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Information and Communication Technologies

One Map: accelerating unified land administration for Indonesia

Anna Wellenstein's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia
Photo: Curt Carnemark / World Bank


The primary forests have long gone from the surroundings of Teluk Bakung village on the outskirts of Pontianak, the capital of Indonesia’s West Kalimantan province. This was evident when I arrived in the region in late November 2016, as part of a field visit. We saw how most villagers have abandoned the difficult peatlands agriculture to work on large oil palm plantations and their own oil palm fields. Others have opted to invest in lucrative edible bird nest production. But they do so against a backdrop of confusing land-use management: forest estate and administrative boundary demarcation is incomplete, and community interest groups and authorities debate over the historical allocation of plantation concessions. Public data sets show a wide variety of land and forest uses in the area, including reserves. But in reality, virtually all of the land is increasingly being devoted to oil palm production.

阿里巴巴的“互联网+扶贫”实践

Ruidong Zhang's picture
Also available in: English
这是纪念10月17日国际消除贫困日的中国系列博客文章中的的一篇,中国对全球减贫事业的贡献超过世界任何国家,中国正在全力实现到2020年消除极端贫困的宏伟目标。 点击此处浏览系列中其他博客。

阿里巴巴对于贫困地区的“互联网+扶贫”最早始于2009年对四川省青川县的震后援建。阿里巴巴的核心思路是用商业模式扶持灾区经济发展,不仅要帮助灾区人民重建家园,更要通过互联网+赋能,使他们具备致富脱贫的能力。

2014年10月阿里巴巴发布了农村战略,在接下来的3-5年,将拿出100亿元投入到1000个县的10万个行政村,用于当地电子商务服务体系建设。

阿里巴巴“互联网+扶贫”的落地分为三个层面。一是给贫困地区带来便捷实惠的商品和生活服务。如消费品下乡、农产品进城、手机充值、生活缴费、购买车票、预定宾馆等,此外还包括小微金融、远程医疗、在线教育等。二是为农村经济和社会提供可持续发展的生态支持。包括对地方官员的互联网意识、地方企业的互联网转型能力,以及返乡青年或普通农民的互联网技能的培训和建设。三是帮助贫困地区建立起新经济基础设施,包括物流、支付、金融、云计算、数据等。

至2016年上半年,阿里巴巴通过农村淘宝项目已经在全国29个省近400个县(包括94个国家级贫困县和95个省级贫困县)的1.8万个村建立起了“互联网+”服务体系,招募了2万余名合伙人或淘帮手。2016年7月,农村淘宝启动以服务为核心的3.0模式,合伙人将由创业者演化为乡村服务者,村级服务站也将升级为当地的生态服务中心、创业孵化中心和公益文化中心。

阿里巴巴的“互联网+扶贫”实践,包括了在电商、就业、金融、旅游、教育、健康等多个领域的创新。

An example of how private corporations can help end poverty in China: Alibaba and the “Internet + Poverty Reduction”

Ruidong Zhang's picture
Also available in: 中文
This blog is part of a series produced to commemorate End Poverty Day (October 17), focusing on China – which has contributed more than any other country to global poverty reduction – and its efforts to end extreme poverty by 2020. Read the blog series here. 

Following a 2009 earthquake in Qingchuan County, Sichuan Province, Alibaba introduced the “Internet + Poverty Reduction” model, with the core concept to boost economic development in the affected areas with a business model that empowers people to move out of poverty using the Internet.

Alibaba announced its rural e-commerce strategy in October 2014, with a plan to invest RMB100 million (about $14.8 million) over the next three to five years in the development of local e-commerce service systems for 1,000 counties with 100,000 villages.

