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Poverty

Indonesia’s Social Assistance System: Praising Reforms But More Work Ahead

Pablo Acosta's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



When the Bank did its first social assistance public expenditure review in Indonesia in 2012, the diagnosis was clear. Despite spending significant amount of resources in “welfare”, most of them were through expensive subsidies (fuel, electricity, rice) that were not necessarily benefiting the most vulnerable segments of the society. General subsidies represented 20 percent of total national budget, but household targeted social assistance programs were already making their way, increasing from 0.3 to 0.5 percent of GDP between 2004 and 2010. Still, there was an overall dissatisfaction on what had been achieved, with the Gini coefficient rose by about 6 percentage points in the period of 2005 to 2012.

With more than 27 million people still considered poor and as one of the countries in the East Asia and the Pacific region that has one of the highest income inequality levels, the coverage expansion and social assistance system strengthening is a must. Fortunately, the situation in the social assistance sector has changed dramatically.

Sistem Bantuan Sosial Indonesia: Reformasi Berjalan Baik, Namun Masih Banyak Pekerjaan Lain

Pablo Acosta's picture
Also available in: English



Ketika Bank Dunia melakukan kajian pertama terkait pengeluaran bantuan sosial di Indonesia di tahun 2012, diagnosisnya sudah jelas. Meskipun telah banyak sumber daya yang dihabiskan untuk  "kesejahteraan", sebagian besar dari upaya ini dilakukan melalui subsidi yang mahal (bahan bakar, listrik, beras) yang belum tentu bermanfaat untuk segmen masyarakat yang paling rentan. Subsidi umum mewakili 20 persen dari total anggaran nasional, namun program bantuan sosial yang ditargetkan untuk rumah tangga telah berjalan, meningkat dari 0,3 persen PDB menjadi 0,5 persen antara tahun 2004 dan 2010. Namun, dengan koefisien Gini yang meningkat sekitar 6 poin persentase pada periode 2005-2012, masih ada ketidakpuasan dalam pencapaian selama ini.  

Dengan adanya lebih dari 27 juta orang yang termasuk golongan miskin dan sebagai salah satu negara di kawasan Asia Timur dan Pasifik yang memiliki tingkat ketimpangan pendapatan tertinggi, maka perluasan cakupan dan penguatan sistem bantuan sosial adalah suatu keharusan. Untungnya, situasi di sektor bantuan sosial telah berubah secara dramatis.

การคุ้มครองครัวเรือนยากจนไทยเมื่อเผชิญภาวะเศรษฐกิจที่ยากลำบาก

Philip O’Keefe's picture
Also available in: English
ชายสูงอายุนั่งรอรับยาที่โรงพยาบาลในประเทศไทย
  ภาพโดย: ตฤณ สุวรรณนภา 

ประเทศไทยเพิ่งประกาศโครงการช่วยเหลือทางสังคมเพื่อครัวเรือนที่ยากจน  โครงการนี้จะสามารถลดความยากจนอย่างมีนัยสำคัญ ซึ่งจะช่วยให้ประเทศไทยเข้าไปอยู่ในกลุ่มประเทศที่รายได้ปานกลางซึ่งมีโครงการ “ตาข่ายความปลอดภัยทางสังคม” ให้กับคนยากจนเช่นเดียวกับประเทศจีน มาเลเซีย บราซิล ตุรกี และฟิลิปปินส์.

Protecting Poor Thai Families from Economic Hardship

Philip O’Keefe's picture
Also available in: ภาษาไทย
An elderly man waits for medicine at a hospital counter in Thailand. Photo: Trinn Suwannapha/World Bank

Thailand recently announced that it will put into action a national social assistance program for poor families. Such a program can help reduce poverty significantly. It would also move Thailand into the growing ranks of middle-income countries, such as China, Malaysia, Brazil, Turkey and the Philippines, that provide the poor with a ‘safety net’.

How do we achieve sustained growth? Through human capital, and East Asia and the Pacific proves it

Michael Crawford's picture
Students at Beijing Bayi High School in China. Photo: World Bank


In 1950, the average working-age person in the world had  almost three years of education, but in East Asia and Pacific (EAP), the  average person had less than half that amount. Around this time, countries in  the EAP  region put themselves on a path that focused on growth  driven by human capital. They made significant and steady investments in  schooling to close the educational attainment gap with the rest of the world. While  improving their school systems, they also put their human capital to work in  labor markets. As a result, economic growth has been stellar: for four decades  EAP has grown at roughly twice the pace of the global average. What is more, no  slowdown is in sight for rising prosperity.

