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Lao People's Democratic Republic

Departing thoughts on NT2: The simple importance of information

Nanda Gasparini's picture

It’s now that time for me when you have to sit down and write goodbye and thank you emails, throw away all those trees you’ve cut over the years (that would be paper), wrap up work, pack up your stuff and say goodbye.

Economics of Sanitation

Jaehyang So's picture

Most of us in the development community are aware that proper water and sanitation services are crucial for life and health. Proper sanitation especially can decrease the instances and spread of disease. But in making the case to Ministers of Finance, it is often the economic and financial case that we have to make in order to garner the investments needed to make a difference.

A Water and Sanitation Program report we released last month, called Economic Impact of Sanitation in Indonesia (pdf), makes that case for that country. The report says that the economic costs of poor hygiene and sanitation in Indonesia reached an estimated US$6.3 billion, or 2.3 percent of GDP in 2006.

Multiple realities around Nam Theun 2’s successes and problems

William Rex's picture

It’s been a while since I’ve contributed anything to this blog – many thanks to Nanda for holding the fort. Over the last 6 weeks I’ve done five trips to various parts of the NT2 project, and am starting to feel in need of salt – more on that later.

NT2 - Compensating villagers for direct losses from the project

Nanda Gasparini's picture

As I made my way down route 13 last week I wondered how many times I had been to Nam Theun 2 since my first visit in October 2006. I’m certainly not one of the people that go there the most, and yet I could recall at least 20 visits.

NT2: Not a World Bank hydropower project

William Rex's picture

A few weeks ago I wrote that “many perceive NT2 to be a World Bank hydropower project. From my perspective, that’s inaccurate in every respect. More on that in a future posting.” Following intense pressure from my reading public (thanks, Nanda), it’s time to explain what I meant.

An English vicar and the frog with no lungs

Tony Whitten's picture

Priests and vicars have long demonstrated a penchant for biodiversity. There have been missionaries in remote places who have built up and preserved beautiful collections of butterflies, plants etc. which eventually found their way into the great natural history museums of the world.  The Rev.

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