The program provides valuable services in three areas:
  1. Easy and affordable access to goods and services in poor areas including: delivery of consumer goods to rural areas and farm produce to cities, mobile phone recharge, utility bills payment, booking airline and train tickets, making hotel reservations, as well as microfinance, online medical consultation, and online learning;
  2. Provision of ecosystem support for sustainable rural development, including raising awareness about the Internet among local officials, building the capacity of local firms to use the Internet for business, Internet skills training for young people and farmers; and
  3. Infrastructure development for the new economy, including logistics infrastructure, payment systems, financial services, cloud computing and data collection. 
By mid-2016, Alibaba’s Rural Taobao Program established “Internet+” service systems in 18,000 villages in 400 counties (including about 200 poorest counties) in 29 provinces, and recruited more than 20,000 Taobao partners and helpers. In July, Rural Taobao launched its service-based 3.0 model, upgrading partners to rural service providers and village service stations to local service centers, business incubators and public-benefit cultural centers.
Alibaba’s “Internet + Poverty Reduction” features a number of innovations including e-commerce, job creation, access to finance, tourism development, education and healthcare.

The FinTech revolution: A perspective from Asia

José de Luna-Martínez's picture



Will cash and checks still exist 15 or 20 years from now given the increasing digitization of money? Is the smartphone our new bank? Will many people working in the financial sector industry lose their jobs due to growing use of technology, robots, algorithms, and online banking? Is financial technology (FinTech) the solution to providing financial services to the 2 billion people in the planet that still lack access to finance? Will digital currencies and other innovative FinTech products pose systemic risks in the future? What is the best approach to regulate FinTech companies?

Islamic finance in Malaysia: Filling the gaps in financial inclusion

José de Luna-Martínez's picture



In the past decade, the Islamic finance industry has grown at double digits despite the weak global economic environment. By 2020, the Islamic finance industry is projected to reach $3 trillion in total assets with 1 billion users. However, despite its rapid growth and enormous potential, 7 out of 10 adults still do not have access to a bank account in Muslim countries. This means that 682 million adult Muslims still do not have an account at a banking institution. While some Muslim countries have high levels of account ownership (above 90 percent), there are others with less than 5 percent of their adult population who reported having a bank account.

แนวคิดสำหรับประเทศไทยในการเข้าสู่ยุคดิจิตอล

Ulrich Zachau's picture
Also available in: English

ทั่วโลกได้ประจักษณ์ถึงการปฏิวัติด้านสารสนเทศและการสื่อสารที่ยิ่งใหญ่ในประวัติศาสตร์ของมนุษยชาติ เทคโนโลยีดิจิตอลช่วยให้เราเข้าถึงข้อมูลจำนวนมหาศาลได้ตลอดเวลา ทำให้เราสามารถติดต่อกับญาติมิตรได้ง่ายขึ้น และเปิดโอกาสใหม่ๆ ให้ทั้งเรื่องธุรกิจและการพักผ่อน ดิจิตอลเทคโนโลยีคงจะก้าวต่อไปอย่างไร้ขีดจำกัด

การปฏิวัติด้านสารสนเทศนี้เข้าถึงนับพันล้านคนทั่วโลก และเชื่อมต่อกับคนเป็นวงกว้างขึ้นเรื่อยๆ อย่างไรก็ตาม ยังคงมีคนอีกมากที่ยังไม่ได้รับประโยชน์จากดิจิตอลเทคโนโลยีนี้  โลกนี้จึงยังมีทั้งคนที่มีและคนที่ไม่มีดิจิตอลเทคโนโลยีเลย 

ปัจจุบัน ประชากรโลกร้อยละ 95 สามารถเข้าถึงสัญญาณดิจิตอล เหลืออีกร้อยละ 5 ที่ยังไม่มีโอกาส ประชากรโลกร้อยละ 73 มีมือถือใช้ในขณะที่อีกร้อยละ 27 ยังไม่มี ประชากรร้อยละ 46 ซึ่งเป็นจำนวนเกือบจะครึ่งหนึ่งของประชากรโลกเข้าถึงอินเตอร์เนต แต่คนส่วนใหญ่ยังเข้าไม่ถึง และมีเพียงร้อยละ 19 ของคนทั่วโลกเท่านั้นที่เข้าถึงเทคโนโลยีการสื่อสารผ่านเครือข่ายอินเทอร์เน็ตความเร็วสูง  นอกจากนี้แล้ว ความแตกต่างในการเข้าถึงยังแบ่งได้หลายมิติ ทั้งตามเพศสภาพ ภูมิศาสตร์ อายุ รายได้ในแต่ละประเทศ

ทำไมเราต้องจัดการให้เกิดการใช้ประโยชน์จากดิจิตอลเทคโนโลยี และเราต้องทำอะไรบ้าง?

