Syndicate content

Youth

Transformasi struktural Indonesia beri petunjuk di mana lapangan kerja yang bagus

Maria Monica Wihardja's picture
Also available in: English



Pepatah mengatakan “Hidup bagaikan roda – kadang di atas, kadang di bawah”.

Era ‘booming komoditas’ ketika harga minyak mentah, kelapa sawit dan batu bara melambung tinggi sudah berakhir. Sudah seyogyanya hal ini ini menjadi lampu kuning bagi Indonesia, karena peralihan ekonomi ini telah mempengaruhi pertumbuhan lapangan kerja dalam beberapa tahun terakhir. Lalu, bagaimana Indonesia bisa terus menciptakan lapangan kerja baru untuk pencari tenaga kerjanya yang terus bertambah?

Jawabannya ada di sektor manufaktur dan jasa, seperti yang sudah terindikasi oleh pola sejarah yang ada.

Dalam waktu 20 tahun terakhir (di luar era krisis ekonomi di tahun 1997-1999), sektor manufaktur dan jasa menjadi sumber penting lapangan kerja baru di tengah menurunnya jumlah pekerjaan di sektor pertanian. Dari tahun 1999-2015, proporsi pekerjaan di bidang pertanian turun menjadi 34% dari 56%, dari total lapangan kerja, sedangkan sektor jasa mengalami kenaikan menjadi 54% dari 34% dan sektor manufaktur naik dari 10% menjadi 13%. 

Indonesia’s structural transformation offers clues on where to find good jobs

Maria Monica Wihardja's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



What goes up must come down.

The end of the commodities boom is a wake-up call for Indonesia, as the reversal in economic transformation has adversely impacted employment growth in recent years. How can Indonesia continue to create jobs for its growing labor force?

Jobs in manufacturing and services offer a solution, as historical patterns of job creation have shown.

In the past 20 years (excluding the economic crisis of 1997-1999), manufacturing and services have been important sources of job creation, while employment in agriculture continues to decline. From 1990 to 2015, jobs in agriculture fell to 34% from 56% of all employment, while service sector work has surged to 53% from 34%, and manufacturing jobs have increased from 10% to 13%.

เยาวชนไทยคิดอย่างไรกับการพัฒนาและอนาคตของประเทศ?

Yanawit Dechpanyawat's picture
Also available in: English

ประเทศไทยเดินหน้าแผนการพัฒนาจนกลายเป็นประเทศตัวอย่างที่มีเรื่องราวความสำเร็จที่น่าสนใจยิ่ง ไม่ว่าจะเป็นการลดจำนวนประชาการยากจนจากเกือบร้อยละ 70 ของประชากรทั้งหมดในปี 2529 จนเหลือเพียงร้อยละ 11 ในปี 2556 หรือ การเจริญเติบโตทางเศรษฐกิจของไทยที่มีอัตราก้าวหน้าเฉลี่ยที่ร้อยละ 7.5 ในช่วงปลายทศวรรษ 80 ถึงช่วงต้นทศวรรษ 90 (พ.ศ. 2523-2533) ซึ่งได้ช่วยสร้างงานให้ประชากรไทยหลายล้านคนได้หลุดพ้นจากความยากจน

อย่างไรก็ตาม ความท้าทายหลักยังคงเป็นที่ประจักษ์ เนื่องจากร้อยละ 17 ของประชากรไทย หรือ ประมาณ 7 ล้านคน ต้องอาศัยอยู่ใต้เส้นความยากจน และอีกประมาณ 7 ล้านกว่าคนที่มีความเสี่ยงสูงที่จะตกสู่สภาวะความยากจนอีกครั้ง แม้ว่าช่องว่างความไม่เท่าเทียมได้แคบลงเรื่อยๆ ในระยะเวลา 30 ปีที่ผ่านมา การกระจายความมั่งคั่งให้คนในชาติยังคงไม่ทั่วถึงเมื่อเทียบกับประเทศอื่นๆ ในภูมิภาคเอเชียตะวันออก นอกจากนี้ปัญหาความเหลื่อมล้ำทางรายได้ครัวเรือนและการบริโภคก็ยังคงมีอยู่มากทั้งในระดับประเทศและระดับภูมิภาค โดยความหนาแน่นของประชากรที่ยากจนนั้นอาศัยอยู่ในภาคอีสาน ภาคเหนือ และสามจังหวัดชายแดนภาคใต้ ปัจจุบันเศรษฐกิจไทยต้องเผชิญกับลมต้าน การเจริญเติบโตทางเศรษฐกิจในระดับไม่สูงนัก ขีดความสามารถในการส่งออกลดลง

What do Thai youth think about the future and their country’s priorities?