High economic growth and strong human capital accumulation  are deeply intertwined. In a recent paper, Daron Acemoglu and David Autor explore  the way skills and labor markets interact: Human capital is the central  determinant of economic growth and is the main—and very likely the only—means  to achieve shared growth when technology is changing quickly and raising the  demand for skills. Skills promote productivity and growth, but if there are not  enough skilled workers, growth soon chokes off. If, by contrast, skills are abundant and  average skill-levels keep rising, technological change can drive productivity  and growth without stoking inequality.

Land at the heart of Myanmar’s transition: Part 1

Anna Wellenstein's picture

Also available in: Myanmar (.pdf)


 

Mike-Petteri Torhonen / World Bank




Struggles over land in Myanmar have been a defining characteristic of the country’s six decades of armed conflict.
 
In the past, government acquired lands for extracting natural resources, commercialized farming, and ambitious infrastructure projects, such as building of the new capital city of Nay Pyi Taw. Today, claims over land acquisition injustices dominate public discourse and the new government’s agenda. In parallel, infrastructure and institutions for land administration and property markets are grossly outdated and weak.

Phenomenal development: New MOOC draws economic policy lessons from South Korea’s transformation

Sheila Jagannathan's picture

The World Bank Group’s Open Learning Campus (OLC) launched a free Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) today — Policy Lessons from South Korea’s Development — through the edX platform, with approximately 7,000 global learners already registered. In this MOOC, prominent representatives of academic and research institutions in South Korea and the United States narrate a multi-faceted story of Korea’s economic growth. 
 
Why focus on South Korea? South Korea's transformation from poverty to prosperity in just three decades was virtually miraculous. Indeed, by almost any measure, South Korea is one of the greatest development success stories. South Korea’s income per capita rose nearly 250 times, from a mere $110 in 1962 to $27,440 in 2015. This rapid growth was achieved despite geopolitical uncertainties and a lack of natural resources. Today, South Korea is a major exporter of products such as semiconductors, automobiles, telecommunications equipment, and ships.

Source: World Development Indicators, 12/16/2016

Sustainable Growth in Lao PDR Will Lead to Poverty Reduction and Better Lives for All

Victoria Kwakwa's picture



My visit to Lao PDR this week has convinced me that this nation is moving toward the right path to sustained economic growth, which could lead to less poverty and better lives for all of its people.
 
Over the past two decades, Lao PDR has made significant development progress. It is one of the fastest growing economies in East Asia, with GDP growth averaging 8 percent a year since 2000. Lao PDR also successfully met the Millennium Development Goal of reducing extreme poverty, based on its national poverty line, to below 24 percent by 2015 from 33.5 percent in 2002.
 
As I have witnessed during my trip, people are enjoying better living conditions, with improved access to water supply, sanitation, roads, and power. Indeed, Lao PDR’s electrification program is one of the most successful in the world, and more than 90 percent of households now have access to electricity. Lao PDR also has built 50 percent more road surfaces in the last decade, and two-thirds of all Lao villages are now connected by all-season roads.

“四小”不小,管用就好

Sitie Wang's picture
Also available in: English
这是纪念10月17日国际消除贫困日的中国系列博客文章中的的一篇,中国对全球减贫事业的贡献超过世界任何国家,中国正在全力实现到2020年消除极端贫困的宏伟目标。 点击此处浏览系列中其他博客。
 
四月中旬,我们到川东开展精准扶贫调研,看了南部县大堰乡封坎庙村、碑院镇林坝村的扶贫“四小工程”:小养殖、小庭院、小作坊和小买卖。果林下,百余只土鸡正在啄食;水田里,一群鸭子正在游弋……这就是我们在林坝村脱贫户张定科家门前看到的一幕。今年61岁的张定科给我们介绍说:“在家门口搞点鸡、鸭等小养殖,还养猪,投资少见效快,真是再实在不过了。”他还告诉我们,以前他家以种地为生,日子过得紧巴巴的。随着两个子女先后考入大学,家里的日子变得愈发艰难。去年初,他家在帮扶部门的支持下搞起了小养殖、小买卖,年底增收1.70万余元,摆脱了贫困。

Ending Poverty in China: Small projects bring big benefits

Sitie Wang's picture
Also available in: 中文
This blog is part of a series produced to commemorate End Poverty Day (October 17), focusing on China – which has contributed more than any other country to global poverty reduction – and its efforts to end extreme poverty by 2020. Read the blog series here. 
 

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