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September 2008

Two Who Won...

Tom Grubisich's picture

Among the 22 winning projects in the DM2008 competition was Agricultural Cooperatives for Biodiversity Conservation in Cambodia, and collecting the award were Enterprise Planner Adviser Karen Nielsen and Technical Adviser Tom Clements (in photo).

"W'e're quite excited about having our project recognized as one of the more innovative ones," said Nielsen, clutching her team's award.

Under the project, "Wildlife-friendly" products grown in conservation-protected areas in Cambodia will be marketed nationally, including at tourism centers, by cooperatives in 10 villages.

...And One Who Didn't

Tom Grubisich's picture

Subhas Managuli made it to the finalists' circle, buthis Best Practices Foundation proposal to improve livestock health for 2,000 small farmers in 20 villages in India didn't make the final cut that produced the 22 winners who were announced Friday morning.

"The idea is good, and I'll try to pitch it to other agencies," Managuli said as the closing ceremony wound up in the Atrium.  "I'm not going to give up. Absolutely."

3 Past Winners and the Lessons They Learned

Tom Grubisich's picture

Three DM2008 jurors who are past grant winners are sharing their well-learned lessons with the hundred finalists.

Take 2006 winner Florence Cassassuce (in photo at right), who brought her water-purifying UV-light bucket to 900 villagers on the rural outskirts of La Paz in Baja California, Mexcio. Cassassuce, implementing her project with the advice of World Bank Senior Environmental Specialist Ricardo Hernandez Murillo, installed 3,500 buckets toward the goal of 6,00, ahead of schedule. But the original buckets didn't always work well, especially in the field, and improvements had to be made with better, and faster, plastic-injection manufacturing.

ARD's Juergen Voegele on How the Bank Will Work With the Winners

Tom Grubisich's picture

As the recently named Director of the Agriculture and Rural Development Department -- one of DM2008's funders --Juergen Voegele is leading a vigorous effort to re-energize and broaden the World Bank's commitment to agricultural development. During his peripatetic rounds of the competition, Voegele sat down for this mini-interview:

Q. What are your impressions of what you see on the floor of the exhibition?

A Juror Describes the Final Winnowing Process

Tom Grubisich's picture

Among the 36 jurors for the DM2008 grant competition was Thomas Pomeroy, a former USDA bilateral trade director in key regions of the world who now consults in Sub-Saharan Africa. We did this mini-interview with Pomeroy:

 Q. As part of Team 10, you looked at 12 agribusiness proposals. What was your major criterion in scoring them?

Why GEF Is Backing DM2008

Tom Grubisich's picture

Monique Barbut, CEO and Chairwoman of the Global Environment Facility -- the largest funder of projects to improve the global environment and one of the funders of Development Markektplace 2008 -- talked about GEF's role in the grant competition.

Q. GEF deals with multimillion-dollar programs. DM2008's projects are in the $200,000 or less range. Why are they important to GEF?

The use of communication in development projects #2

Paolo Mefalopulos's picture

Communication is not just about communicating, at least not in the development context. My personal experiences, where I applied communication in a number of projects in different areas, such as agriculture, environment, rural development, etc., confirm what is cited also in relevant studies. Many of the failures in the development context can be attributed to two major factors: the lack of or insufficient involvement of stakeholders from the beginning of the initiative and the lack of or insufficient use of communication in the project activities.

Small Scale, but Potential Big Payoffs

Tom Grubisich's picture

Less-developed countries need many things – but, in most cases, nothing greater or more urgent than productive agriculture. Most of the world’s poorest people -- the 2.6 billion who try to survive on less than $2 a day – are family farmers whose small plots are unproductive and generally cut off from growing export markets. If these families could make the leap from subsistence to market-driven farming, world poverty would decline exponentially. It’s a big "if."

Making development projects more responsible

Joachim Ezeji's picture

Rural Africa Water Development Project (RAWDP), a Nigerian NGO, is currently promoting the Mor-sand filter in the restive oil rich Niger Delta region. The Mor-sand Filter, an improved adaptation of the slow-sand filter, integrates the combination of coagulation and filtration as effective processes for the reduction of the concentration of microorganisms in water.

DM grant: a stepping stone for social enterprises

Bart Weetjens's picture

Hi, I am Bart Weetjens, a social entrepreneur, and founder of the organization APOPO, with a vision of appropriate technologies to enhance the impact of humanitarian detection tasks. Basically we teach African communities how to train "HeroRATS", giant African pouched rats that are trained to save human lives by detecting landmines and diseases. In 2003, I was a DM winner.

Tips for DM participants: Be ambitious, Be innovative!

Scott Poynton's picture

As a past DM winner (2005), I’ve had the privilege of working with the DM Team and have very much enjoyed the experience of implementing our DM project. Tropical Forest Trust was successful in winning a DM grant for a project that aimed to implement new and really innovative ways of involving indigenous Pygmy communities in decisions around forest management that impact their lives.

Linking communities to markets

Melissa Williams's picture

Welcome to the blog!  Over the next several weeks I’ll be raising issues related to linking communities to markets and what some of us are doing to help them.  You know, about 10 years ago, I sent out an email to a mailing list of about 200 staff asking what they were doing to link rural communities to markets.  I got one response, which asked “Do you mean roads?”  We’ve come a long way in our thinking and in our practice since then.

The use of communication in development projects #1

Paolo Mefalopulos's picture

When I was asked to be one the blogger for the Development Marketplace I accepted without being too sure what was expected from me. I was told I should write something about communication, since this is not only my professional field, but something I am passionate about, I decided to start with two blogs about two key challenges that I have been facing and dealing with in the last few years of my professional life.

BOP Narrative Competition

Elena Altieri's picture

The Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise at Cornell University’s Johnson Graduate School of Management announces its 2008 Base of the Pyramid (BoP) Narrative Competition co-sponsored by USAID and Cornell’s BoP Learning Lab.  This short-essay competition seeks to highlight the challenges of implementing business in underserved markets and identify innovative business initiatives or solutions to those challenges.  Essays must be in English and submitted no later than midnight, October 5, 2008.  The first place winner will receive $4000 USD. For more details visit www.bopnetwork.org