Syndicate content

Land

Transit-Oriented Development with Chinese Characteristics: localization as the rule rather than the exception

Jasmine Susanna Tillu's picture
Also available in: 中文
China: More Mobility with Fewer Cars through a GEF Grant

Since our days in school, we have often been told to first define our terms before doing anything else. China is a country that does not shy away from acronyms, and “TOD,” or transit-oriented development—a concept that merges land use and transport planning—is one such acronym that has become wildly popular within the field of urban development.
 
So, recently, when government officials from seven Chinese cities and the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development gathered to launch the China Sustainable Cities Integrated Approach Pilot Project on the topic of TOD, it was clear that they all had the same definition of this three-letter acronym.
 
Or did they?
 

中国特色的公共交通导向开发(TOD):因地制宜是通则,而非特例

Jasmine Susanna Tillu's picture
Also available in: English
China: More Mobility with Fewer Cars through a GEF Grant

从上学起,我们就常被教导做事要从定义概念开始。中国是不惮使用缩略语的国家,TOD或公共交通导向开发,这个有机结合土地使用和交通规划的概念,已广为流行于中国城市开发领域。
 
最近,中国七个城市与住房和城乡建设部(住建部)的官员共同启动有关TOD的 中国可持续城市综合方式试点项目。很明显,大家对这个三个字母的缩略语有一致定义。
 
但是真的一致吗?
 

Land at the heart of Myanmar’s transition: Part 2

Anna Wellenstein's picture

Also available in Myanmar (.pdf)

 

Mike-Petteri Torhonen / World Bank



In our previous post, we discussed some of the major land-related challenges facing Myanmar’s transition and development. In fact, resolving outstanding land issues will help the country achieve social cohesion and stability, poverty reduction, sustainable urbanization, as well as economic growth.
 
The government has already started taking measures to institute strong and effective land administration.

Land at the heart of Myanmar’s transition: Part 1

Anna Wellenstein's picture

Also available in: Myanmar (.pdf)


 

Mike-Petteri Torhonen / World Bank




Struggles over land in Myanmar have been a defining characteristic of the country’s six decades of armed conflict.
 
In the past, government acquired lands for extracting natural resources, commercialized farming, and ambitious infrastructure projects, such as building of the new capital city of Nay Pyi Taw. Today, claims over land acquisition injustices dominate public discourse and the new government’s agenda. In parallel, infrastructure and institutions for land administration and property markets are grossly outdated and weak.

Satu Peta: mempercepat administrasi pertanahan terpadu untuk Indonesia

Anna Wellenstein's picture
Also available in: English
Foto: Curt Carnemark / World Bank

Hutan-hutan primer telah lama hilang dari lingkungan desa Teluk Bakung di pinggiran Pontianak, ibukota Kalimantan Barat di Indonesia. Hal ini tampak ketika saya tiba di wilayah tersebut pada akhir November 2016, sebagai bagian dari kunjungan lapangan. Kami melihat bagaimana sebagian besar penduduk desa telah meninggalkan pertanian yang berat di lahan gambut untuk bekerja pada perkebunan-perkebunan besar kelapa sawit dan ladang kelapa sawit mereka sendiri. Yang lain memilih berinvestasi dalam produksi sarang burung yang menguntungkan. Namun mereka melakukannya di tengah-tengah tata kelola penggunaan lahan yang membingungkan: demarkasi batas wilayah kawasan hutan dan wilayah administratif tidak lengkap, sementara kelompok kepentingan masyarakat dan pihak berwenang memperdebatkan sejarah alokasi areal konsesi perkebunan. Kumpulan data publik menunjukkan keragaman penggunaan lahan dan hutan di wilayah tersebut, termasuk cagar alamnya. Namun dalam kenyataannya, hampir seluruh lahan yang ada semakin dikhususkan untuk produksi kelapa sawit. 

One Map: accelerating unified land administration for Indonesia

Anna Wellenstein's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia
Photo: Curt Carnemark / World Bank


The primary forests have long gone from the surroundings of Teluk Bakung village on the outskirts of Pontianak, the capital of Indonesia’s West Kalimantan province. This was evident when I arrived in the region in late November 2016, as part of a field visit. We saw how most villagers have abandoned the difficult peatlands agriculture to work on large oil palm plantations and their own oil palm fields. Others have opted to invest in lucrative edible bird nest production. But they do so against a backdrop of confusing land-use management: forest estate and administrative boundary demarcation is incomplete, and community interest groups and authorities debate over the historical allocation of plantation concessions. Public data sets show a wide variety of land and forest uses in the area, including reserves. But in reality, virtually all of the land is increasingly being devoted to oil palm production.