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tsunami

What does a world champion boxer have to do with saving lives in a disaster?

Yann Kerblat's picture
For Project NOAH, flood hazard maps are more “punchy” and effective when they are accessible and easy to read. Shown above is a flood map of the city of Manila during typhoon Ondoy (international name: Ketsana) in 2009.

World Champion boxer Manny Pacquiao is a living icon in the Philippines, his legendary battles are well known and brought him considerable fame. This fame and recognition is being used by the Philippine government (through Project NOAH) to save lives and minimize losses from disasters—where an infographic gradient links flood depth to Pacquiao’s famous height. In other words, to encourage adoption of early warning advisories and make flood hazard projections more interesting, yellow colors on interactive flood hazard maps equate to flood levels up to Pacquiao’s knees, while a dangerous, bright red color corresponds to high flood levels that are taller than Pacquiao himself.

Tiga pelajaran penting dari Tsunami 2004

Abhas Jha's picture
Also available in: English



Pada dasarnya saya adalah orang yang pragmatis, mengingat awal karir saya sebagai petugas kelurahan, lanjut terus ke kecamatan, di India, ketika saya bertanggungjawab untuk banyak hal yang terjadi di lapangan, mulai dari persediaan air hingga rencana penggunaan lahan pertanian. Namun saya sangat sedih dan terpukul menyaksikan dampak dari bencana tsunami 2004. Di Indonesia saja, sekitar 220.000 orang kehilangan nyawa.

Three key lessons from the 2004 Tsunami

Abhas Jha's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



I began my professional career as a sub-district and district level administrator in India-a position that makes one responsible for pretty much everything- from making sure the water comes out of the taps and the garbage is collected in the morning to helping pull accident victims out from horrific accidents and facing down stone-pelting mobs. This early experience of being thrown into the deep end of the pool gives me a somewhat pragmatic sense of perspective and equanimity. But I still recall the horror and overwhelming grief that I felt when the full impact of the 2004 Tsunami started becoming clear. In Indonesia alone approximately 220,000 people lost their lives.

Kapal tsunami: Wisata unik di Aceh

David Lawrence's picture

Available in English

Apa yang Anda lakukan kalau ada kapal seberat 2.600 ton mendarat di dekat rumah? Percaya atau tidak, ada beberapa orang yang bingung menjawab pertanyaan ini.

Tsunami yang menyapu Lautan Hindia pada 26 Desember 2004 tidak hanya membawa kerusakan dan korban jiwa. Kejadian tersebut juga menyapu PLTD Apung 1, kapal pembangkit listrik yang bersandar di Pelabuhan Ulee Lheue Banda Aceh, naik ke darat. Seharusnya kapal ini menghasilkan listrik untuk beberapa dekade lagi untuk mengurangi keterbatasan listrik di Indonesia.

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Tetapi kapal tersebut terangkat oleh tsunami hingga beberapa kilometer ke darat, tepat di tengah-tengah perumahan. Ketika saya pertama kali tiba di Banda Aceh pada tahun 2006, penduduk masih tinggal di beberapa rumah tepat di samping kapal itu. Sebuah jalan sementara dibuat mengelilingi benda besar tersebut. Di dekatnya ada kotak yang diletakkan di atas sebuah kursi, dengan tulisan tangan untuk meminta sumbangan bagi para korban tsunami. Pertanyaan yang ada di benak kami semua adalah: Apa yang akan mereka lakukan dengan sumbangan itu?

The tsunami ship: Offbeat tourism in Aceh, Indonesia

David Lawrence's picture
What do you do when a 2,600 ton ship ends up in your neighborhood? Believe it or not, there are people who’ve had to struggle with this question.

 

The tsunami that swept across the Indian Ocean on December 26, 2004, didn’t only leave behind wreckage and corpses. It also left behind the PLTD Apung 1, a power-generating barge that was docked in Banda Aceh’s Ulee Lheue port when the disaster struck.  It might have pumped out electricity for a few more decades, easing electricity shortages throughout Indonesia, before heading to the scrap heap.

