Syndicate content

Disasters

Liability insurance for climate change

Connor Spreng's picture


Our response to climate change at the global level clearly needs improving. While some governments are managing to set and enforce limits on the emission of greenhouse gases, an international agreement that is both enforceable and meaningful remains elusive. Measures undertaken by private individuals and organizations, though plentiful, largely fail to connect to the political process and continue to fall short in aggregate. Is there a way to combine these public and private efforts? We think there is, as we’ve explored in a recent NZZ article and ETH blog post: a new type of liability insurance.

Looking to the insurance industry for addressing climate change is not new (see, for example, Nobel Laureate Robert Shiller’s column; the Geneva Association’s statement; and the climate change and insurance links discussed at the World Bank’s recent Understanding Risk conference). What has been lacking, however, are ideas for employing insurance instruments at scale, across national boundaries, and in a way that maximizes existing capacities and market mechanisms.

When, what, and how to survey after a disaster strikes – an experience from Tonga

Liana Razafindrazay's picture
Winny, an elementary teacher enumerating for the household survey (Uiha Island, Tonga, April 10, 2014). With the support from the Ministry of Education, 35 teachers from Ha'apai participated during the survey.

Back in March 2014, I had the opportunity to be part of a World Bank team supporting the Tongan government to develop a reconstruction policy after Tropical Cyclone Ian hit earlier this year. To implement the policy, the Ministry of Infrastructure led a series of surveys to inform housing reconstruction. This post, which does not intend to be scientific or exhaustive, is to share some of the key lessons I learned from this experience.

Damage assessments are routine in the aftermath of disasters, but they differ depending on their objectives (Hallegatte, 2012 - pdf). A rapid survey in the wake of a disaster event could help to estimate grossly the direct human and economic losses and damages. This type of survey is best to capture the amplitude and the severity of the disaster. However, such survey could present some flaws, often because the survey will be conducted in a very short time frame with minimal design. On the other hand, a survey conducted a few months after the event is best to understand better the context of the disaster. It also allows a better design and better preparation. But, equally, such survey could include biases. For instance, the time lag between the event and the survey itself could create some level of challenges. Most likely, people would have started to fix their houses or have moved away from the affected area, and that will add a layer of complexity to the survey.

Tonga: a national effort to reconstruct Ha’apai after Tropical Cyclone Ian

Liana Razafindrazay's picture
Woman with her baby in a shelter after Tropical Cyclone Ian hit the Ha'apai Islands (Haano Island, Tonga, April 9, 2014). The woman left Haano to deliver her baby in Lifuka Island (the capital of Ha'apai). When she got back, her house had been completely destroyed by the cyclone. She stays in a shelter with her baby and husband.

In the morning of January 11, 2014, after an early warning from the Department of Meteorology and the National Disaster Management Office on the upcoming category 5 tropical cyclone Ian, power and radio transmission went off on the Island of Ha’apai, one of the most populated among the 150 islands of the Tongan archipelago in the South Pacific.

The Pacific Islands are inherently prone to hazards due to their geographic location and small size. Each year Pacific Island countries experience damage and loss caused by natural disasters estimated at an average $284 million, or 1.7% of regional GDP (World Bank 2013). In the coming decades, climate change is expected to make things worse through sea level rise and more intense cyclones.

Thailand after the floods: When communities own their change

Flavia Carbonari's picture
Also available in: ภาษาไทย

In 2011, Thailand suffered the worst floods in half a century. The flood crisis impacted more than 13 million people. About 97,000 houses were damaged and entire villages and cities were under water for months.

House in Ayutthaya affected by the 2011 floods
House in Ayutthaya affected by the 2011 floods

Three years later, Thailand has been able to deal with the worst of the impacts but some of the poorest households are still struggling to recover. We visited 10 affected communities in Ayutthaya and Nakhon Sawan as part of the supervision of the Community-based Livelihood Support for Urban Poor Project (SUP). We could still see the water marks on their walls, damaged ceilings, and wobbly structures. The unrepaired houses stuck out but just as striking was the strong sense of community in the area. We were reminded that villagers came together to overcome the worst natural disaster most of them ever witnessed in their lives.

The flooding led to better disaster risk management in the neighborhoods  that are most at risk. Local governments have taken the lead. But the disaster has also, just as importantly, mobilized ordinary citizens in some of the most deprived communities. Here are some of their stories:

ชุมชนหลังน้ำท่วม: สร้างความเปลี่ยนแปลงด้วยลำแข้งของตัวเอง

Flavia Carbonari's picture
Also available in: English

เมื่อปี 2554 ประเทศไทยประสบภัยพิบัติน้ำท่วมที่เลวร้ายที่สุดในรอบครึ่งศตวรรษ วิกฤตนี้ส่งผลกระทบต่อประชากรกว่า 13 ล้านคน บ้านเรือนราว 97,000 หลังเสียหาย หมู่บ้านทั้งหมู่บ้านและในตัวเมืองต้องจมอยู่ในน้ำเป็นเดือนๆ

บ้านในจังหวัดอยุธยาที่ได้รับผลกระทบจากอุทกภัยปี 2554
บ้านในจังหวัดอยุธยาที่ได้รับผลกระทบจากน้ำท่วมปี 2554

