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Ядуурлыг арилгах цаг нь одоо

Jim Anderson's picture
Also available in: English

Аравдугаар сарын 17 бол Ядуурлыг арилгах олон улсын өдөр. Уг нь өдөр бүр ядуурлыг арилгах өдөр байх ёстой ч тодорхой нэг өдрийг ингэж онцолсноор бидний хүрэх гэж байгаа зорилгыг илүү ойлгуулдаг юм.

Монголын ядуурлын түвшин 2010-2012 оны хооронд, мөн 2012-2014 хооронд үргэлжлэн буурсан. Ядуурлын түвшин нь эдийн засгийн өсөлттэй хамааралтай байдаг учраас энэ үзүүлэлт гайхмаар зүйл биш. Дурдсан хугацаанд иргэдийн орлого нэмэгдсэн нь ядуурлыг бууруулахад дэм үзүүлсэн. Эдийн засгийн өсөлт нь хөдөө аж ахуйгаас бусад салбарын цалин нэмэгдсэн, мөн хөдөө аж ахуйн салбарын цалингаас бусад орлого нэмэгдсэнээс үүдэлтэй. Монголын нийгмийн шилжилтийн ерөнхий төлөв байдал ч бас өөрийн хувь нэмрээ оруулсан: 2010 онд 38.8 хувьтай байсан ядуурал 2014 онд 21.6 хувь руу буусан.

Тэр үед юу болсон, харин одоо юу болж байна вэ?

中国减贫成就、挑战与展望

Chengwei Huang's picture
Also available in: English
这是纪念1017日国际消除贫困日的中国系列博客文章的第一篇,中国对全球减贫事业的贡献超过世界任何国家,中国正在全力实现到2020年消除极端贫困的宏伟目标。
摄影:李文勇/世界银行
中国减贫成就举世瞩目。1982年,中国启动“三西”专项扶贫计划,拉开了有计划、有组织、大规模扶贫开发的序幕。1986年,成立国务院贫困地区经济开发领导小组(1993年改称国务院扶贫开发领导小组),认定贫困县,确定扶贫标准,设立财政专项扶贫资金。1994年颁布实施《国家八七扶贫攻坚计划(1994-2000年)》,2001年和2011年,先后两次颁布实施十年农村扶贫开发纲要。三十多年来,中国贫困人口大幅度减少,贫困地区和贫困人口的生产生活条件及公共服务水平明显改善。
 

Ending poverty in China: Lessons for other countries and the challenges still ahead

Chengwei Huang's picture
Also available in: 中文
This blog is the first piece of a series produced to commemorate End Poverty Day (October 17), focusing on China – which has contributed more than any other country to global poverty reduction – and its efforts to end extreme poverty by 2020.   
photo: Wenyong Li/World Bank
China’s success in poverty reduction has attracted worldwide attention. In 1982, China launched the “Sanxi Program” in the poorest regions in Gansu and Ningxia, marking the beginning of planned, organized and large-scale poverty alleviation efforts nationwide. In 1986, the government established the State Council Leading Group of Poverty Alleviation and Development, identified poor counties, set a national poverty line, and created special funds for poverty alleviation. In 1994, China launched the Seven-Year Priority Poverty Alleviation Program that was designed to lift 80 million people out of absolute poverty within seven years from 1994 to 2000. In 2001 and 2011, two ten-year poverty alleviation programs were launched to continue the war against poverty. During those three decades, the number of poor people fell sharply, and living conditions and access to public services improved markedly in the poorer regions.
 

Poverty is no barrier to one girl’s dream of becoming a doctor

Saroeun Bou's picture
Liza (center) with her classmate

Recently I met an inspiring student: 12-year-old Song Liza, who told me about her goal of becoming a doctor.

Her reasoning is simple: one, because the shortage of doctors in Cambodia means she would be able to get a good job; and two, because she wants to help people in her poor, remote community in this part of northeastern Cambodia.

Medical school is a long way off for Liza, but despite facing more challenges than many her age, she has laid out a series of goals that she knows she must achieve before she can put on that white coat.
 

Myanmar - Participating in change: Promoting public sector accountability to all

Shabih Ali Mohib's picture

Available in Myanmar





Successful development is about making a reality of aspirations and ambitious ideas through effective implementation – Myanmar can achieve just that for its people by instilling the values of transparency, accountability and public participation in its public sector.

 
Ideas and policies matter. They have the power to be transformative.  A strong and efficient, transparent and accountable public sector is crucial for translating inspiring ideas and policies into real development outcomes. If we liken Myanmar to a car, then the public sector – a collection of institutions, processes and people which together function as the machinery of government – has an important role to play. The people of Myanmar sit in the driver’s seat, the private sector is the engine which moves the economy forward – and the public sector acts as the car’s transmission and gearbox. If it’s running well, the car moves forward smoothly – but if it’s poorly maintained, people may be in for a bumpy ride. 
 

Thailand’s small school challenge and options for quality education

Dilaka Lathapipat's picture
Also available in: ภาษาไทย



Despite Thailand’s success in expanding educational access, new empirical evidence suggests that much more needs to be done to maximize the potential of its students. The 2012 PISA reading assessment reveals that almost one-third of Thai 15 year-old students were “functionally illiterate,” lacking critical skills needed for employment tasks that require reading skills beyond a basic level. Furthermore, the performance gap among schools has been widening in recent years. Unsurprisingly, the disadvantaged and poorer-performing students are concentrated in small rural village schools.

The logical next step toward gender equality: Generating evidence on what works

Sudhir Shetty's picture
© World Bank
College students in Vietnam. © World Bank


As in much of the rest of the developing world, developing countries in East Asia and the Pacific (EAP) have made progress in closing many gender disparities, particularly in areas such as education and health outcomes. Even on the gender gaps that still remain significant, more is now known about why these have remained “sticky” despite rapid economic progress. 

Ensuring that women and girls are on a level playing field with men and boys is both the right thing to do and the smart thing to do. It is right because gender equality is a core objective of development. And it is smart because gender equality can spur development. It has been estimated, for instance, that labor productivity in developing East Asia and Pacific could be 7-18% higher if women had equal access to productive resources and worked in the same sectors and types of jobs as men.

Papua New Guinea: Improving literacy in Bougainville, one step at a time

Tom Perry's picture
Students from Aravira Primary School in central Bougainville, Papua New Guinea on their walk to school - which for some, takes up to four hours
Students from Aravira Primary School in central Bougainville, Papua New Guinea on their walk to school - which for some, takes up to four hours 

After a two-hour drive from the nearest main road, our 4WD can travel no further; me and my travelling companions will have to trek the rest of our journey to Aravira Primary School in Bougainville on foot. As we set off, a group of students from the school emerge from the bush in front of us. They smile, extend their hands in welcome and immediately offer to take my backpack. 

I politely refuse, yet within minutes I regret my decision to turn down help. As we move through the long grass along the mountain ridge, the heat which a few minutes ago was manageable is now unbearable. I’m pouring in sweat. My backpack feels 10 kilograms heavier, and the ground beneath me feels as if I’m stepping onto ice. Ten minutes into our journey, I lose my feet, slip into a crevice, and land face-first in the nearest bush.

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