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Law and Regulation

2008: Нийтлэг зорилгоо тодорхойлох нь

Erdene-Ochir Badarch's picture
Also available in: English

Албан бус орчуулга.

Дэлхийн Банк болон Монгол улсын хамтын ажиллагааны 25 жилийн түүхийг бид жил жилээр эргэн харж байгаа. Өнөөдөр бид 2008 оныг авч үзье. 2008 он монголчуудын хувьд хар, цагаан аль алинаар нь дурсагдан үлдэх он болсон. Хар гэдэг нь 2008 оны парламентын сонгуулиас үүдэлтэй хэрэг явдал байлаа. Жирийн таван иргэн амиа алдаж, нийслэл Улаанбаатар хотод хоёр өдөр, гурван шөнө онц байдал тогтоосон. 1990 онд Монгол улс нэг тогтолцооноос нөгөө рүү тайван замаар шилжсэнээрээ бахархаж байсан бол 2008 оны хэрэг явдал нь ардчиллын 25 жилийн түүхэн дэх хамгийн хар цаг үе байлаа.

2008 энэхүү хар хэрэг явдлын дараахан Найдангийн Түвшинбаяр Бээжингийн олимпоос Монголын анхны олимпийн алтан медалийг хүртсэн юм. Төв талбайдаа цуглан Монголынхоо далбааг намируулж, алга ташин баяр хүргэж байсан хүмүүсиййн царайг би хэзээ ч мартахгүй. Дэлхийн Банкны Монголыг хариуцсан захирал Дэвид Доллар энэ түүхэн үйл явдлын гэрч бөгөөд “Энэ үйл явдал нь өрсөлдөгч улс төрийн намынхан хоорондоо гар барьж, бахархлаа хуваалцахаар ач холбогдолтой байсан юм” гэж бичсэн байдаг.

2008: Defining common goals through deliberation

Erdene-Ochir Badarch's picture
Also available in: Mongolian

Continuing with our series looking at the 25 year partnership between Mongolia and the World Bank, today we look at 2008, a year that will be remembered by many Mongolians for events both high and low. The low point was the riot that followed parliamentary elections on 1st July, 2008. Five innocent lives were lost and Ulaanbaatar city was under a state emergency for two days and three nights. While Mongolia is rightfully praised for its peaceful transition from one regime to another in 1990, this incident of 2008 will be remembered as the darkest time in the 25 years of democracy.

The high of 2008 occurred after this riot when Mr. Tuvshinbayr Naidan brought home Mongolia’s 1st ever gold medal from the Beijing summer Olympics. I will never forget the sight of people waving our national flag, gathering in the Central Square and cheering with exhilaration.   The World Bank’s Country Director, David Dollar, also celebrated this historic occasion, noting that “The event was important enough to get rival political parties to shake hands and share the pride.”

East Asia and Pacific countries can do better in labor regulation and social protection

Truman Packard's picture

Those unfamiliar with the fast growing emerging economies of East Asia are likely to think that governments in these countries let market forces and capitalism roam free, red in tooth and claw. That was certainly my impression before coming to work in the region, and generally that held at the outset of our work by the group of us that wrote a new World Bank report “East Asia Pacific At Work: Employment, Enterprise and Wellbeing” .

The report shows just how wrong we were. We could be forgiven this impression—many of us had come from assignments in Latin America and the Caribbean or in Europe and Central Asia, where the distortions and rigidities from labor regulation and poorly designed social protection are rife, and where policy makers cast envious looks at the stellar and sustained employment outcomes in East Asia.

Well, it turns out that although they came relatively late to labor regulation and social protection, many governments in the region have entered this arena with gusto. We were surprised to find that, going just by what is written in their labor codes, the average level of employment protection in East Asia is actually higher than the OECD average.


Garo Batmanian's picture
Also available in: English



From farm to chopsticks: Improving food safety in China

Garo Batmanian's picture
Also available in: 中文
A challenge for Chinese businesses is to re-capture the vast domestic market owing to the recent food scares that have seriously undermined the domestic brands.

After several high-profile food safety incidents, according to one recent survey, around 64% of Chinese consider food safety as the number one priority that affects their daily lives and requires immediate action by the government.

The Chinese government is taking these concerns very seriously and has launched important reforms in its system of food control. It promulgated a new Food Safety Law in 2009, and created a new food safety authority in 2013 to deal with these issues. These reforms are now rolling out to provincial and local levels. These reforms will eventually affect more than one million state officials, restructure more than a dozen government ministries, and revise more than 5,000 regulations. The reforms will result in a complete overhaul of the food control system and introduction of new global best practice policies for food safety.

Hybrid Courts in East Asia & Pacific: Does the international community have a role to play?

Peter Chapman's picture

In my previous entry, I asked what role the World Bank and other donors might be able to play in exploring whether hybrid courts might help enhance access to justice. I believe there are three key areas where we in the international community might be able to support country discussions of whether and how to incorporate community justice systems through hybrid courts.

Hybrid Courts in East Asia & Pacific: A recipe for success?

Peter Chapman's picture
Daru Village Court in Papua New Guinea

What accounts for whether hybrid courts stick as relevant and useful institutions, as opposed to withering as a ‘neither-nor’ – neither regarded as a familiar community mechanism, nor as having the full backing of the state? In my previous blog entry, “History of Hybrid Courts in East Asia & Pacific: A ‘best fit’ approach to justice reform?”, I discussed the emergence of hybrid courts. In this post, I’ll raise three elements which seem to be essential characteristics of successful hybrid court systems: legitimacy, effectiveness, and flexibility.

History of Hybrid Courts in East Asia & Pacific: A ‘best fit’ approach to justice reform?

Peter Chapman's picture
Peter Chapman

It took 41 years for the fastest developing 20 countries in the 20th century to achieve basic transformations in the rule of law.  However, the World Development Report 2011 suggests that fragile countries cannot afford to wait that long.  Instead, in managing disputes, it is imperative for governments and the international community to support arrangements that fit each country context, take into account capacity constraints in government and the local level, and respond to the needs of users. Justice reform should be measured accordingly from a functional perspective—based on the needs of users—rather than abstract modeling of institutions on western approaches.