Yanawit Dechpanyawat's picture
Also available in: ภาษาไทย

Thailand has come a long way and represents an impressive development story: it has drastically reduced the number of poor people from nearly 70% of the population in 1986 to 11% in 2013 and its economy grew at an average annual rate of 7.5% in the late 1980s and early 1990s, creating jobs that helped pull millions of people out of poverty.

However, challenges remain as there are still 11% – 7 million – of the population living below the poverty line, and another 7 million or so who remain highly vulnerable to falling back into poverty. Although inequality has declined over the past 30 years, the distribution in Thailand remains unequal compared with many countries in East Asia. Significant and growing disparities in household income and consumption can be seen across and within regions of Thailand, with pockets of poverty remaining in the Northeast, North, and Deep South. Today, the Thai economy faces headwinds, and growth has been modest. Export competitiveness is sliding, and a severe drought is expected to weigh on off-season rice production. Poverty is expected to continue to fall at a slower rate, with poor households concentrated in rural areas affected by falling agricultural prices. The country is now at a critical time since the new draft constitution won approval by a majority.

‘I matter’: giving unemployed young Papua New Guineans a second chance

Tom Perry's picture

Young people account for almost half of Papua New Guinea’s population and comprise a large part of the urban poor. In the capital, Port Moresby, an increasing number of young people are leaving school without the necessary skills for entry-level jobs.

The Urban Youth Employment Project (UYEP) provides disadvantaged young people (aged between 16 and 35) in Port Moresby with life skills and employment training to increase their chances of finding long-term employment, also the motivation to make a fresh start in life. To help meet immediate economic needs, the project is also providing temporary employment opportunities.

Realizing the hopes of unemployed youth in Papua New Guinea

Walai Punena Jacklyn Tongia's picture



I met Gilford Jirigani at a workshop in Port Moresby a few months ago. What struck me about him was his natural confidence and poise as he captured the audience’s attention - including mine-as he told us how one project changed his life. He went from being an unemployed kid, down and out and unclear about his life in the city, to eventually becoming one of the pioneers of a youth program aimed at increasing the employability of unemployed youth in Port Moresby in 2012.

Vietnam: Who are the corruption game changers?

Huong Thi Lan Tran's picture
Also available in: Tiếng Việt
Two members of the Black and White club join an arm-wrestling competition with the slogan 'Arm-wrestling to blow away corruption' at a youth event in Hanoi in November 2012 to promote fair education environment.

I often hear that corruption is everywhere and nothing can be done about it. I used to believe it. I still hear people saying the work on anticorruption is a waste of time. I disregard these cynical statements now.  Who made me change my attitude? The youth.

I started being inspired several years ago when a group of young women from the Vietnamese NGO Live and Learn (L&L) developed the idea of ‘a sustainable and transparent society in the hands of youth’. As clear as the idea tells, these young women wanted to engage more with youth, educate them about sustainable and transparent development and how young people can become catalysts for change and for a less corruption-prone country. The idea was among winning initiatives of the Vietnam Innovation Day (VID) 2009 More Transparency and Accountability, Less Corruption, which was co-organized by the World Bank and the Government Inspectorate.[1]

As part of the project idea, L&L would help connect and create a network of student and youth groups (Green Generation network, volunteer clubs, youth organizations, Be Change Agents, etc.) in Hanoi. These groups would be more informed of development issues such as sustainable development, corruption, and their responsibilities, and eventually would act together to build a corruption-free society. The journey was not without difficulties. During the first six months of the project, L&L was not able to get into many universities to talk with students about transparency nor integrity, let alone corruption. Even if universities were open to the idea, not many students showed interest. Some events attracted only 8 young people.

Empowering young people in Timor-Leste

Laura Keenan's picture

Timor-Leste has one of the youngest populations in the world, with more than three quarters under 30. Opening pathways for young people – allowing them to get an education, find employment and engage in public life – will be critical for building lasting peace and development.

Pages