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East Asia and Pacific

Masyarakat bersatu membangun pasca bencana alam

George Soraya's picture
Also available in: English



Setelah gempa bumi besar di Yogyakarta, Indonesia, pada tahun 2006, kawasan kota dan sekitarnya harus membangun kembali atau memperbaiki sekitar 300 ribu rumah.
 
Pemerintah punya pilihan menyewa 1.000 kontraktor yang masing-masing akan membangun 300 rumah, atau mengerahkan 300 ribu anggota masyarakat untuk masing-masing membangun satu rumah, rumah mereka sendiri.
 
Dengan pemerintah sebagai pemimpin proses rekonstruksi, mengambil pilihan kedua dalam mendukung program pemerintah. Ini adalah cara kerja REKOMPAK.
 

Indonesia: Turning to unity for rebuilding communities after natural disasters

George Soraya's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



Following the massive earthquake in Jogjakarta, Indonesia, in 2006, the city and surrounding areas were faced with having to build or rehabilitate about 300-thousand homes.

The government had the option of hiring 1,000 contractors to build 300 houses each.  Or we could have 300 thousand people working to build one house each - their own homes. 

With the Government of Indonesia in the lead, we took the latter approach in supporting Indonesia’s efforts to rebuild communities. This is the REKOMPAK way.

Transformasi struktural Indonesia beri petunjuk di mana lapangan kerja yang bagus

Maria Monica Wihardja's picture
Also available in: English



Pepatah mengatakan “Hidup bagaikan roda – kadang di atas, kadang di bawah”.

Era ‘booming komoditas’ ketika harga minyak mentah, kelapa sawit dan batu bara melambung tinggi sudah berakhir. Sudah seyogyanya hal ini ini menjadi lampu kuning bagi Indonesia, karena peralihan ekonomi ini telah mempengaruhi pertumbuhan lapangan kerja dalam beberapa tahun terakhir. Lalu, bagaimana Indonesia bisa terus menciptakan lapangan kerja baru untuk pencari tenaga kerjanya yang terus bertambah?

Jawabannya ada di sektor manufaktur dan jasa, seperti yang sudah terindikasi oleh pola sejarah yang ada.

Dalam waktu 20 tahun terakhir (di luar era krisis ekonomi di tahun 1997-1999), sektor manufaktur dan jasa menjadi sumber penting lapangan kerja baru di tengah menurunnya jumlah pekerjaan di sektor pertanian. Dari tahun 1999-2015, proporsi pekerjaan di bidang pertanian turun menjadi 34% dari 56%, dari total lapangan kerja, sedangkan sektor jasa mengalami kenaikan menjadi 54% dari 34% dan sektor manufaktur naik dari 10% menjadi 13%. 

Indonesia’s structural transformation offers clues on where to find good jobs

Maria Monica Wihardja's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



What goes up must come down.

The end of the commodities boom is a wake-up call for Indonesia, as the reversal in economic transformation has adversely impacted employment growth in recent years. How can Indonesia continue to create jobs for its growing labor force?

Jobs in manufacturing and services offer a solution, as historical patterns of job creation have shown.

In the past 20 years (excluding the economic crisis of 1997-1999), manufacturing and services have been important sources of job creation, while employment in agriculture continues to decline. From 1990 to 2015, jobs in agriculture fell to 34% from 56% of all employment, while service sector work has surged to 53% from 34%, and manufacturing jobs have increased from 10% to 13%.

เยาวชนไทยคิดอย่างไรกับการพัฒนาและอนาคตของประเทศ?

Yanawit Dechpanyawat's picture
Also available in: English

ประเทศไทยเดินหน้าแผนการพัฒนาจนกลายเป็นประเทศตัวอย่างที่มีเรื่องราวความสำเร็จที่น่าสนใจยิ่ง ไม่ว่าจะเป็นการลดจำนวนประชาการยากจนจากเกือบร้อยละ 70 ของประชากรทั้งหมดในปี 2529 จนเหลือเพียงร้อยละ 11 ในปี 2556 หรือ การเจริญเติบโตทางเศรษฐกิจของไทยที่มีอัตราก้าวหน้าเฉลี่ยที่ร้อยละ 7.5 ในช่วงปลายทศวรรษ 80 ถึงช่วงต้นทศวรรษ 90 (พ.ศ. 2523-2533) ซึ่งได้ช่วยสร้างงานให้ประชากรไทยหลายล้านคนได้หลุดพ้นจากความยากจน

