Syndicate content

data

Social and online media for social change: examples from Thailand

Anne Elicaño's picture
Also available in: ภาษาไทย


In Bangkok, a campaign to save land from being turned into another mega mall
brings people together online--and offline. Photo credit: Makkasan Hope

As a web editor and as a digital media enthusiast I’ve seen all sorts of content online: a close-up photo of someone’s lunch, a video of singing cats, selfies (for the blissfully uninitiated- these are self-portraits taken from mobile devices), and more.

Can such content change the world for the better? What if these were more substantial or inspiring, would it spur change more effectively? While messaging is important, I think the real power of social and online media is in its convening power.  The changing the world for the better bit happens when the communities formed by social media take things offline and act.

สื่อสังคมออนไลน์เพื่อเปลี่ยนสังคม: ตัวอย่างจากประเทศไทย

Anne Elicaño's picture
Also available in: English
การรณรงค์เพื่อสงวนมักกะสันไม่ให้เป็นห้างใหญ่ได้รวมพลังชุมชนทั้งในออนไลน์ และ ออฟไลน์ ภาพถ่ายโดย เราอยากให้มักกะสันเป็นสวนสาธารณะและพิพิธภัณฑ์

ในฐานะบรรณาธิการเว็บไซต์และผู้มีความกระตือรือร้นในเรื่องสื่อออนไลน์ ฉันเห็นเนื้อหามาทุกประเภท ตั้งแต่ภาพถ่ายใกล้ๆ ของข้าวเที่ยงของใครบางคน วีดิโอแมวร้องเพลง และภาพถ่ายตัวเองจากกล้องโทรศัพท์มือถือ และอื่นๆ

เนื้อหาเหล่านี้สามารถเปลี่ยนโลกให้ดีขึ้นได้ไหม? ถ้าหาก เนื้อหาเหล่านี้จะมีสาระและให้แรงบันดาลใจมากกว่านี้ จะทำให้มันมีประสิทธิภาพในการนำไปสู่เกิดการเปลี่ยนแปลงมากกว่านี้ไหม? ในขณะที่เนื้อหาก็เป็นสิ่งสำคัญ ฉันกลับคิดว่า พลังที่แท้จริงของสื่อสังคมออนไลน์คือ ความสามารถในการรวมพลังชุมชน นั่นคือ การเปลี่ยนโลกจะเกิดขึ้นได้จริงๆ เมื่อชุมชนที่รวมตัวกันจากสื่อสังคมนำสิ่งเหล่านั้นออกไปสู่โลกจริงๆ และลงมือทำ

Does the chance to access information carry a duty from those who ask?

Victoria Minoian's picture
Accessing information is a right that comes associated with—at least—the homework of reading, studying and understanding such information. (February 2010, World Bank booth at Library Week in Vientiane, WB photo)

World Bank opens largest set of development data --for free and in several languages

Claudia Gabarain's picture

Big news: the World Bank has launched an open data site with more than 2,000 financial, business, health, economic and human development statistics. Until now, most of this had been available only to paying subscribers.

Nam Theun 2 – How are resettled people doing?

William Rex's picture

There’s an extensive literature on dam resettlement, and according to much of this, the track record on rebuilding sustainable livelihoods is not great. For those interested, an excellent starting point is “The Future of Large Dams” by Ted Scudder. Ted has spent 50 years or so studying dams and resettlement, and has been on Nam Theun 2’s (NT2) external Panel of Experts since the early days of project preparation.

The broad reasons behind poor results in dam-related resettlement are intuitive: dams often require the resettlement of entire communities (rather than, for example, the resettlement of specific households to make way for a road), and dams may also significantly impact on existing livelihood opportunities, by, for example, flooding agricultural areas.

New Google feature lets users quickly search World Bank development data

James I Davison's picture

If you haven’t already taken the time to do some development-related Googling after last week’s announcement that World Bank statistics are now available through the ubiquitous search engine’s public data tool, I’d suggest exploring the exciting new feature. Now, anyone can easily access 17 World Development Indicators by searching for them in Google. Give it a try by searching for the GDP of China or CO2 emissions of Indonesia or exports of Thailand – or another country and any of these indicators.

When you click on the search result, an interactive chart page shows you how the data have changed over time and allows you to compare to other countries (or the world). (You can also embed the chart, like the one below.) For example, take a look at how the GDP growth rate of China compares to Indonesia, Thailand and the Philippines in the last 50 years.

To further explore the data, check out another nifty tool, also launched last week by the World Bank. DataFinder lets you research more about these development indicators and see how they look on an interactive map. Read more about DataFinder here.

The world’s resources, at a glance

James I Davison's picture

Here’s an interesting and quick item to check out on a Friday. This map gives an attractive, at-a-glace look at some of the world’s key natural resources, organized by country. A couple of things to note that are East Asia-related: China leads more categories (at least on this map) than any other country, including wheat, cotton, gold and rice.

Pages