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transit-oriented development

Transit-oriented development and the case of the Marina Bay area in Singapore

Gerald Ollivier's picture


What do you love about the city you live in?
 
Your answer may be a combination of the following: ease of travel and access to many jobs using high quality and low cost public transit; livability as measured by the availability of green or community space such as parks, schools, cultural or shopping centers; ease of walking and biking encouraging active living and an engaging community; and an idea of what the city would look like ten years from now.

中国城市可以从新加坡借鉴哪些经验?

Wanli Fang's picture
Also available in: English
新加坡Marina海湾的再开发项目将河道的一部分改造成水库。摄影: 10 FACE/Shutterstock

上周,我有幸参加了新加坡城市周活动。一同参加本次活动的还有世行驻华代表处的其他同事以及来自中国政府和参与世行项目的城市代表。对我们参会者而言,此行可以说是开阔眼界,使我们更清晰地了解到综合性的城市规划方法对构建可持续城市所起的重要作用,并为我们提供了诸多可推广的经验。这些经验稍加调整后即可为实现不同城市自身发展的目标提供实用的解决方案。以下几点经验供大家参考:
 
发展战略以人为本
 
要做到这一点,需要城市规划人员时刻关注市民对城市空间的日常体验,并通过公众参与请市民在决策过程发挥作用。譬如,在许多城市,公共交通被视为一种低端且不具备吸引力的出行方式,即便在交通拥堵严重情况下,公交载客量增长也停滞不前。但在新加坡,2014年公共交通在各种出行方式中的占比高达三分之二。在该市,乘坐地铁出行不仅舒适而且高效,因为各种公交工具和线路之间的换乘很方便,有明确的标识指引系统,换乘站点之间建有配备空调的连接走廊,并且为老年乘客和行动不便的乘客配置了考虑周到的空间设计和服务设施。此外,地铁站与主要零售和商业设施以及其它公共服务设施融合在一起,从而大大减少了最后一公里的连接问题。
 

What can Chinese cities learn from Singapore?

Wanli Fang's picture
Also available in: 中文
One of Singapore’s latest redevelopment projects included the construction of a freshwater reservoir. Photo: 10 FACE/Shutterstock

Last week, I had the opportunity to attend the Singapore Urban Week along with other colleagues from the World Bank Beijing office, as well as delegates from China’s national government and participating cities. For all of us, this trip to Singapore was an eye-opening experience that highlighted the essential role of integrated urban planning in building sustainable cities, and provided practical solutions that can be readily adapted to help achieve each city’s own development vision. A couple of key lessons learned:

Putting people at the center of development strategies

This is only possible when planners always keep in mind people’s daily experience of urban space and invite them as part of decision-making process through citizen engagement.

For instance, in many cities, public transit has been perceived as a low-end, unattractive option of travel, causing ridership to stagnate despite severe traffic congestion. But in Singapore, public transit accounts for 2/3 of the total travel modal share in 2014. Moving around the city by metro is comfortable and efficient because transfers between different modes and lines are easy, with clear signage of directions, air-conditioned connecting corridors, and considerate spatial designs and facilities for the elderly and physically-challenged users. In addition, metro stations are co-located with major retail and commercial activities and other urban amenities, significantly reducing last-mile connectivity issues.