2006: Сургууль болгоныг номын сантай, Монголын хөдөөгийн хот, суурин болгоныг гар утас, интернэттэй болгоё

Jim Anderson's picture
Also available in: English

Албан бус орчуулга.

Монгол улс, Дэлхийн Банкны хамтын түншлэлийн 25 жилийн 16 дахь он болох 2006 оны тухай өнөөдөр авч үзье. Эдийн засаг өссөөр, жилийн өсөлтийн хурд 8.6 хувьд хүрч, ДНБ-д эзлэх аж үйлдвэрлэлийн хэмжээ 43 хувьд хүрлээ.

2006 он бол Дэлхийн Банкны хувьд гялалзсан он байсан бөгөөд энэ жил хэд хэдэн төсөл хэрэгжиж эхэлсэний нэг нь хөдөөгийн боловсролд чиглэгдсэн байсан юм.

Төсвийн зарцуулалтад хийсэн институтын болон засаглалын үнэлгээгээр хотод нэг багшид ногдох сурагчийн тоо хавьгүй өндөр байгаа нь харагдсан. Төсвийн зарцуулалтын судалгаагаар (PETS) өөр зүйлүүд ч бас ажиглагдсан. Тухайлбал, хөдөө орон нутгийн сурагчид хотын сурагчдыг бодвол шалгалтад хамаагүй бага оноо авч байгаа нь харагдсан. Энэ нь хаана сурах орчин таагүй байна, тэнд сурагчдын үзүүлэх амжилт муу байгаа уялдааг харуулсан хэрэг. Хөдөөгийн хүүхдүүдийн сургууль завсардалт өндөр байж, эрт сургуулиа орхиж байлаа. Хөдөөгийн хүүхдүүдэд сурах боломжийг илүүтэй олгох шаардлага байгаа нь дараа дараагийн жилүүдийн сэдэв байх нь тодорхой байлаа.

2006: Bringing libraries to every classroom, and mobile telephones and internet to every town, in rural Mongolia

Jim Anderson's picture
Also available in: Mongolian

Today we look at 2006, the 16th year of the 25 year partnership between Mongolia and the World Bank. The economy continued to grow, checking in at 8.6% for the year, as did industry’s share of GDP which peaked that year at 43%. 

The year 2006 was a banner year for the World Bank’s program in Mongolia, with several iconic projects approved that year, starting with one in rural education. 

An institutional and governance review of budget expenditure for education found that the pupil-per-teacher ratio is higher in urban schools. Among other findings, the Public Expenditure Tracking Survey (PETS), on which the report was based, illustrated that students in rural schools obtained significantly lower test scores than those from urban schools, consistent with “a pattern where the more disadvantaged — and therefore lower-performing students — systematically fail to advance their schooling and drop out at a younger age in the rural areas.”  The need to provide rural children better education opportunities, which had been a theme for years, had further evidence.

Ideas for Thailand’s digital transformation

Ulrich Zachau's picture
Also available in: ภาษาไทย


The world is witnessing the greatest information and communications revolution in human history. Digital technologies provide access to huge amounts of information at all times, allow us to stay in touch with friends and relatives much more easily, and offer new opportunities for business and leisure. The sky is the limit!

The information revolution has reached billions of people around the world, and more people get connected every day.  However, many others are not yet sharing in the benefits of modern digital technologies.  There are the digital “haves” and digital “have nots”.   

Today, 95% of the global population have access to a digital signal, but 5% do not; 73% have mobile phones, but 27% do not; slightly less than half of all people (46%) have internet, but the majority do not; and only 19% of the world’s population has broadband. There also are persistent digital divides across gender, geography, age, and income dimensions within each country.

Why should we care about overcoming this digital divide, and what can we do?

Confessions of a mobile phone skeptic in the Pacific

Laura Keenan's picture


I must admit to being notoriously bad with a mobile phone. I forget to take it with me, leave it in parks and cafés and have never migrated to a smart phone – a simple old Nokia handset is my trusty aide. And on my part this has probably contributed to some skepticism about the discussion of development and mobile phones – which can sometimes seem a little evangelical.

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