Syndicate content

June 2017

The Philippines: Resurrecting Manufacturing in a Services Economy

Birgit Hansl's picture
In recent years, the Philippines has ranked among the world's fastest-growing economies but needs to adjust to the demands of a dynamic global economy.

The Philippines is at a fork in the road. Despite good results on the growth front, trends observed in trade competitiveness, Global Value Chain (GVC) integration and product space evolution, send worrisome signals. The country has solid fundamentals and remarkable human assets to leapfrog into the 4th Industrial Revolution – where the distinction between goods and services have become obsolete. Yet it does not get the most out of this growth, especially with regards to long-term development prospects. In order to do so, the government will have to make the right policy choices.

A Greener Growth Path to Sustain Thailand’s Future

Ulrich Zachau's picture
Also available in: ภาษาไทย

Global experience shows that growing first and cleaning up later rarely works. Rather, it is in countries’ interest to prioritize green and clean growth. This also holds true for Thailand, a country with rich natural resources contributing significantly to its wealth.

According to World Bank data, annual natural resource depletion in Thailand accounted for 4.4 percent of Gross National Income in 2012, and it has been rising rapidly since 2002. The rate of depletion is comparable to other countries in the East Asia and Pacific region, but it is almost three times faster than the rate in the 1980s. 

Rapid natural resource depletion in Thailand is increasingly visible in reduced forest areas. Illegal logging and smuggling have led to a decline from 171 million rai of forested area in 1961 to 107.6 million rai in 2009. Coastal communities face erosion, ocean waste, and illegal, destructive fishing. The coasts are also increasingly vulnerable to storm surges and sea level rise, due to continued destruction of mangroves and coral reefs.

Gender mainstreaming in resettlement processes: Have we done enough?

Nghi Quy Nguyen's picture
A Thai woman in a consultation meeting in Trung Son
Hydropower Project. Photo: Mai Bo / World Bank

Last August, I visited Quang Ngai, a central coastal province in Vietnam, to collect data for a survey on women’s participation in resettlement activities. I expected our first meeting with the local community to be short and uncontroversial. It wasn’t.

“We, women? Our participation? It doesn’t matter. We all stay at home. We don’t care about you coming here and asking about our participation,” said one female participant. “What we do care is to know the extent to which the recommendations we make today will be addressed. We need a resettlement site with community house, trees and kindergarten as promised during the project preparation.” 

That comment brought to light an important perspective, highlighting the tension between what we might expect women to want, and their actual needs.

The impacts of development-induced resettlement disproportionately affect women, as they are faced with more difficulties than men to cope with disruption to their families. And this is particularly the case if there is no mechanism to enable meaningful participation and consultation with women throughout the project cycle in general and in the resettlement process in particular.

Các ưu tiên thúc đẩy tài chính toàn diện tại Việt Nam: Mở rộng dịch vụ tài chính và hướng tới một nền kinh tế không dùng tiền mặt

Ceyla Pazarbasioglu's picture
Also available in: English
 



Trời đã về đêm nhưng đường phố tại các thành phố và thị xã tại Việt Nam vẫn nhộn nhịp. Nền kinh tế tăng trưởng mạnh mẽ trong nhiều năm đã làm xuất hiện một tầng lớp trung lưu mới với khả năng chi tiêu nhiều hơn cho các hàng quán mở cửa tới thâu đêm, các cửa hàng bán lẻ lúc nào cũng đông khách và tỉ lệ sở hữu điện thoại di động ở mức cao—trung bình mỗi người có trên một máy điện thoại di động. Tuy nhiên, nền kinh tế vẫn dựa trên giao dịch bằng tiền mặt, phần đông người trong độ tuổi trưởng thành vẫn không sử dụng dịch vụ tài chính chính thức, ví dụ sử dụng tài khoản giao dịch. Chuyển sang hệ thống không dùng tiền mặt chính là một ưu tiên trong quá trình nâng cao hiệu quả, thúc đẩy phát triển kinh doanh và kinh tế, giảm nghèo tại những vùng nông thôn hẻo lánh nơi các nhà cung cấp dịch vụ tài chính truyền thống khó vươn tới.

Kể từ năm 2016 Ngân hàng Nhà nước Việt Nam đã hợp tác cùng Nhóm Ngân hàng Thế giới hướng tới  xây dựng một chiến lược quốc gia về  tài chính toàn diện trên cơ sở một cách tiếp cận tổng thể. Mặc dù chiến lược này hiện vẫn đang còn trong quá trình xây dựng nhưng một số điểm chính đã được xác định rõ: chú trọng tài chính trên nền tảng công nghệ số bao gồm chuyển các chương trình thanh toán của chính phủ sang sử dụng các dịch vụ và nền tảng công nghệ số ; cung cấp dịch vụ tài chính tới các vùng nông thôn và dân tộc thiểu số còn lạc hậu và tỉ lệ nghèo còn cao hơn tỷ lệ nghèo bình quân cả nước;  và tăng cường bảo vệ người tiêu dùng và phổ biến kiến thức tài chính giúp thế hệ người tiêu dùng mới được trang bị tốt hơn với dịch vụ tài chính hiện đại.

Three things to know about migrant workers and remittances in Malaysia

Isaku Endo's picture


Migrants represent 15% of Malaysia’s workforce, making the country home to the fourth largest number of migrants in the East Asia Pacific region. The migrant population is diverse, made up of workers from Indonesia, Bangladesh, Nepal, Myanmar, Vietnam, China and India, among many other countries.