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Instead, it was lifted by the tsunami and deposited several kilometers inland, smack in the middle of a residential neighborhood. When I first arrived in Banda Aceh in 2006, people were living in houses right next to it. A makeshift road worked its way around the massive obstacle. A box sat on a chair nearby, with a hand-written sign asking for donations for tsunami victims. The question we all had was: What on earth are they going to do with it?

Samoa after the disaster: The wave of fire and the kid called Tsunami

Aleta Moriarty's picture

In June 2009 Samoa was the set for the popular TV program Survivor. It was a fantastic choice. It is one of those picture-perfect places–shady palms, trees dripping with fruit, blossoming hibiscus, all framed by powder sand beaches. It is a vastly understated paradise.

A few months later, the country was once again centre stage. This time for something utterly distressing and heart-breaking as the country embarked on the harrowing search for real life survivors after they were struck by a powerful tsunami on 29 September 2009.

Galu afi means “wave of fire” and is the traditional Samoan word used to describe a tsunami. It describes the force that gains momentum as the wave generates and the sheer destruction that it brings to bear. That is what happened here.

Rebuilding paradise – Samoa's recovery from the 2009 tsunami

Tobias Haque's picture

On the surface, the pace of life in the Pacific island country of Samoa is slow. Island time. That’s an impression that’s reinforced when touring the idyllic string of resorts and beach fales (small timber and thatch tourist cottages, often without walls and open to the tropical breeze) along the South East coast of Upolu, Samoa. You can watch the heat rise in a haze across the ridiculously tranquil blue waters and golden sands, as coconut palms wave, and tourists enjoy a weekend drink in the seafront restaurant of the locally-owned and recently rebuilt Tafua beach fales.

Five years after the tsunami: recollections from my work on ground zero in Aceh, Indonesia

Geumala Yatim's picture
Explaining the housing program admistered by the Multi-Donor Fund to a group of residents.

(Geumala Yatim, who started working with communities in Aceh soon after the 2004 tsunami hit, is writing a book about her experiences there. This is adapted from one of its chapters).

At the time, I was at my friend Oscar’s house, getting ready to attend a Christmas party at another friend’s house. Oscar asked me to turn the TV on to CNN or BBC. “I heard there’s a big natural disaster somewhere on the tip of Sumatra. Aceh probably. Not sure,” he said. Up until we left the house, both channels were relaying non-stop reports on natural disasters in Thailand and Sri Lanka. No reports on what was happening on the tip of Sumatra thus far.

Indonesia: Bio-gas project keeps pig farm waste from going to waste

Nia Sarinastiti's picture

Pig farmers in Nias pull a 'waste disappearing act' by converting manure into useable energy.
At one of my trips to Nias, Indonesia, I discovered that a pig pen can actually be so clean without any spot of dirt or waste. It was something I have never imagined after seeing pig farms that have mud (of all kinds all) all over the place. You can imagine what it would look like, right?

The clean pig pen I saw was in the village of Tetehosi, Idanagawo sub-district owned by a farm group with the name Ternak Harapan Maju which means, “Farm Hopes to Progress.” The pen is managed by priest Sabar Markus Lase, not only because he knows about pig farming, but also because the pig pen is in the backyard of the church.

An up-close look at rebuilding after disaster

James I Davison's picture

For most of us, when a disaster happens in a far away place, we only get brief glimpses of the immediate aftermath and subsequent recovery efforts – often only through news media or occasionally close-by bloggers. During four years of reconstruction after the devastating tsunami that hit the Indonesian province of Aceh in 2004, few have seen the rebuilding process like those who are part of the recovery efforts.

The Multi-Donor Fund (MDF), which is managed by the World Bank with contributions and guidance from 15 other international donor partners, continues to work on the ground in Aceh and Nias. The reconstruction has been extremely successful, with more than 100,000 new houses constructed, more than 90,000 hectares of agricultural land restored and 2,500 kilometers of road built. In late 2008, the MDF held a photo competition for people involved with projects or agencies related to reconstruction. The resulting pictures are not professionally created, but they give a beautifully close and comprehensive view of the rebuilding of Aceh.


(Hover your mouse over "Notes" to see information about each photo)

Many of the pictures were featured in the Multi-Donor Fund 2008 Progress Report, which can be found at the MDF website. You can also see the photos at our Flickr page.

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