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Upcoming Deadline: Skoll Awards for Social Entrepreneurship

Elena Altieri's picture

Application deadline:
November 4, 2008

The Skoll Foundation announces that November 4, 2008 is the deadline for receipt of applications for the Skoll Awards for Social Entrepreneurship. The Foundation is looking for social entrepreneurs whose work has the potential for large-scale positive change in the areas of tolerance and human rights, health, environmental sustainability, peace and security, institutional responsibility, and economic and social equity.  Within these issues, it is particularly interested in applications from social entrepreneurs working in five critical sub-issue areas that threaten the survival of humanity – climate change, nuclear proliferation, pandemics, conflict in the Middle East and water scarcity. Award winners will be celebrated at the annual Skoll World Forum following their selection, at the end of March 2009 in Oxford, England.

Scaling up – going from project success to paradigm shift

Scott Poynton's picture

Once you complete your project, there’ll be time for reflection and celebration but not too much! Likely your project has successfully piloted a new innovation but it remains just that, a pilot. Peoples’ lives will have been changed and you’ll have learned an enormous amount, so now the challenge is to have an even bigger impact by helping change the existing paradigm in your field or in the region where you work.

Global Green Energy Awards: international entries needed by 21 October 2008

Elena Altieri's picture

Application deadline:
21 October 2008!
When it comes to developing cleaner, sustainable energy solutions, some of the most ingenious and practical ideas are coming out of rural communities in the developing world. Every year, small enterprises in Africa, Asia and Latin America apply for the Ashden Awards and win the chance to bring their sustainable energy solutions into the international arena.

When you do win, then the hard work starts

Scott Poynton's picture

I’ve been reflecting on further lessons learned from our project that I could share with everyone. I’ve come up a number and they’re all interlinked. The first is that inevitably when you’re implementing innovative projects in complex contexts, you’re going to need to work with partners.

Two Who Won...

Tom Grubisich's picture

Among the 22 winning projects in the DM2008 competition was Agricultural Cooperatives for Biodiversity Conservation in Cambodia, and collecting the award were Enterprise Planner Adviser Karen Nielsen and Technical Adviser Tom Clements (in photo).

"W'e're quite excited about having our project recognized as one of the more innovative ones," said Nielsen, clutching her team's award.

Under the project, "Wildlife-friendly" products grown in conservation-protected areas in Cambodia will be marketed nationally, including at tourism centers, by cooperatives in 10 villages.

...And One Who Didn't

Tom Grubisich's picture

Subhas Managuli made it to the finalists' circle, buthis Best Practices Foundation proposal to improve livestock health for 2,000 small farmers in 20 villages in India didn't make the final cut that produced the 22 winners who were announced Friday morning.

"The idea is good, and I'll try to pitch it to other agencies," Managuli said as the closing ceremony wound up in the Atrium.  "I'm not going to give up. Absolutely."