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Environment

Keeping the Wonder in the Pacific

Aleta Moriarty's picture
The ocean represents transport, food, culture and livelihoods for people of the Pacific.

A few years ago in Papua New Guinea on a holiday I was lucky enough to spend a day with a fisherman who took me out on his dugout canoe. For hours we slowly skimmed along the surface of the ocean, the clear water providing a wonderful lens to the world below teeming with life. Fish, starfish, coral, eels, plants—a world beyond my wildest imagination.

He pointed out the plants he ate and others he used as traditional medicine. He showed me innocuous-looking creatures that would spell certain death. He showed me the craggy hiding hole of the tail-less crocodile that was the lead character in village folklore. He showed me the fish he caught that fed his family and provided him with an income and how his father had taught him to catch them, like he too had taught his children.

Eco-resorts booming in idyllic Solomon Islands

David Potten's picture
The garden behind the LoLoMo Resort, where hundreds of flowering wild orchids thrive.

(Read Part 1 and Part 3 of this blog post)

We walked down through mud and coral as we headed back to our boat. This marked the end of the first part of our trip – visiting health posts in Temarae and Baeroko. Our boat now went back through the narrow channel leading towards Munda, and then turned again into a series of spectacular lagoons. Several simple tourist resorts had been built on the islands here and one of these was our next destination.

The rain stopped as we approached LoLoMo eco-resort. “Idyllic” is an over-used word in the Pacific, but this resort, with eight rooms built from local materials on stilts at the edge of a sheltered channel between two islands, with hundreds of fish easily visible in the clear emerald blue water, an extraordinary “garden” of hundreds of flowering wild orchids behind the huts, oaths into the thick forest for bird-watchers to explore  and a restaurant area where we were served a magnificent spread of lobster, shellfish and sea-fish really was something out of a tourist brochure's dream world. (and for me the kittens running around were yet another attraction).

Samoa after the disaster: The wave of fire and the kid called Tsunami

Aleta Moriarty's picture

In June 2009 Samoa was the set for the popular TV program Survivor. It was a fantastic choice. It is one of those picture-perfect places–shady palms, trees dripping with fruit, blossoming hibiscus, all framed by powder sand beaches. It is a vastly understated paradise.

A few months later, the country was once again centre stage. This time for something utterly distressing and heart-breaking as the country embarked on the harrowing search for real life survivors after they were struck by a powerful tsunami on 29 September 2009.

Galu afi means “wave of fire” and is the traditional Samoan word used to describe a tsunami. It describes the force that gains momentum as the wave generates and the sheer destruction that it brings to bear. That is what happened here.

Perlu pencarian terobosan inovasi, kirim ide anda sekarang

Jean-Louis Racine's picture

Available in English

Henry Ford pernah berkata, ketika ia bertanya kepada para konsumen apa yang mereka mau, mereka menjawab kuda yang lebih cepat. Andai saja ia mendengar permintaan konsumennya, mungkin saja Ford Motor Company tidak akan pernah ada, atau ada tetapi dengan nama Ford Faster Horse Company. Pada saat itu mobil menjadi apa yang disebut “pencarian terobosan inovasi”, yang berarti secara radikal menggantikan teknologi yang ada (kuda dan kereta kuda), tidak dengan mendengar permintaan sebagian besar konsumen tapi mencoba mencari tahu kebutuhan mereka yang sebenarnya.

Where wild tigers roam

Anne Elicaño's picture
No tigers made an appearance but this little fellow emerged from across the stream while I was at a lookout tower in Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary, Thailand.

ภาษาไทย | Español

There are only about 250 tigers in the wild left in Thailand and around 3,200* globally. Not a single one made an appearance when I covered the Global Tiger Initiative’s Regional Training on the Smart Patrol System at the Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary but I learned more about tigers then than I ever did at a zoo.

