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In New India Map, Ayllu Identifies 9 Constraints, Innovations to Reaching Scale

Melissa Richer and Juli Huang's picture

Scale For social entrepreneurs facing the myriad of challenges related to scaling up (not just financing), here’s a resource that may provide some insights. The Ayllu Initiative has recently launched the India Map, which portrays 24 social entrepreneurs’ perspectives on various growth challenges, and how they are innovating around them.

“This is the best example of what I love to call Indo-vation. This is India as not only a hotbed of technological innovation, it’s a hotbed of social innovation, and it’s a hotbed of business model innovation.” – Aleem Walji, manager of the Innovation Practice at World Bank Institute

Read through the article below from NextBillion for more details!

This article was originally published on http://www.nextbillion.net/. NextBillion is a website and blog bringing together a community in the shared mission of development through enterprise.


Image source: www.nextbillion.netAyllu is proud to announce the India Map. Just launched at SOCAP 11, the map examines, through the perspective of entrepreneurs, key scaling challenges and innovations. Sponsored by Potencia Ventures (formerly Artemisia International), the map focuses on what constraints enterprises across sectors in India face to understand the contexts in which they work, establish their business models, and scale up their operations and impact. Ayllu identified 9 major scaling constraints as well as innovations, which are illustrated by hundreds of case examples. The map format is consistent with the Energy Map we released in May; we want the case studies and data to speak for themselves. Users can easily and quickly search within it for information that is most relevant to them.

Less than 24 hours left to vote!!! - Vote for Your Favorite Social Entrepreneur in the World Challenge!

Myra Valenzuela's picture

The voting period for BBC World New's World Challenge sustainability competition closes this Friday at 11.50 PM (GMT).

You can check out the videos here and cast you vote before midnight tomorrow at: http://www.theworldchallenge.co.uk/

The projects need your help for a chance to win $40,000 of prizes!

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This week, public voting for the BBC’s World Challenge 2011 opened. Twelve social enterprises from around the world, ranging from Cambodia to Chile, are competing for YOUR votes to win a US$20,000 grant from Shell, with two runners-up receiving US$10,000 apiece. You can get to know them by watching their videos online at http://www.youtube.com/user/bbcworldchallenge , following their profiles on BBC World News television, and studying their advertorials in Newsweek.

The “Missing Middle” and the Growth of Social Enterprises

Aleem Walji's picture

SOCAP (via amsterdam.wordpress.the-hub.net)Every fall at Social Capital Markets (SOCAP), the who’s who of impact investing and social enterprise convene in San Francisco to network and share stories about topics like market-based solutions to poverty, social stock exchanges, and just how much capital is waiting to be deployed to solve the world’s toughest problems. It’s inspiring to be sure, especially the growth in the number and diversity of participation. It’s no longer the sole domain of Ashoka, Skoll, and Schwab who have paved the way for so many others. Today, mainstream Banks from Europe to Asia, fund managers, and wealth advisors are sending a signal that doing good and doing well is a more enlightened form of capitalism.

But behind all the feel-good energy and promises that impact investing will be a $50 billion industry by 2020, there are gaps in the story line and challenges that we must confront as a community. First, there is no clear definition of an impact investor. The industry brings together those who are primarily driven by a financial bottom line (finance first) with those who are seeking to optimize a social return without making a loss (impact first), and finally grant makers who are aiming to improve the efficiency of philanthropic capital (largely foundations). Their world views are different, their expected returns are different, and how they use the same vocabulary (e.g. impact, viability, and sustainability) varies widely.

$1,000 Resource Competition - Deadline Extended!

Dougg Jimenez's picture

Deadline Extended!!
Submit your resources by October 21st
Social entrepreneurs create tools to help them address both social and business needs.
Now, you can WIN CASH for sharing these tools!

Biometrics for Tuberculosis Management

Dr. Shelly Batra's picture

(Blog originally posted in the Innovation Alchemy Blog)

The Team at OperationASHA apply Biometrics to manage Tuberculosis Medication in Slums and demonstrate a dramatic impact in reducing instances of multi drug resistant TB.

“There is a tide in the affairs of men, which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune,” so said Shakespeare, believing, as I do, that one can bring about a change by acting as a catalyst. There are a lot of things that exist disparately, which, when combined at the right time by the right people, create a revolution.

I have worked as a medical specialist for several years. Over the years, I have witnessed every kind of human misery. I have worked under challenging conditions in understaffed, overcrowded public hospitals, where life was a constant war against infection and anemia. I have even performed emergency Caesarian sections by candlelight! The worst cases were those where because of an ailment, indignities would be heaped upon the patient, and social discrimination would raise its ugly head. These were truly those who suffer, for they would have no food, no shelter, no family, no treatment, only pain and suffering. Tuberculosis (TB) is one such disease where patients have to face horrifying discrimination and violation of human rights.

A $450 house for only $5 a month – no interest paid.

Kirsten Spainhower's picture

Photo credit: International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR)What’s the catch? It seems too good to be true but a 2009 DM winner, International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR), has successfully developed a bamboo prototype and payment scheme that is affordable and appealing to the poor.

The project entitled "Elevated Bamboo Houses designed to Lift Communities above Flood Zones" is being implemented in Ecuador and it is already being considered a victory. Even before the project has completed its funding cycle with the DM, the European Commission and Common Fund for Commodities have contributed €1,647,959 and $2,007,300 respectively so the project can scale up.

Women Visionaries Driving Vietnam's Green Future

Dr. Ivan Kennedy's picture

In Vietnam, several women with extraordinary vision have been the technological leaders in agricultural innovation. From the laboratory, to the factory, to the farm, women have been the pioneers along every link of the supply chain in this project calledSustaining nitrogen-efficient rice production.”

Under the DM in early March 2011, Agriculture Green Future (AGF), a non-profit organization devoted to promoting sustainable fertilizer, was founded on the research of the only female soil scientists in Vietnam: Phan Thi Cong (pictured).

Professor Nguyen Thanh Hien, BioGro inventor and Dr Phan Thi Cong, project leaderAGF promotes the manufacture and use of BioGro, a microbial bio-fertiliser invented in the 1990s by Professor Nguyen Thanh Hien (also pictured). AGF provides starter cultures and training in quality control to BioGro manufacturers, while promoting the BioGro brand. Phan Thi Cong, who continues to advance the BioGro technology, represents a younger generation positioned to carry this work forward.

The Story of Neeraj and Amit

Dougg Jimenez's picture

To highlight the work of social entrepreneurs, this animated video tells the story of a relationship between an Indian householder and a young social entrepreneur. In the story, the householder, Neeraj, is given the opportunity to pull himself out of poverty through the intervention of Amit, a social entrepreneur. The video tells of one man's journey from destitution, picking rags from a garbage heap, to owning a business of his own.

2012 $100,000 Lemelson-MIT Award for Global Innovation

Dougg Jimenez's picture

Man fishing in the SudanThe Lemelson-MIT Award for Global Innovation recognizes individuals whose technological innovations improve the lives of impoverished people in the developing world. The Lemelson-MIT Award for Global Innovation celebrates outstanding technology-focused innovators who have improved quality of life in the areas of health, shelter, energy, agriculture, quality of air, water, soil, education, or ecosystem management in developing nations and have disseminated technology that is scalable or replicable.

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