Syndicate content

Health

Addressing the silence around menstruation through partnership and positive association

Jaydeep Mandal's picture

As urban India strives to emerge as the next superpower, rural India continues to suffer in the absence of access to adequate health and hygiene facilities.

Hygiene and health go hand-in-hand. Maintaining proper hygiene is indispensible for maintaining good health and this holds true for women undergoing menstruation. Although menstruation is a natural process, there are several misconceptions and practices, which sometimes results in adverse health outcomes. In India, the problem is much more prevalent and accentuated in rural parts of the country. Lack of awareness and the stigma around menstruation causes women to refrain from seeking medical advice. Serious infections are often left untreated. Women across our country are forced into silence, and thus, into unhealthy behaviors.

In order to create the necessary behavior change needed to ensure healthy menstruation practices we strictly do not touch the myths and taboos connected with menstruation. Given that many of these taboos are connected to local cultures and religions, addressing these taboos would create a barrier to open discussion as target communities could feel under attack. Forming a positive discussion around how menstruation is normal, can be clean, and providing multiple options for sanitary pads for these women is far more impactful than shame.

Pitfalls and stumbling blocks: the challenge to being a social enterprise (part 2)

Dr. Shelly Batra's picture
Ask anyone who has started a social enterprise what their biggest challenge would be, and I bet they would mention something about a regulatory framework. As mentioned in my previous blog, government regulations can be tedious, burdensome, and difficult to wade through.

"Every time I see a problem, I create a social business to solve it"

Marta Milkowska's picture

(c) Marta Milkowska“Every time I see a problem, I create a social business to solve it,” renowned Nobel Prize laureate Muhammad Yunus said to an overflowing room at the World Bank Group’s Headquarters in Washington, DC this summer. “Set up a social business.”

“The poor are like Bonsai trees,” the founder of Grameen Bank explained, “When you plant the best seed of the tallest tree in a six-inch-deep flower pot, you get a perfect replica of the tallest tree, but it is only inches tall. There is nothing wrong with the seed you planted; only the soil-base you provided was inadequate. Poor people are bonsai people. There is nothing wrong with their seeds. Only society never gave them a base to grow on."

How to improve social enterprises so they can scale? eLearning

Alexandra Endara's picture

Earlier this year, we launched our eLearning course for social enterprises in January with a second installment in May. Social enterprises from across the globe – from places we didn’t even think we could reach – applied. So we began to wonder, who are these social enterprises? What are their models? What do they need most to reach the most marginalized populations? So I sat down with Charles Njemo Batumani and Arun Kumar Das, two social entrepreneurs who finished the first installment of our eLearning course in January to see what they’ve done, where they see their enterprises going and why eLearning was a way for them to improve their social enterprise. Charles is building affordable housing for low and middle income earners in Limbe, Cameroon while Arun is developing a natural plant product to combat malnutrition in Odisha, India.

Bridging the public-private divide to scale-up health solutions: the story of VillageReach

Elaine Tinsley's picture

After a day of discussions on how to scale social enterprise innovations to improve health outcomes during an event hosted by the World Bank Group’s (WBG) Innovation Labs and Health Global Practice on June 8th, one clear message emerged – public-private dialogue and collaboration, as well as collaboration between the public sector, the private sector and multilateral organizations such as the WBG is required to reach those living at the last mile.   

A prime example of this need  can be seen in a mobile phone health clinic program developed by VillageReach, a social enterprise working to provide access to quality health care to underserved communities through an integrated approach.

Ensuring the End User is at the Core of a Business Model: Why I Chose to Be a Social Enterprise

Dr. Parveez Ubed's picture

There is a perfect start, there is a less than perfect start and there is an imperfect start. As a social entrepreneur, the thing I have learned is that it pays to START- even if it’s less than perfect or imperfect.

So, there I was, I had left my job, had no savings, but kept people like Bonti in my mind. But, I had no idea how, or even where to start. 