สามปีต่อมา ประเทศไทยสามารถผ่านเรื่องเลวร้ายนี้ไปได้ แต่บางครัวเรือนที่ถือได้ว่ายากจนที่สุดนั้นยังคงต้องดิ้นรนที่จะฟื้นฟูตัวเอง เราเดินทางไปยังชุมชนที่ได้รับผลกระทบ 10 แห่งในอยุธยา และนครสวรรค์ ภายใต้การดำเนินงานในโครงการสนับสนุนการพัฒนาคุณภาพชีวิตคนจนเมือง (ภาษาอังกฤษ) บนกำแพงบ้านยังมีคราบน้ำให้เห็น เพดานถูกทำลาย และโครงสร้างบ้านก็โคลงเคลง เห็นได้ชัดว่า ยังมีบ้านเรือนที่ยังไม่ได้ซ่อมแซม แต่ที่เห็นได้ชัดเหมือนกัน ก็คือ พลังที่เข้มแข็งของชุมชนที่นั่น ทำให้เราตระหนักได้ว่า ชาวบ้านต่างรวมใจกันฟันฝ่าภัยพิบัติธรรมชาติอันเลวร้ายที่สุดเท่าที่พวกเขาเคยได้พบประสบเจอในชีวิต

น้ำท่วมครั้งนี้ทำให้ชาวบ้านในระแวกที่มีความเสี่ยงสูงเหล่านี้ ได้มีการบริหารจัดการความเสี่ยงจากภัยพิบัติที่ดีขึ้น ซึ่งทางเทศบาลได้ดำเนินการนำร่องไปแล้ว แต่ที่สำคัญไม่แพ้กัน คือ ภัยพิบัตินี้ยังได้ระดมพลังพลเมืองธรรมดาๆ ในชุมชนที่มีความยากไร้สูงนี้ด้วย นี่คือเรื่องราวบางส่วนของพวกเขา

OpenStreetMap volunteers map Typhoon Haiyan-affected areas to support Philippines relief and recovery efforts

Zuzana Stanton-Geddes's picture


Mapping impact on houses in Tacloban

In the aftermath of a disaster, lack of information about the affected areas can hamper relief and recovery efforts. Open-source mapping tools provide a much-needed low-cost high-tech opportunity to bridge this gap and provide localized information that can be freely used and further developed.

A week ago, devastating typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines. As the images of the horrifying destruction emerge, there is a clear need in accessing localized high-resolution information that can guide communities’ recovery and reconstruction. Responding to this challenge, over 766 volunteers have been activated by the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) to create baseline geographic data which can be freely used by the Philippine government, donors and partner organizations to support all phases of disaster recovery.

The Pacific Islands Forum Responds to Climate Change

Axel van Trotsenburg's picture


I am here this week in Majuro in the Marshall Islands – where leaders from the Pacific Island Forum have gathered to discuss the impacts of climate change and to push for global action to mitigate the effects.

Here in the Marshall Islands, the highest point above sea level is only 3 meters.

In May this year, an unprecedented drought in the northern atolls of the Marshall Islands left many without enough food and water.

กรุงเทพฯ หลังน้ำท่วม 2554: คนยากจนเป็นอย่างไรบ้าง?

Zuzana Stanton-Geddes's picture

Also available in English

หน้าฝนมาเยือนเมืองไทยอีกแล้ว มาพร้อมกับความทรงจำถึงน้ำท่วมครั้งใหญ่ในปี 2554 ที่ส่งผลกระทบต่อผู้คนกว่า 13 ล้านคน มีผู้เสียชีวิต 680 ราย และสร้างความเสียหาย 46.5 พันล้านเหรียญสหรัฐฯ  ผลกระทบของน้ำท่วมที่มีต่อธุรกิจและห่วงโซ่อุปทานของโลกที่มีการบันทึกไว้เป็นอย่างละเอียด และเป็นข่าวพาดหัวตลอดทั้งปี 2555  แต่ว่าคนยากคนจนล่ะเป็นอย่างไรบ้าง?

น้ำท่วมคราวนั้นเปลี่ยนแปลงชีวิตชายและหญิงหลายแสนคน โดยเฉพาะผู้ที่อยู่ในสภาพง่อนแง่นไม่มั่นคงอยู่แล้ว  สองปีผ่านไปเกิดความเปลี่ยนแปลงอะไรขึ้นบ้าง?

จากการที่ได้ไปเยือนโครงการพัฒนายกระดับชุมชนแออัดสองแห่งในกรุงเทพฯ ตอนเหนือเมื่อเดือนก่อน ก็ได้พบเห็นเรื่องราวที่เป็นประเด็นสำหรับเมืองอื่นๆ ในเอเชียที่กำลังเผชิญกับการเพิ่มขึ้นของจำนวนประชากรอย่างรวดเร็ว พลังอำนาจของภัยธรรมชาติ และความแปรปรวนของสภาพภูมิอากาศ

Your Questions Answered: Coping with Climate Change in the Philippines

Justine Espina-Letargo's picture

Video Platform Video Management Video Solutions Video Player

Two weeks ago we asked you to send your questions about the impacts of climate change to the Philippines’ Climate Change Commission (CCC). Thanks for forwarding us your queries and other feedback via the blog, Twitter and on Facebook. Secretary Mary Ann Lucille L. Sering of the CCC answers five questions in the video 5Questions in 5Minutes below, and will reply to the rest of them in a follow-up blog post soon. Stay tuned!

 

Pages