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Sustainable Communities

Gender mainstreaming in resettlement processes: Have we done enough?

Nghi Quy Nguyen's picture
A Thai woman in a consultation meeting in Trung Son
Hydropower Project. Photo: Mai Bo / World Bank

Last August, I visited Quang Ngai, a central coastal province in Vietnam, to collect data for a survey on women’s participation in resettlement activities. I expected our first meeting with the local community to be short and uncontroversial. It wasn’t.

“We, women? Our participation? It doesn’t matter. We all stay at home. We don’t care about you coming here and asking about our participation,” said one female participant. “What we do care is to know the extent to which the recommendations we make today will be addressed. We need a resettlement site with community house, trees and kindergarten as promised during the project preparation.” 

That comment brought to light an important perspective, highlighting the tension between what we might expect women to want, and their actual needs.

The impacts of development-induced resettlement disproportionately affect women, as they are faced with more difficulties than men to cope with disruption to their families. And this is particularly the case if there is no mechanism to enable meaningful participation and consultation with women throughout the project cycle in general and in the resettlement process in particular.

LGBTI ในประเทศไทย: ข้อมูลใหม่แสดงเส้นทางสู่การเป็นหนึ่งเดียว กับสังคมยิ่งกว่าที่เคย

Ulrich Zachau's picture
Also available in: English

พรุ่งนี้เป็นวันสากลยุติความเกลียดกลัวคนรักเพศเดียวกัน คนข้ามเพศ และคนรักสองเพศ แนวคิดหลักของงานในวันสำคัญปีนี้คือ ครอบครัว ครอบครัวเป็นสิ่งสำคัญสำหรับชีวิตพวกเราทุกคน เป็นสิ่งที่เราใส่ใจเป็นลำดับแรก และเป็นสิ่งสำคัญกว่าสิ่งอื่นใด  

LGBTI in Thailand: New data paves way for more inclusion

Ulrich Zachau's picture
Also available in: ภาษาไทย

Tomorrow is the International Day against Homophobia, Transphobia, and Biphobia. This year, the global theme for this important day is family. Family is vital for all of us, it is what we care about first and foremost.  

Innovation festival provides fresh ideas on how to use vital funds in Indonesian villages

Hera Diani's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



One recent scorching afternoon, a display of colorful squat toilets welcomed curious visitors in the main park of the city of Mataram, in Indonesia’s West Nusa Tenggara province.
 
These visitors were not looking to buy new toilet bowls, nor were they working on home improvement projects. They were among 350 villagers who went ‘shopping’ for ideas and innovations to improve basic services and infrastructure in their home villages.
 
The 2017 Village Innovation Festival was organized by the provincial government of West Nusa Tenggara, in collaboration with the Ministry of Village's Generasi Cerdas dan Sehat Program.The festival highlighted innovative solutions to address some of the most pressing development challenges faced by village communities.

中国“长寿之乡”丽水:致力构建气候适应型城市

Barjor Mehta's picture
Also available in: English
图片:吴皛

过去三十年来,中国速度空前的城镇化使得2.6亿农民工从农业转移到其它生产领域,也帮助5亿人摆脱了贫困,推动中国经济连续三十年以年均10%的速度增长。与此同时,2000年至2014年间,天气相关灾害造成了4.645万亿元(约合7490亿美元)的经济损失。

强有力证据显示,气候变化正在改变灾害格局。据观察,特大暴雨的频率和严重程度自上世纪五十年代以来大幅上升;而未来气候情景模拟显示,降雨的年际变化可能会进一步增大,从而加剧洪灾风险和缺水严重程度。

过去二十年间,中国浙江省丽水市遭受洪水灾害、山体滑坡以及高温酷热之苦。如今, 200多万丽水人有很多自豪之处。丽水被认定为中国最著名的风景如画的生态之城、养生天堂和长寿之乡,这得益于丽水市和浙江省政府官员高度重视,首先弄清气候变化带来的问题的根源,随后全面规划、设计和实施了技术上完善的项目。这些项目与穿城而过的河流和谐相依,与周边丘陵地带贯穿全市的天然暴雨排水系统浑然一体。

In Lishui, China’s “home of longevity”: working towards resilience and adaptation to climate change

Barjor Mehta's picture
Also available in: 中文
Photo:Xiao Wu

Over the past three decades, China’s unprecedented pace of urbanization has allowed more than 260 million migrants to move from agriculture to more productive activities. This has helped 500 million people escape poverty and for China to grow at an average 10 percent a year for three consecutive decades. At the same time, between 2000 and 2014, weather-related disasters caused more than RMB 4.645 trillion ($749 billion) in damages.

