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Community Driven Development

Menjaga pembangunan Indonesia dari semakin bertambahnya risiko bencana

Jian Vun's picture
Also available in: English
 
Permukiman baru di kabupaten Sleman pasca-letusan Gunung Merapi.

Bayangkan bila Anda tinggal dekat salah satu dari 127 gunung berapi aktif di Indonesia, dengan kekhawatiran letusan berikutnya bisa membahayakan keluarga Anda. Bayangkan rumah Anda berada di salah satu zona seismic paling aktif di dunia, atau bahwa keluarga Anda tinggal di salah satu dari 317 daerah dengan risiko banjir yang tinggi. Ini adalah kenyataan yang sudah dihadapi setidaknya 110 juta penduduk Indonesia, dan lebih banyak lagi bisa terkena dampak akibat urbanisasi, perubahan iklim, dan penurunan permukaan tanah.
 
Negara ini dikenal memiliki 'toko serba ada' bahaya bencana. Selama dua puluh tahun terakhir saja, pemerintah Indonesia mencatat lebih dari 24.000 peristiwa bencana yang menyebabkan 190.500 korban jiwa, memuat hampir 37 juta orang mengungsi, dan merusak lebih dari 4,3 juta rumah. Kerugian total dari bencana tersebut mencapai hampir $28 miliar, atau sekitar 0,3% dari PDB nasional setiap tahun.

Safeguarding Indonesia’s development from increasing disaster risks

Jian Vun's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia
 
New settlements in Sleman district post-eruption of Mt. Merapi.


Imagine that you live near one of 127 active volcanoes in Indonesia, threatened by the next eruption that could endanger your family. Imagine that your house stands in one of the most seismically-active zones in the world, or that your family lives in one of the 317 districts with high risks of flooding. This is a reality that at least 110 million Indonesians already face, and more could be affected due to the impacts of urbanization, climate change and land subsidence.

The country is known as having a ‘supermarket’ of disaster hazards. Over the past twenty years alone, the Indonesian government recorded over 24,000 disaster events that caused 190,500 fatalities, displaced almost 37 million people, and damaged over 4.3 million houses. The combined losses of these disasters totaled almost $28 billion, or around 0.3% of national GDP annually.

Speak up and be heard, Indonesia! Championing social accountability in healthcare services

Ali Winoto Subandoro's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



To get a full picture of how social accountability can improve the quality of health services in Indonesia, one only has to travel to the border areas in East Nusa Tenggara (NTT) province.  

On a scorching afternoon in August 2015 in Bijaepasu sub-district, a six hour drive from the provincial capital Kupang, a queue was forming in front of the village health center or puskesmas. The crowd seemed undeterred by the temperature that hovered around 40 degrees Celcius.

Leaning against its deteriorating walls were mothers and babies, elderly women and men. The queue was long and slow moving. The health center workers appeared overwhelmed. There were barely any medical equipment or supplies.

Maintaining momentum in Myanmar

Axel van Trotsenburg's picture

Myanmar is undergoing a historic transition. After decades of armed conflict and economic stagnation, the country is beginning to make important strides toward realizing its potential and the aspirations of its people.

Our engagement in Myanmar started more than 60 years ago when it became a member of the World Bank, soon after gaining independence from British rule.

Back in 1955, the Bank’s first economic report stated: “the lack of security remains a disrupting influence on the economic life of the country” while “the long term economic potentials are bright” on account of its moderate population growth and abundant natural resources. It also noted the importance of “encouraging private sector enterprise to improve the standard of living of the people”— these are topics that continue to resonate in today’s development discourse.

In the early 1950s, Myanmar’s GDP per-capita was comparable to that of Thailand, Korea, and Indonesia.  Like others in the region, Myanmar was coming out from colonial rule and a period of struggle. Sixty years on, Myanmar has a per capita GDP just above $1,100, less than one third the average for ASEAN countries and one of the lowest in East Asia.

The good news is that Myanmar has begun the catch up process. Major political and economic reforms since 2011 have increased civil liberties, reduced armed conflict, and removed constraints to trade and private enterprise that long held back the economy.

Video Blog: World Bank Vice President for East Asia & Pacific on his Visit to Chin State, Myanmar

Axel van Trotsenburg's picture
Video Blog: World Bank Vice President for East Asia & Pacific on his Visit to Chin State, Myanmar

Axel van Trotsenburg, World Bank Vice President for East Asia & the Pacific, visited Myanmar from May 12-16 to observe some of the initial results of the National Community Driven Development Project, the World Bank’s first project in the country in 25 years.
 

Thailand after the floods: When communities own their change

Flavia Carbonari's picture
Also available in: ภาษาไทย

In 2011, Thailand suffered the worst floods in half a century. The flood crisis impacted more than 13 million people. About 97,000 houses were damaged and entire villages and cities were under water for months.

House in Ayutthaya affected by the 2011 floods
House in Ayutthaya affected by the 2011 floods

Three years later, Thailand has been able to deal with the worst of the impacts but some of the poorest households are still struggling to recover. We visited 10 affected communities in Ayutthaya and Nakhon Sawan as part of the supervision of the Community-based Livelihood Support for Urban Poor Project (SUP). We could still see the water marks on their walls, damaged ceilings, and wobbly structures. The unrepaired houses stuck out but just as striking was the strong sense of community in the area. We were reminded that villagers came together to overcome the worst natural disaster most of them ever witnessed in their lives.

The flooding led to better disaster risk management in the neighborhoods  that are most at risk. Local governments have taken the lead. But the disaster has also, just as importantly, mobilized ordinary citizens in some of the most deprived communities. Here are some of their stories: