Syndicate content

Vietnam

Fighting climate change: What I Learned from WBG President and 22 Vietnamese Youngsters

Giang Huong Nguyen's picture
Also available in: Tiếng Việt
Jim Yong Kim to Vietnamese Youth: What's Your Plan to Tackle Climate Change?
World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim listened to a group of more than 20 young Vietnamese environmental activists sharing their initiatives on fighting climate change. He challenged them to work together to build a bigger plan to both adapt to climate change and tackle the issue that Vietnam's carbon intensity will increase 20%.



“How you can live and adapt to climate change… How you can together tackle the issue of carbon intensity of Vietnam?”World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim challenged 22 young Vietnamese environmentalists, including myself, at a roundtable discussion on the impacts of climate change to Vietnam during his visit to the country. Around that time, Vietnam and some neighboring countries were hit by typhoon Rammasun. It could have been a coincidence, but it gave us a sense of urgency and how serious the issue of climate change is.

East Asia and Pacific countries can do better in labor regulation and social protection

Truman Packard's picture

Those unfamiliar with the fast growing emerging economies of East Asia are likely to think that governments in these countries let market forces and capitalism roam free, red in tooth and claw. That was certainly my impression before coming to work in the region, and generally that held at the outset of our work by the group of us that wrote a new World Bank report “East Asia Pacific At Work: Employment, Enterprise and Wellbeing” .

The report shows just how wrong we were. We could be forgiven this impression—many of us had come from assignments in Latin America and the Caribbean or in Europe and Central Asia, where the distortions and rigidities from labor regulation and poorly designed social protection are rife, and where policy makers cast envious looks at the stellar and sustained employment outcomes in East Asia.

Well, it turns out that although they came relatively late to labor regulation and social protection, many governments in the region have entered this arena with gusto. We were surprised to find that, going just by what is written in their labor codes, the average level of employment protection in East Asia is actually higher than the OECD average.

Does Women’s Leadership in Vietnam Matter?

Victoria Kwakwa's picture
Also available in: Tiếng Việt
High primary enrollment ratios for girls and impressive female labour force participation rates are two striking examples of Vietnam’s progress on gender equality. On female leadership, however, Vietnam has a huge unfinished agenda. The good news is that a recent study by Grant Thornton (2013) shows women’s leadership in business is growing and 30 percent of Board of Director roles in Vietnam are held by women compared to the global average of 19 percent. Women’s membership in the Communist Party has also risen from over 20 percent in 2005 to more than 30 percent in 2010.   The not so good news is that across business, government and political spheres, the face of leadership in Vietnam is still overwhelmingly male. 

In the last decade and a half, the share of women in the National Assembly has been declining. Only one out of nine chairs of National Assembly Committees is female. Women’s representation remains low in key bodies of the Communist Party: the Politburo (two out of 16), the Central Committee and the Secretariat.  In Government, the civil service has a large percentage of women but their representation in leadership is small and tends to be at lower levels: 11 percent at the division level, 5 percent at director level and only 3 percent at ministerial level (UNDP, 2012).

But should we be concerned about getting higher levels of women in leadership? Is this just about “political correctness” or can having more women in leadership in business, government and politics benefit Vietnam’s development?
 

Vai trò lãnh đạo của phụ nữ tại Việt Nam quan trọng như thế nào?

Victoria Kwakwa's picture
Also available in: English

Việt nam đã đạt được những tiến bộ rất đáng khích lệ trong bình đẳng giới như tỉ lệ đi học của trẻ em gái và tỉ lệ của lao động nữ trong lực lượng lao động rất cao. Cuối năm 2013 chúng ta có một tin vui là một nghiên cứu của Grant Thornton, cho thấy phụ nữ Việt nam ngày càng nắm nhiều vị trí lãnh đạo trong các doanh nghiệp. Tỉ lệ nữ trong hội đồng quản trị tại các doanh nghiệp Việt Nam là 30% trong khi tỉ lệ trung bình toàn cầu là 19%. Tỉ lệ đảng viên nữ trong Đảng Cộng sản Việt Nam cũng tăng từ 25% năm 2005 lên 30% năm 2010. Tuy vậy, đa số các vị trí lãnh đạo doanh nghiệp, chính quyền và đời sống chính trị vẫn là nam giới. Xét chung về vai trò của phụ nữ trên các cương vị lãnh đạo thì còn nhiều việc cần làm.  

