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East Asia and Pacific

Immigrant labor: Can it help Malaysia’s economic development?

Rafael Munoz Moreno's picture


Malaysia has been able to reach remarkable achievements over the past decades, including extreme poverty eradication and promotion of inclusive growth. It aims to reach a high-income nation status by 2020, which goes beyond merely reaching a per capita GDP threshold. As the 11th Malaysia Plan points out, the goal is to achieve a growth path that is sustainable over time, reflects greater productivity, and is inclusive. High-income status can be achieved if we ensure that future generations have access to all the resources, such as education and productive opportunities, necessary to realize their ambitions and if Malaysia’s economy is globally competitive and resource-sustainable.

Over the years, immigrants have played a crucial role in the economic development of Malaysia, with around 2.1 million immigrants registered and over 1 million undocumented as of 2013. Education levels among the Malaysian population have increased remarkably over the last two decades, and immigrant workers have become one of the primary sources of labor for low-skilled occupations, most commonly in labor-intensive sectors such as construction, agriculture and manufacturing. Economic studies show that a 10% net increase in low-skilled foreign workers could raise Malaysia’s GDP by 1.1% and create employment and increase wages for most Malaysians.

Ending a 20-year water crisis in a remote village in Solomon Islands

Evan Wasuka's picture
Surrounded by water, Nanngu’s taps have been without drinking water for the past 20 years.

With the throttle at full tilt, the boat cut through the surf, spraying salt water into the air. 
Around me, the unfolding scenery is breathtaking. White sandy beaches, turquoise blue seas, swaying coconut palms – the textbook image of paradise in the South Pacific.
 
What more could one ask for in paradise?  

Water, is what they will tell you. “They” are the people of Nanngu Village on the island of Santa Cruz in the far east of Solomon Islands. 
 
Out here, water to drink, cook food with, wash and keep clean is hard to come by.
 
The last time they had proper running water was 20 years ago. That came to an end at the hands of a Category Three cyclone, Nina, which hit the islands in 1993.
 
As I write this, we’re on our way to Nanngu to see a new World Bank-supported project bringing water to the village.

Pendidikan Anak Usia Dini di pedesaan, kunci untuk menghidupkan potensi Indonesia

Rosfita Roesli's picture
Also available in: English



“Lima tahun pertama akan sangat menentukan (perkembangan) 80 tahun ke depan,” filantropis dan jutawan Bill Gates, pernah berkata, terkait pentingnya pendidikan anak usia dini (PAUD).

Pendidikan anak usia dini kerap disebut dalam Strategi Pendidikan 2020 Bank Dunia, yang memaparkan agenda 10 tahun ke depan di bidang pendidikan, dengan tujuan “Pembelajaraan untuk Semua”. Dengan moto “investasi awal, investasi yang pintar dan investasi untuk semua,” strategi ini mengatakan bahwa investasi pendidikan anak usia dini akan menopang pembangunan dan pertumbuhan sebuah negara, terutama untuk negara perkenomian berkembang seperti Indonesia.

Early childhood education in rural areas: a key to unleash Indonesia’s potential

Rosfita Roesli's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



The first five years have so much to do with how the next 80 turn out,” billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates once said, summing up the importance of early childhood education.

Early education is featured prominently in the World Bank’s Education Strategy 2020, which lays out a ten-year agenda focused on the goal of “learning for all.” With the tagline ‘Invest early, invest smartly, and invest for all,’ the strategy says that an investment in early education will support the development and growth of a nation, particularly for emerging economies such as Indonesia.

Growing together: Reducing rural poverty in Myanmar

Nikolas Win Myint's picture

The changes underway in Myanmar can be felt almost everywhere: in Nay Pyi Taw, portraits of Bogyoke Aung San grace the walls of parliament; in Yangon, traffic is choking roads while construction cranes dominate the skyline; and across the country, ports, airports and border crossings are booming with trade.  Felt almost everywhere that is, except in rural areas, where the impacts of change have been less visible. 
 

辽宁城市建设职业技术学院的“生态节能实验楼”:以学校改革引领建筑教育创新

Liping Xiao's picture
Also available in: English

生态节能建筑在中国方兴未艾,对这个新兴领域的教育培训需求不断增大。因此,辽宁城市建设职业技术学院利用世界银行贷款辽宁山东职业技术教育与培训项目的资金,在建筑教育领域,围绕校企合作,开展了课程设计、教学方法和学校管理等方面的改革,这些改革集中反映在学校的“生态实验楼”的建设上。
 

Liaoning Urban Construction School’s Eco-Laboratory: innovations in architectural education as a result of school reforms

Liping Xiao's picture
Also available in: 中文

Eco-architecture is a booming field in China, and there is a growing demand for education and training in this relatively new field. In response, the Liaoning Urban Construction School (LUCS) used funding from the World Bank-supported Liaoning and Shandong Technical and Vocational Education and Training Project to reform curriculum, teaching methods and school management in architectural education, with a focus on school-industry cooperation.  All these reforms were reflected in the construction of an “eco-laboratory”. 
 

Việt Nam có thể học hỏi được gì từ Singapore về quản lý rủi ro ngập lụt

Linh X. Le's picture
 Toàn cảnh công viên Bishan-Ang Mo Kio, Singapore. Ảnh: Stefan/Flickr

Đối với người dân Việt Nam, đất nước Singapore không chỉ là một "con rồng Châu Á" mà còn rất gần gũi nhờ mối quan hệ thân mật giữa lãnh đạo nước nhà với Cựu Thủ tướng Lý Quang Diệu, người đứng đằng sau tất cả những thành công của Singapore ngày nay. Là biểu tượng của sự hiện đại và văn minh, đặc biệt với điều kiện tài nguyên thiên nhiên hạn chế, Singapore là mô hình đáng để Việt Nam học tập trên con đường phát triển theo hướng cạnh tranh, bền vững và văn minh.
 

Strengthening Lao PDR’s financial system by making room for failure

José de Luna-Martínez's picture


 

To function properly, a financial system needs to have two doors in place: an “entry” and an “exit”. The first one enables qualified local or foreign institutions to enter the marketplace to provide innovative products and services – such as savings, investments, credits, payments and insurance – to households and firms at competitive prices. The second facilitates the rapid and orderly dissolution of those financial intermediaries that are not able to survive competition, manage risks properly, or comply with rules and regulations.

Việt Nam: Thắp sáng cuộc sống người dân nhờ lồng ghép y tế vào dự án thủy điện

Sang Minh Le's picture
Also available in: English
Việt Nam: Dự án khỏe mạnh là dự án tươi sáng

Một sớm mùa xuân năm 2016, bà Đinh Thị Son, người dân tộc Thái, đưa cháu bé 2 tháng tuổi tới công trường xây dựng của dự án thủy điện Trung Sơn để… khám bệnh. Tại sao lại đến công trường xây dưng? Bởi vì ở đó có một trung tâm y tế với đầy đủ trang thiết bị, thuốc men, xe cấp cứu, bác sĩ và điều dưỡng trực 24/7 để khám, chữa bệnh cho công nhân và người dân địa phương.

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