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Governance

Việt Nam nghiên cứu kinh nghiệm Ma-lai-xi-a về xây dựng nhà nước kiến tạo

Jana Kunicova's picture
Also available in: English
Photo: Sasin Tipchai/bigstock


Khát vọng của Việt Nam là trở thành một quốc gia thịnh vượng, sáng tạo, công bằng, và dân chủ vào năm 2035. Muốn đạt được mục tiêu đầy tham vọng này thì Việt Nam cần chuyển đổi nhiều lĩnh vực cả về kinh tế, xã hội, và chính trị.

Cốt lõi của quá trình chuyển đổi này là việc xác định lại vai trò của nhà nước trong quản lý kinh tế. Trong quá trình thích nghi với vai trò quản trị kinh tế, nhà nước phải trở thành một nhà kiến tạo khôn khéo nhằm phát triển ba mối quan hệ: giữa các cơ quan nhà nước với nhau, giữa nhà nước với thị trường, và giữa nhà nước với người dân.

Cách đây chưa lâu, Ma-lai-xi-a cũng trải qua quá trình tương tự như Việt Nam hiện nay, với việc thực hiện một quá trình chuyển đổi trên nhiều lĩnh vực. Năm 2009 Ma-lai-xi-a bắt đầu thực hiện Chương trình cải cách quốc gia (National Transformation Program – NTP) tập trung vào hai lĩnh vực cải cách chính phủ và cải cách kinh tế. Ma-lai-xi-a đã áp dụng nhiều thực tiễn tốt nhằm đơn giản hoá quản lý nhà nước, giúp các doanh nghiệp tương tác dễ dàng hơn với nhà nước.

The role of development financial institutions in the new millennium

José de Luna-Martínez's picture
Around the world, development financial institutions help to promote economic growth, support social development and alleviate poverty.
Photo: bigstock/Elena Larina
Are national development financial institutions (DFIs) still relevant? What are the critical factors that make these institutions succeed? What are concrete examples of sound, well-administered and innovative DFIs? Why do they still remain in business in countries with large and sophisticated financial systems? How can we assess their economic and social impact? Have our views on DFIs evolved in the past decades?
 

Vietnam studies Malaysia’s experience with facilitating state relationships

Jana Kunicova's picture
Also available in: Tiếng Việt
Photo: Sasin Tipchai/bigstock



Vietnam has a vision. By 2035, it aspires to become a prosperous, creative, equitable and democratic nation. Achieving this ambitious goal has set Vietnam on a path of transformation on multiple fronts – economic, social, and political.

At the core of this transformation is the re-orientation of the state’s role in economic management.  This requires adapting Vietnam’s economic governance so that the state becomes a skilled facilitator of three types of relationships: among government agencies, between the state and market, and between the state and citizens. 

Not too long ago, Malaysia walked in Vietnam’s shoes, implementing its own wide-ranging transformation. In 2009, Malaysia embarked on the National Transformation Program (NTP) that included focus on both government and economic transformations.  Malaysia had also adopted good practices that simplified regulations, which made it easier for firms to interact with the state.

Making social accountability part of Mongolia’s DNA

Marcela Rozo's picture
Mongolia has made good progress in its economic and political transitions during the last two decades, but this growth has not been fully translated into improved quality of public services, particularly for the poor and vulnerable. Despite the government’s legal and regulatory reforms to improve transparency and citizen participation in the management of public funds, the pace of implementation is still lagging.  

As Mongolia suffers with economic instability due to external and internal circumstances, how can we improve performance of basic public services in a way that works well in the Mongolian context but also brings sustained outcomes?
Local champions for social accountability are building their vision for the project.
© SDC and World Bank Mongolia

Integrated Financial and Procurement Audits for Bank Financed Projects - The China Experience

Jingrong He's picture
Also available in: 中文
Supreme Audit Institutions (SAI) for Bank financed projects have carried out financial and procurement audits. In Poland, this initially started more than a decade ago and there have been several other examples over the past years in other countries.

By the end of FY16, China National Audit Office (CNAO), the SAI in China, had successfully completed its third year of integrated financial and procurement audits for 27 Bank financed projects and accounting for 28% of the total active portfolio of China. This is a big leap from only 3 projects in the first year of FY14.

Rome was not built in a day. CNAO has been the external auditor of all Bank-financed projects in China since 1984. It conducts project audits in accordance with the Government Auditing Standards of the P.R. China and the International Standards on Auditing. The Foreign Funds Application Audit Department and the Audit Service Center of CNAO, and the Provincial Audit Institutions conduct audits on Bank financed projects and issue the audit reports in their names. There are about 120-130 financial audit reports submitted to the Bank every year. CNAO's audit reports not only include the auditor's opinion on project financial statements, they also include opinions on procurement compliance as this is an important aspect of the review of the eligibility of expenditures. This procedure is in full compliance with the Audit Law of P. R. China, which requires auditing of authenticity, legality and beneficial results of the budgetary revenues and expenditures or financial revenues and expenditures of public funds. It was under this context that in FY 14, we started piloting the use of CNAO for integrated financial and procurement audits in some Bank-financed projects.