อย่างไรก็ตาม ความท้าทายหลักยังคงเป็นที่ประจักษ์ เนื่องจากร้อยละ 17 ของประชากรไทย หรือ ประมาณ 7 ล้านคน ต้องอาศัยอยู่ใต้เส้นความยากจน และอีกประมาณ 7 ล้านกว่าคนที่มีความเสี่ยงสูงที่จะตกสู่สภาวะความยากจนอีกครั้ง แม้ว่าช่องว่างความไม่เท่าเทียมได้แคบลงเรื่อยๆ ในระยะเวลา 30 ปีที่ผ่านมา การกระจายความมั่งคั่งให้คนในชาติยังคงไม่ทั่วถึงเมื่อเทียบกับประเทศอื่นๆ ในภูมิภาคเอเชียตะวันออก นอกจากนี้ปัญหาความเหลื่อมล้ำทางรายได้ครัวเรือนและการบริโภคก็ยังคงมีอยู่มากทั้งในระดับประเทศและระดับภูมิภาค โดยความหนาแน่นของประชากรที่ยากจนนั้นอาศัยอยู่ในภาคอีสาน ภาคเหนือ และสามจังหวัดชายแดนภาคใต้ ปัจจุบันเศรษฐกิจไทยต้องเผชิญกับลมต้าน การเจริญเติบโตทางเศรษฐกิจในระดับไม่สูงนัก ขีดความสามารถในการส่งออกลดลง

What do Thai youth think about the future and their country’s priorities?

Yanawit Dechpanyawat's picture
Also available in: ภาษาไทย

Thailand has come a long way and represents an impressive development story: it has drastically reduced the number of poor people from nearly 70% of the population in 1986 to 11% in 2013 and its economy grew at an average annual rate of 7.5% in the late 1980s and early 1990s, creating jobs that helped pull millions of people out of poverty.

However, challenges remain as there are still 11% – 7 million – of the population living below the poverty line, and another 7 million or so who remain highly vulnerable to falling back into poverty. Although inequality has declined over the past 30 years, the distribution in Thailand remains unequal compared with many countries in East Asia. Significant and growing disparities in household income and consumption can be seen across and within regions of Thailand, with pockets of poverty remaining in the Northeast, North, and Deep South. Today, the Thai economy faces headwinds, and growth has been modest. Export competitiveness is sliding, and a severe drought is expected to weigh on off-season rice production. Poverty is expected to continue to fall at a slower rate, with poor households concentrated in rural areas affected by falling agricultural prices. The country is now at a critical time since the new draft constitution won approval by a majority.

Boon or bane: Trade agreements in Malaysia

Smita Kuriakose's picture

In the past several decades Malaysia has witnessed strong economic growth and has become one of Asia’s newly industrialized countries. In one generation it transitioned successfully from low to upper-middle-income status, due in large part to outward looking policies, trade, and foreign direct investments (FDI) — which contributed to the successful diversification of the economy. Today, Malaysia faces the challenge of escaping the middle-income trap as its productivity slows and it becomes less competitive.
 
Free trade agreements (FTAs) such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and Malaysia EU-FTA bring the potential for greater market access for Malaysia. This new generation of free trade agreements offers opportunities for Malaysia to strengthen reforms beyond tariff reduction, covering commitments such as competition and investment policies, non-tariff measures, intellectual property rights, labour standards, and opening up government procurement for competition.  With a market-friendly government and a strong track record of reforms, there are new opportunities for reinvigorating structural reforms to support private sector-led economic growth. Accelerating productivity growth is a key element of the 11th Malaysia Plan, which aims to bring Malaysia to high income status by 2020.
 

Cambodia is now a lower-middle income economy: What does this mean?

Sodeth Ly's picture
Also available in: Cambodian
Two decades of economic growth have helped make Cambodia a global leader in reducing poverty.
The success story means the Southeast Asian nation that overcame a vicious civil war now is classified as a lower-middle income economy by the World Bank Group (WBG).
 
The new classification this year is based on thresholds set by the WBG in a system with roots in a 1989 paper that outlined the methodology. The table below shows the different levels of classification based on Gross National Income (GNI): 
 
Threshold GNI in July 2016
Low-income <$1,025
Lower-middle income $1,026 - $4,035
Upper-middle income $4,036 - $12,475
High-income > $12,476
 

Empowering Myanmar’s rural poor through community-driven development

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
Poverty and isolation create a host of development challenges for Myanmar's rural communities, from poor road connections to lack of clean water and unreliable electricity.
 
Since 2013, the Myanmar National Community-Driven Development Project (NCDDP) has helped improve access to basic infrastructure and services with support from the International Development Association (IDA), the World Bank's fund for the poorest. The community-driven development (CDD) approach responds well to local development challenges, in that it lets community groups decide how to use resources based on their specific needs and priorities.
 
Implemented by Myanmar's Department of Rural Development, NCDDP now operates in 5,000 villages across 27 rural townships梙ome to over 3 million people梐nd plans to reach about 7 million people in rural communities in the coming year.
 
In this video, Ede Ijjasz and Nikolas Myint reflect on what has been achieved so far, describe some of the challenges they met along the way, and talk about plans to take the NCDDP to the next level.
 
Related:

China: how have farmers benefited from the World Bank Integrated Modern Agriculture Development Project?

Alessandra Gage's picture
Also available in: 中文
 Alessandra  Gage/FAO
Evergreen Cooperative member, Photo: Alessandra Gage/FAO
On a warm, rainy day in Shantian Village of Luo Fang Town in Jiangxi Province, farmer Liu Jian, along with five other locals, welcomed our World Bank mission team, including technical experts from the Investment Centre of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), into his home.

All six have benefited from the Integrated Modern Agriculture Development Project  (IMAD)  Project since 2014, when implementation began by the County Office for Comprehensive Agriculture Development.

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