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waste management

Nothing left to waste in the Philippines

Maya Villaluz's picture


The waste sector spans from collection, sorting, separation, recycling, handling of residuals and safe, final disposal. The elements of an efficient and effective waste management system are multifaceted and its operations are complex. While many perceive the entire process as a ‘dirty’ business, it requires a high level of professionalism and sophistication to run a well-organized waste management scheme. It is not a surprise that a strong informal sector has evolved to cater to the unmet waste disposal needs of communities, industries and other waste generators.

It is estimated that over a hundred thousand people in the Philippines work in the informal waste sector. Many of these belong to vulnerable, marginalized groups - waste pickers in open dumpsites and other dumping grounds and wandering trash collectors, haulers and buyers on-foot or using wooden carts and bicycles.

Bank Sampah di Indonesia: Menabung, Mengubah Perilaku

Randy Salim's picture
Also available in: English



Bicara soal sampah: kecenderungannya adalah kita tidak terlalu memikirkan apakah sampah yang kita hasilkan itu organik atau non-organik. Kita mungkin juga tidak terlalu peduli ke mana larinya sampah itu. Sementara kenyataannya: di Indonesia, sampah rumahtangga kita akan bercampur dengan sampah jutaan rumahtangga lainnya, hingga terbentuklah gunung-gunung sampah yang tak semestinya di tempat pembuangan akhir (TPA) berbagai kota.  
 
Bicara soal pengelolaan sampah yang ideal, para pakar akan mengatakan bahwa tanggungjawabnya bukanlah milik pemerintah kota semata, tetapi milik bersama.
Jumlah penduduk terus meningkat, begitu pula pola konsumsi. Volume sampah pun kian meluap di berbagai TPA.
 
Lantas apa yang bisa dilakukan? Saat ini di Indonesia, Bank Dunia tengah mengkaji berbagai cara untuk memperbaiki sistem pengelolaan sampah. Salah satu pilihannya adalah memperbanyak jumlah bank sampah.  Belum lama ini saya bersama tim proyek pengelolaan sampah Bank Dunia  mengunjungi bank sampah di beberapa kota untuk belajar lebih banyak tentang cara kerjanya.
 

Waste Not, Want Not : “Waste Banks” in Indonesia

Randy Salim's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



When you’ve grown so used to tossing all manner of garbage into the trash bin, without giving a second thought to whether it is organic or non-organic waste, it’s easy to not care where your garbage ultimately ends up. But the reality is that, in Indonesia, your garbage gets mixed together with the garbage of millions of households, creating mountains of toxic waste too large to contain in municipal landfills.
 
As experts in the field would vehemently argue, solid waste management is not the sole responsibility of a municipal government, but a collective one. As populations grow and consumption patterns increase, more and more solid waste is created– and landfills can only take so much waste!
 
So what to do? The World Bank in Indonesia is currently exploring how to improve solid waste management, and scaling up ‘waste banks’ is one option.  Recently I went on mission with the Solid Waste team to see these waste banks at work.