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Your Questions Answered: Coping with Climate Change in the Philippines

Justine Espina-Letargo's picture

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Two weeks ago we asked you to send your questions about the impacts of climate change to the Philippines’ Climate Change Commission (CCC). Thanks for forwarding us your queries and other feedback via the blog, Twitter and on Facebook. Secretary Mary Ann Lucille L. Sering of the CCC answers five questions in the video 5Questions in 5Minutes below, and will reply to the rest of them in a follow-up blog post soon. Stay tuned!

 

Filipinos, ask your questions on how to cope with the effects of climate change

Justine Espina-Letargo's picture

Secretary Lucille L. Sering of the Climate Change Commission in the Philippines will answer 5 Questions in 5 Minutes on adapting to climate change -- Post your questions in the comments section below.As a resident of Quezon City in Metro Manila, I grew up with typhoons and floods during the monsoon season that normally lasts from June to September. People in cities have learned to live with floods, and perhaps, not learned from the experience enough to change mindsets, lifestyles. Our drains continue to be clogged, motorists get stranded on the road, families still live in danger zones so much so that entire communities get evacuated, lives and livelihoods are lost, year in, year out.

Answers to more of your questions on rapidly growing cities

Dean Cira's picture

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Dean Cira

 (Urban specialist Dean Cira recently answered in a video 5 questions on rapidly growing cities that had been submitted to us by internet users. This post addresses a few additional questions).

 Manh Ha from Vietnam asked:  Urban planning currently focuses too much on having new buildings, which increases the population and construction density and reduces living environment in size. What planning model do you think Vietnam should follow?

 

There is a popular belief among planners and among Vietnamese generally that densities of the major urban centers of Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City need to be reduced to improve the quality of life.  But if we look at the density of Hanoi, we actually see that by Asian standards, it is not particularly dense.

Your questions answered: living in rapidly growing cities

Huong Lan Vu's picture

 Last week I asked you to send us your questions about the challenges faced by rapidly urbanizing countries. Please see below my video with urban specialist Dean Cira, where he addresses 5 of the many questions received. Dean will follow up soon with a blog post tackling some of your other questions and comments. Thanks!