Tỉ lệ nữ trong Quốc hội giảm dần trong thập niên vừa qua. Trong số 9 người đứng đầu các ủy ban của Quốc hội, chỉ có 1 là nữ. Số phụ nữ trong các cơ quan quan trọng nhất của Đảng như Bộ Chính chị, Ban chấp hành trung ương và Ban bí thư còn rất thấp (chỉ có 2 nữ trong số 16 ủy viên Bộ Chính trị). Về phía chính quyền, tuy tỉ lệ nữ công chức lớn, nhưng tỉ lệ lãnh đạo nữ lại khá thấp và ở cấp thấp: tỉ lệ lãnh đạo nữ cấp phòng là 11%, cấp sở là 5% và cấp bộ là 3% (UNDP, 2012).

Câu hỏi đặt ra là liệu chúng ta có nên coi vấn đề có thêm nhiều phụ nữ vào cương vị lãnh đạo là quan trọng không? Cần làm như vậy cho “phải phép” hay liệu việc nhiều phụ nữ tham gia lãnh đạo doanh nghiệp, chính quyền và đời sống chính trị thực sự mang lại lợi ích cho quá trình phát triển của đất nước?
 

Điều gì lý giải cho kết quả ấn tượng của Việt Nam trong kỳ thi PISA 2012?

Christian Bodewig's picture
Also available in: English
Kết quả của kỳ thi PISA 2012 - Chương trình đánh giá học sinh quốc tế (Program for international Student Assessment) cho thấy hệ thống giáo dục phổ thông của Việt Nam thành công hơn khá nhiều các hệ thống giáo dục ở các quốc gia giàu có hơn,xét trên khả năng cung cấp cho học sinh những kỹ năng nhận thức cơ bản như đọc, viết và tính toán.

What explains Vietnam’s stunning performance in PISA 2012?

Christian Bodewig's picture
Also available in: Tiếng Việt
The results from the Program for international Student Assessment (PISA) 2012 show that Vietnam’s general education system is more successful than systems in many wealthier countries in providing students with strong basic cognitive skills such as reading literacy and numeracy. Participating for the first time in PISA, Vietnam’s 15 year-olds perform on par with their peers in Germany and Austria and better than those in two thirds of participating countries.

There is no such thing as a free… condom: social marketing to prevent HIV/AIDS in Vietnam

Nguyen Thi Mai's picture
Also available in: Tiếng Việt
Vietnam: Fighting HIV/AIDS Starts with Better Access to Prevention


In the early 1990s, selling condoms was highly controversial in Vietnam. For so long, condoms had been distributed to each household throughout the country for free for family planning use only. Condoms were not used for promoting safe sex. It was extremely difficult to convince the media to advertise condoms, very hard to convince the government that it was possible to generate revenue from selling condoms. People found it embarrassing to buy condoms in shops or drugs stores.
 

Sẽ không còn bao cao su phát miễn phí...: Tiếp thị xã hội để phòng chống HIV/AIDS tại Việt Nam

Nguyen Thi Mai's picture
Also available in: English
Việt Nam: Nâng cao tiếp cận với phòng chống HIV/AIDS để chống lại căn bệnh nguy hiểm


Vào đầu những năm 1990,  tiếp thị xã hội bao cao su là một vấn đề gây nhiều tranh cãi ở Việt Nam. Trong một thời gian dài, bao cao su được phát miễn phí phục vụ mục đích kế hoạch hóa gia đình. Bao cao su chưa được đề cập như một biện pháp về tình dục an toàn. Thuyết phục giới truyền thông quảng cáo bao cao su là cực kỳ khó khăn, và việc thuyết phục chính phủ rằng có thể bán bao cao su trợ giá cũng là điều rất khó. Ai cũng cảm thấy ngượng và lúng túng khi mua bao cao su tại hiệu thuốc.
 

Why is ethnic minority poverty persistent in Vietnam?

Gabriel Demombynes's picture
Also available in: Tiếng Việt
What will it take to end poverty in Vietnam?



A few months ago, I journeyed to Lao Cai, a predominantly ethnic minority area in Vietnam’s Northern Mountains, to supervise a pilot survey. One older man I encountered—typical of many we saw—was a subsistence farmer with minimal education who spoke only his native language and had barely ventured beyond his village.

Members of ethnic minority groups make up 15 percent of the country’s population but account for 70 percent of the extreme poor (measured using a national extreme poverty line). During Vietnam’s two decades of rapid growth, members of ethnic minority groups in the country have experienced overall improvements in their standards of living, but their gains have lagged behind those of the Kinh majority.

Why is ethnic minority poverty persistent? This has been the subject of numerous studies, including a 2009 study on ethnicity and development in Vietnam as well as a chapter in our more recent Vietnam Poverty Assessment. This is also one piece of the research my team is currently pursuing.

Pages