are women, because of past (and sometimes present) gender inequalities in access to schooling. Women are also often more “time poor” than men due to the double burden of labor market activities and domestic chores and more “asset poor” due to gender biased laws, traditions and institutions.

Digitizing to succeed in MENA

Federica Saliola's picture

The Middle East and North Africa region have some of the best educated, unemployed people in the world. High-skill university graduates currently make up almost 30 percent of the unemployed pool of labor in MENA, many of them women. In Tunisia, slightly more than half of the working age population is out of work, the vast majority being women. Part of the problem is that, despite some economic growth, not enough new jobs are being created.

A light-touch method to improve accurate reporting of IDP’s food consumption

Utz Pape's picture

To design effective and durable relief programs for refugees and internally displaced people (IDPs), it is essential to understand the nature and context of the challenges the people living in these situations face. That’s why we have recently started to measure consumption and estimate rates of poverty among displaced populations. Through understanding the most acute challenges that vulnerable populations face, relief can be targeted to where support is needed most.

What can Netflix teach us about technology adoption?

Pallavi Shukla's picture

When video streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime offer a one month free subscription, they are offering potential users an opportunity to experience the benefits of having access to a wide range of entertainment options, weigh the benefits against the monthly subscription cost, and hopefully, promote adoption in the long run. Essentially, Netflix is providing us a short-run subsidy to promote long-run adoption. So, what can we learn from Netflix’s marketing strategy about promoting technology adoption in the field of development economics? We know that some technologies are experience goods and a one-time subsidy may promote experiential learning, leading to higher adoption in the long run. However, policymakers and practitioners often worry that providing large initial subsidies may set a wrong precedence, distort the expected price of a new technology and make people less likely to adopt and continue to use a technology once the subsidy is discontinued. What they are referring to is called reference dependence in prospect theory.

Precious metals outlook: regaining lustre?

Wee Chian Koh's picture

This blog is the ninth in a series of ten blogs on commodity market developments, elaborating on themes discussed in the latest edition of the World Bank’s Commodity Markets Outlook. Earlier blogs are here.
 
The World Bank’s Precious Metals Price Index is forecast to decline marginally in 2019, following an expected 2 percent loss in 2018. Gold prices are projected to edge marginally lower and silver prices to tick slightly higher, while platinum prices are anticipated to rebound moderately. Key risks to this outlook are U.S. monetary policy, the strength of the U.S. dollar, and global demand.
 
Precious metals price index

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