There is strong evidence that climate change is altering the profile of hazards. The observed frequency and severity of extremely heavy rain storms since the 1950s in China have significantly increased and future climate scenarios suggest that interannual variability in rainfall may increase further, aggravating the risk of flooding and as well as severe lack of water.

Over the past two decades, the city of Lishui in Zhejiang Province of China suffered from devastating floods, landslides, as well as heat waves. Today, the over 2 million people of Lishui have a lot to be proud of. Their city is recognized as China’s “top ecological, picturesque paradise for healthy life and home of longevity”. This is the result of close attention from city and provincial officials in understanding the root causes of the problems caused by the changing climate. This has been followed by inclusive planning, design and implementation of technically sound projects that are in harmony with the rivers flowing through the city in concert with the surrounding hilly terrain’s natural and city-wide storm water drainage systems.

Project Safety 101 for Kids in Tuvalu

Nora Weisskopf's picture



When I was in primary school, there was a large construction project happening on the road in front of our house. I remember it was loud, dusty and the subject of constant complaints from our neighbors. However, my most vivid memory is of all the shiny, majestic machinery being delivered by the workers in their bright orange uniforms.

There was an immediate fascination among the children with these powerful and temptingly dangerous machines. Of course our parents all drilled us with the same message – “Do not go near, do not touch, do not interfere with the nice men repairing the roads,” and so we abided, but the curiosity and thrill of potentially touching these metal monsters never entirely subsided. Luckily, working in the transport sector now I get to be around construction equipment all the time!

中国经济改革与外国专家的作用

Abhas Jha's picture
Also available in: English
1985年9 月举行的“巴山轮会议”与会代表合影
图片:©世界银行

我是个研究政策的书呆子,整个职业生涯(先在印度政府任职,后来到世界银行工作)都在密切关注政策选择是如何做出的,政治进程是如何演进的,机构和个人如何从各自的动机出发,为赞成或反对某种变革而结盟。我在中国工作了将近8年,和我的许多前辈一样,我深深爱上了这个美丽的国家及其人民,爱上了它博大深厚的文明,同时也不断地惊异于中国的变化速度之快、规模和能量之大,这种巨变使8亿多中国人摆脱了贫困。
 
我刚刚读完一部名为《不可能的合作伙伴:中国改革者、西方经济学家和使中国走向全球》(Unlikely Partners: Chinese Reformers, Western Economists and the Making of Global China)的著作,在某种意义上,这本书将我专业工作的两部分合二而一。

China, economic reform and the role of foreign experts

Abhas Jha's picture
Also available in: 中文
Group photos of the participants of the 1985 Bashan river cruise conference
Photo: copyright © / World Bank

I am a policy wonk. I have spent my entire professional career (first in the Government of India and then in the World Bank) watching up close how policy choices are made, how political processes play out and on how institutions and people form coalitions for or against any change based on their incentives. I have also worked in China for close to 8 years, and like so many before me, have fallen in love with the beautiful country, its people and civilizational depth and continue to be amazed at the sheer pace, scale and energy of the massive changes the country has undergone, lifting more than 800 million of its citizens out of poverty.
 
I just finished reading a majestic book entitled “Unlikely Partners: Chinese Reformers, Western Economists and the Making of Global China” that, in a sense, brings the two parts of my professional work together.

Listening to women while planning for development: Real life experience from China

Aimin Hao's picture
Also available in: 中文
“Women hold up half of the sky,” Chairman Mao said. So when it comes to development, it is important to listen to women – who generally make up half of our beneficiaries – and understand their views, preferences and needs. As we celebrate International Women’s Day this week, I’m sharing some of my experience helping to increase gender awareness in World Bank-supported projects in China.

When we designed activities for the Ningbo Sustainable Urbanization Project, we carried out consultations with groups of men and women to make sure the proposed public transport system benefitted both equally. It was interesting to find that most men wanted wider roads with higher speed, while women cared more about the location of bus stops and adequate lighting on the bus.. Thanks to these consultations, we adjusted the locations of bus stops to be closer to the entrance of residential communities and reduce walking distance for bus riders. In response to the light request, we made sure that new buses purchased for the project had sufficient lighting for night use.
Conducting consultation with local women in Qianhuang village, Ningo, China.

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