ณ ป่าที่เสือใช้ชีวิตอย่างอิสระ

Anne Elicaño's picture
ไม่มีเสือออกมาให้เห็น แต่ช้างป่าตัวนี้เดินข้ามลำห้วยตอนที่ฉันกำลังส่องสัตว์
ในเขตรักษาพันธุ์สัตว์ป่าห้วยขาแข้ง

English | Español

เสือในป่าธรรมชาติในประเทศไทยเหลือเพียงประมาณ 250 ตัวและประมาณ 3,200* ตัว ทั่วโลกพวกมันไม่ปรากฏตัวให้ฉันเห็นเลยในระหว่างที่ฉันปฏิบัติงานร่วมอยู่กับการฝึกอบรมระบบลาดตระเวนเชิงคุณภาพซึ่งเป็นการฝึกอมรมในส่วนภูมิภาคของโครงการโกลบอลไทเกอร์ (Global Tiger Initiatives) ณเขตรักษาพันธุ์สัตว์ป่าห้วยขาแข้งแต่ฉันได้เรียนรู้เกี่ยวกับพวกมันมากกว่าที่ฉันเคยเรียนรู้มาทั้งหมดจากสวนสัตว์ 
 

Vietnam: Say NO to plastic bags for a prosperous Year of the Dragon

Hoang Duc Minh's picture

Cũng có ở Tiếng việt

 
Pop singer Ngoc Khue and MC My Linh, along with 80 volunteers, took part in a flash mob to support the ‘I Hate Nylon’ project.

These days, when most people in Vietnam stay home to celebrate the Lunar New Year (locally known as Tet holiday), hundreds of Vietnamese youth flocked to the streets of Hanoi, the country’s capital, to work on a community project to reduce plastic bag usage in the city.

The ‘I Hate Nylon’ project (plastic bags are commonly called nylon bags in Vietnam) aims to raise Vietnamese people’s awareness about the dangers of plastic bag usage through several community activities before the Lunar New Year, the biggest holiday in Vietnam when people consume a lot of plastic bags.

Việt Nam: Nói KHÔNG với túi nylon vì một năm con Rồng thịnh vượng

Hoang Duc Minh's picture

Available in English

 
Ca sỹ Ngọc Khuê, MC Mỹ Linh cùng 80 tình nguyện viên, khiêu vũ và tham gia vào dự án "Tôi ghét nilon"

Những ngày này, trong khi đa số người dân ở Việt Nam đang quây quần bên gia đình đón năm mới thì hàng trăm bạn trẻ tại Hà Nội lại lao ra đường để tham gia vào một dự án cộng đồng nhằm giảm thiểu sử dụng túi nylon trong thành phố.

Dự án Tôi Ghét Nylon (túi nhựa là thường được gọi là túi nylon tại Việt Nam) nhằm nâng cao nhận thức của người dân Việt Nam về nguy cơ của việc sử dụng túi nylon thông qua nhiều hoạt động cộng đồng trước Tết Nguyên đán, kỳ nghỉ lớn nhất tại Việt Nam khi người dân tiêu thụ rất nhiều túi nylon.

Dự án được khởi động vào đúng ngày Tết Ông Công, Ông Táo năm nay, là ngày 16/1/2012 theo Dương lịch. Theo truyền thuyết, vào ngày này, ba vị thần bếp núc lại cưỡi cá chép bay về trời và báo cáo những gì chủ nhà đã làm trong năm qua trên những con cá chép. Người dân có thói quen thả ba con cá chép và tro hương xuống hồ nhằm “tiễn ông Táo về trời”. Trước đây - khi túi nylon chưa phổ biến, người dân vẫn thường thả cá bằng bát hoặc chậu. Mấy năm trở lại đây, túi nylon ngày càng được dung nhiều hơn để thay thế. Vì vậy mà sau mỗi dịp Tết Ông Công Ông Táo, các hồ trong thành phố đều tràn ngập túi nylon.

Laos: How the Nam Theun 2 dam is managed during flood events

William Rex's picture

William RexIt’s been an unusually severe rainy season in some parts of Lao PDR, with several typhoons passing over after making landfall in Vietnam.  Thailand is also severely hit, with Bangkok bracing itself for floods as I write this

In Queensland, no great barrier to flood recovery

Henrike Brecht's picture

The New Year was not so happy in Queensland, Australia. In December 2010 and January 2011, floods swept across the state and at the beginning of February 2011, cyclone Yasi, a category 5 storm, struck near Cairns. Dozens died, hundreds were evacuated, thousands were affected and an excess of US$15 billion of damages were caused. A state of emergency was declared in all but one of the 75 councils. Seventy percent of the state was impacted; an area five times the size of the United Kingdom. 

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