Myanmar: How IDA can help countries reduce poverty and build shared prosperity

Victoria Kwakwa's picture
© Meriem Gray/World Bank



This week, more than fifty donor governments and representatives of borrowing member countries are gathering in Nay Pyi Taw to discuss how the World Bank’s International Development Association (IDA) can continue to help the world’s poorest countries.

IDA financing helps the world’s 77 poorest countries address big development issues. With IDA’s help, hundreds of millions of people have escaped poverty. This has been done through the creation of jobs, access to clean water, schools, roads, nutrition, electricity and more. During the past five years, IDA funding helped immunize 205 million children globally, provided access to better water sources for 50 million and access to health services for 413 million people.

Immigrant labor: Can it help Malaysia’s economic development?

Rafael Munoz Moreno's picture


Malaysia has been able to reach remarkable achievements over the past decades, including extreme poverty eradication and promotion of inclusive growth. It aims to reach a high-income nation status by 2020, which goes beyond merely reaching a per capita GDP threshold. As the 11th Malaysia Plan points out, the goal is to achieve a growth path that is sustainable over time, reflects greater productivity, and is inclusive. High-income status can be achieved if we ensure that future generations have access to all the resources, such as education and productive opportunities, necessary to realize their ambitions and if Malaysia’s economy is globally competitive and resource-sustainable.

Over the years, immigrants have played a crucial role in the economic development of Malaysia, with around 2.1 million immigrants registered and over 1 million undocumented as of 2013. Education levels among the Malaysian population have increased remarkably over the last two decades, and immigrant workers have become one of the primary sources of labor for low-skilled occupations, most commonly in labor-intensive sectors such as construction, agriculture and manufacturing. Economic studies show that a 10% net increase in low-skilled foreign workers could raise Malaysia’s GDP by 1.1% and create employment and increase wages for most Malaysians.

中国城市可以从新加坡借鉴哪些经验?

Wanli Fang's picture
Also available in: English
新加坡Marina海湾的再开发项目将河道的一部分改造成水库。摄影: 10 FACE/Shutterstock

上周,我有幸参加了新加坡城市周活动。一同参加本次活动的还有世行驻华代表处的其他同事以及来自中国政府和参与世行项目的城市代表。对我们参会者而言,此行可以说是开阔眼界,使我们更清晰地了解到综合性的城市规划方法对构建可持续城市所起的重要作用,并为我们提供了诸多可推广的经验。这些经验稍加调整后即可为实现不同城市自身发展的目标提供实用的解决方案。以下几点经验供大家参考:
 
发展战略以人为本
 
要做到这一点,需要城市规划人员时刻关注市民对城市空间的日常体验,并通过公众参与请市民在决策过程发挥作用。譬如,在许多城市,公共交通被视为一种低端且不具备吸引力的出行方式,即便在交通拥堵严重情况下,公交载客量增长也停滞不前。但在新加坡,2014年公共交通在各种出行方式中的占比高达三分之二。在该市,乘坐地铁出行不仅舒适而且高效,因为各种公交工具和线路之间的换乘很方便,有明确的标识指引系统,换乘站点之间建有配备空调的连接走廊,并且为老年乘客和行动不便的乘客配置了考虑周到的空间设计和服务设施。此外,地铁站与主要零售和商业设施以及其它公共服务设施融合在一起,从而大大减少了最后一公里的连接问题。
 

What can Chinese cities learn from Singapore?

Wanli Fang's picture
Also available in: 中文
One of Singapore’s latest redevelopment projects included the construction of a freshwater reservoir. Photo: 10 FACE/Shutterstock

Last week, I had the opportunity to attend the Singapore Urban Week along with other colleagues from the World Bank Beijing office, as well as delegates from China’s national government and participating cities. For all of us, this trip to Singapore was an eye-opening experience that highlighted the essential role of integrated urban planning in building sustainable cities, and provided practical solutions that can be readily adapted to help achieve each city’s own development vision. A couple of key lessons learned:

Putting people at the center of development strategies

This is only possible when planners always keep in mind people’s daily experience of urban space and invite them as part of decision-making process through citizen engagement.

For instance, in many cities, public transit has been perceived as a low-end, unattractive option of travel, causing ridership to stagnate despite severe traffic congestion. But in Singapore, public transit accounts for 2/3 of the total travel modal share in 2014. Moving around the city by metro is comfortable and efficient because transfers between different modes and lines are easy, with clear signage of directions, air-conditioned connecting corridors, and considerate spatial designs and facilities for the elderly and physically-challenged users. In addition, metro stations are co-located with major retail and commercial activities and other urban amenities, significantly reducing last-mile connectivity issues.

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