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Poverty

NT2 - Compensating villagers for direct losses from the project

Nanda Gasparini's picture

As I made my way down route 13 last week I wondered how many times I had been to Nam Theun 2 since my first visit in October 2006. I’m certainly not one of the people that go there the most, and yet I could recall at least 20 visits.

Lessons from China for Africa - my take

David Dollar's picture

Thirty African officials visited China for 12 days in May on a pilot South-South knowledge exchange organized by the Chinese government with assistance from the World Bank.  My colleague, Phil Karp, has written about the program, including the study tour around China that he accompani

China-Africa learning on development -- lessons for and from all involved

Philip E. Karp's picture

I recently had the pleasure of accompanying a group of 15 senior officials from East and Southern Africa on a field visit to Guangxi Autonomous Region and Guangdong Province.  Prior to the field visit, the officials had spent three days in Beijing at a workshop on China’s development experience.

Picture the figures of the food crisis

Claudia Gabarain's picture

Using data from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the OECD, BBC News online created some interesting graphics showing the impact of and factors in the current food crisis. They include a 30-year look at food commodity prices, US ethanol production, world population growth, changing eating habits, and demand for biofuels among others. Worth a look.

Rising food prices and East Asia: trends and options

Milan Brahmbhatt's picture

Soaring food prices have suddenly become a major concern for policy makers in East Asia.  The price of rice - which provides one third of the region's caloric intake - is a particular worry.  Rice prices have been moving higher since around 2004, although this was from very depressed levels in the early years of the decade.  Prices surpassed $300 a ton in early 2006 for the first time since the late 1990s, kept moving higher, and then took off at an accelerating pace from late 2007:  up 11 percent in the the fourth quarter, then 56 percent in the first quarter of 2008 an

NT2: Not a World Bank hydropower project

William Rex's picture

A few weeks ago I wrote that “many perceive NT2 to be a World Bank hydropower project. From my perspective, that’s inaccurate in every respect. More on that in a future posting.” Following intense pressure from my reading public (thanks, Nanda), it’s time to explain what I meant.

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