Eye Research Center (ERC) Eye Care was officially founded in the summer of 2011. With the generous help of my mother, we were just one clinic – in her kitchen – in the heart of the city. Although we had a strong mission, we quickly realized that to the outside world, there was nothing to differentiate us from other ophthalmic clinics spread across the city. But what exactly was ERC Eye Care? We had initially set it up as a sole proprietorship, as it was the cheapest and easiest registration process, but we weren’t strictly a for-profit business. Were we a NGO? Or were we something else entirely?

Can we see ‘a’ patient with tuberculosis?

Dr. Shelly Batra's picture

 World Bank Photo CollectionBack in the 1970s, I was a medical student ready to take on the world. We had a student exchange program, where students from across the world would come to India to visit and learn. One year, there was a group of young doctors from the UK who were excited to be somewhere they could observe ‘rare diseases.’ Seeing the packed hospitals on rounds, they eagerly asked the Professor of Internal Medicine, “May we see a patient with tuberculosis?” The Professor, uncertain of their excitement, replied frankly, “Of course. We don’t just have one, we have wards and wards full!” Tuberculosis (TB) – the infectious disease that primarily targets the lungs - was, and continues to be, anything but a rare disease in India.

2014 India DM Finalist Story: iKure - Paving the Way to Accessible and Affordable Healthcare through Software Development

Carolyn Marie Florey's picture

We traveled down a bumpy, dirt road in the rural areas of West Bengal towards a village called Bolpur. Three hours after leaving Kolkata, the car pulled up to an unassuming concrete building. The health care worker who accompanied us for this ride jumped out enthusiastically and immediately spoke into her megaphone. “Not feeling well?” she called out to the village, “Need a quick check up? Come and visit us for the next hour and a half.” Here, in a small village, at an unassuming building, we had found ourselves at an iKure spot camp.

iKure -  a Kolkata-based social enterprise dedicated to bringing affordable health care to India’s poorest populations -  has created these spot camps as an integral part of their inventive model for a network of health clinics in India’s rural areas. In addition to providing access to doctors and medicine prescriptions, they provide the necessary outreach to tell villagers about where and when the clinics are and how they can access medical consultations and medicine.

Turning on the Spigot for Crisp, Clear Water

On a warm Friday afternoon in the slums of Madhukam, in the heart of Ranchi, India, a middle-aged man arrived at a public water station with two 20-liter containers to fill. The water station - directly adjacent to an open sewage drain - was really just a concerete wall with four pink spigots protruding from its barren surface. On top perched two large, seemingly empty holding tanks of water. The man placed one of his containers under the first spigot and turned the handle. A small flow of water came out. Within a minute, the flow turned into a trickle, and the trickle quickly became nothing. The man moved to the next spigot, and then the next, only to have all four repeat the same pattern. In the end, the man left carrying only six ounces of water in his two 20-liter containers.

Furniture from Palm Trees, Honey Production and Bringing back “Ferka” Weaving

Hartwig Schafer's picture

How we support agribusiness and handicrafts sector in Upper Egypt

Mr. Hartwig Schafer, Country Director for the World Bank meets Egypt DM Grantees.Last week I met 35 entrepreneurs from Assyut, Aswan, Beni Seouf, Cairo, Fayoum, Giza, Luxor , Minya, Qena, Sharkeyya, Sohag. Some of these names aren’t familiar and there is a reason for that…

They had just been awarded 25,000 dollars each through the Egypt Development Marketplace (DM) competition because their businesses have potential to grow, and create jobs for some of the most vulnerable and marginalized people in Upper Egypt.

I was struck by the new innovative ideas for example using palm trees to produce handicrafts and high quality affordable furniture. But also by the revival of local industries such as the ancient Upper Egyptian carpet weaving produced by ferka, not only generating income for marginalized girls and women, but also renewing pride in Egypt’s remarkable culture and heritage. Whether producing local honey, or adding value to products through food processing of tomato paste, olive oil or dairy products specifically for low-income families, these businesses had deserved their cash reward.

Pages