Syndicate content

Thailand

Five lessons in infrastructure pricing from East Asia and Pacific

Melania Lotti's picture
Photo: © Dini Sari Djalal/World Bank

In the infrastructure domain, “price” is a prism with many façades.
 
An infrastructure economist sees price in graphic terms: the coordinates of a point where demand and supply curves intersect.
 
For governments, price relates to budget lines, as part of public spending to develop infrastructure networks.
 
Utility managers view price as a decision: the amount to charge for each unit of service in order to recover the costs of production and (possibly) earn a profit.
 
But for most people, price comes with simple question: how much is the tariff I have to pay for the service, and can I afford it?

Untuk menggali potensi siswa, tuntut dan dukunglah guru

Michael Crawford's picture
Also available in: English

Di antara 29 negara dan ekonomi kawasan Asia Timur dan Pasifik, kita bisa menemukan beberapa sistem pendidikan paling sukses di dunia. Tujuh dari sepuluh pencetak rata-rata nilai tertinggi pada tes yang dapat dibandingkan secara internasional seperti PISA dan TIMSS berasal dari kawasan tersebut, di mana Jepang, Korea Selatan, Singapura, dan Hong Kong, Tiongkok secara konsisten selalu berada di antara yang terbaik.
 
Namun, yang lebih penting, kita juga menemukan bahwa kinerja yang hebat tidak terbatas pada sistem sekolah di negara-negara berpenghasilan tinggi kawasan ini. Sistem sekolah di negara berpenghasilan menengah seperti Vietnam dan Tiongkok (khususnya provinsi di Beijing, Shanghai, Jiangsu, dan Guangdong), meskipun memiliki PDB per kapita yang jauh lebih rendah, memiliki nilai lebih baik daripada rata-rata negara OECD. Terlebih lagi, nilai dari Tiongkok dan Vietnam menunjukkan bahwa kinerja siswa miskin tidak tertinggal. Siswa dari kuintil berpenghasilan terendah kedua memiliki skor lebih baik daripada rata-rata siswa OECD, bahkan peserta tes paling miskin pun mengungguli siswa dari beberapa negara makmur. Namun demikian, seperti ditunjukkan grafik di bawah, negara-negara lain di kawasan ini belum mencapai hasil yang sama.

To unlock student potential in East Asia Pacific, be demanding and supportive of teachers

Michael Crawford's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia

Among the 29 countries and economies of the East Asia and Pacific region, one finds some of the world’s most successful education systems. Seven out of the top 10 highest average scorers on internationally comparable tests such as PISA and TIMSS are from the region, with Japan, Republic of Korea, Singapore, and Hong Kong (China) consistently among the best. 

But, more significantly, one also finds that great performance is not limited to school systems in the region’s high-income countries. School systems in middle-income Vietnam and China (specifically the provinces of Beijing, Shanghai, Jiangsu, and Guangdong) score better than the average OECD country, despite having much lower GDP per capita. What is more, scores from both China and Vietnam show that poor students are not being left behind. Students from the second-lowest income quintile score better than the average OECD student, and even the very poorest test takers outscore students from some wealthy countries. As the graph below shows, however, other countries in the region have yet to achieve similar results.

ASEAN meeting explores ways of professionalizing public procurement to meet development challenges

Adu-Gyamfi Abunyewa's picture
Construction of a sky train in Bangkok, Thailand. Photo: Seksan Pipattanatikanunt/World Bank
In the past, procurement (purchasing) was not considered to be a specialist function but one of the numerous duties that administrators performed in their respective government departments. However, today it is acknowledged that procurement has become an extremely complex and crucial undertaking coupled with the need to ensure value for money in the use of public resources to enhance the living conditions of its citizens.

The responsibilities have radically changed from that of an administrative service function to a proactive and strategic one. Unfortunately, in most jurisdictions the procurement function is still not considered a specific profession and consequently, building procurement professional expertise to meet development challenges remains an unfinished agenda.

การคุ้มครองครัวเรือนยากจนไทยเมื่อเผชิญภาวะเศรษฐกิจที่ยากลำบาก

Philip O’Keefe's picture
Also available in: English
ชายสูงอายุนั่งรอรับยาที่โรงพยาบาลในประเทศไทย
  ภาพโดย: ตฤณ สุวรรณนภา 

ประเทศไทยเพิ่งประกาศโครงการช่วยเหลือทางสังคมเพื่อครัวเรือนที่ยากจน  โครงการนี้จะสามารถลดความยากจนอย่างมีนัยสำคัญ ซึ่งจะช่วยให้ประเทศไทยเข้าไปอยู่ในกลุ่มประเทศที่รายได้ปานกลางซึ่งมีโครงการ “ตาข่ายความปลอดภัยทางสังคม” ให้กับคนยากจนเช่นเดียวกับประเทศจีน มาเลเซีย บราซิล ตุรกี และฟิลิปปินส์.

Protecting Poor Thai Families from Economic Hardship

Philip O’Keefe's picture
Also available in: ภาษาไทย
An elderly man waits for medicine at a hospital counter in Thailand. Photo: Trinn Suwannapha/World Bank

Thailand recently announced that it will put into action a national social assistance program for poor families. Such a program can help reduce poverty significantly. It would also move Thailand into the growing ranks of middle-income countries, such as China, Malaysia, Brazil, Turkey and the Philippines, that provide the poor with a ‘safety net’.

A Greener Growth Path to Sustain Thailand’s Future

Ulrich Zachau's picture
Also available in: ภาษาไทย

Global experience shows that growing first and cleaning up later rarely works. Rather, it is in countries’ interest to prioritize green and clean growth. This also holds true for Thailand, a country with rich natural resources contributing significantly to its wealth.

According to World Bank data, annual natural resource depletion in Thailand accounted for 4.4 percent of Gross National Income in 2012, and it has been rising rapidly since 2002. The rate of depletion is comparable to other countries in the East Asia and Pacific region, but it is almost three times faster than the rate in the 1980s. 

Rapid natural resource depletion in Thailand is increasingly visible in reduced forest areas. Illegal logging and smuggling have led to a decline from 171 million rai of forested area in 1961 to 107.6 million rai in 2009. Coastal communities face erosion, ocean waste, and illegal, destructive fishing. The coasts are also increasingly vulnerable to storm surges and sea level rise, due to continued destruction of mangroves and coral reefs.

เส้นทางการเติบโตสีเขียวเพื่ออนาคตที่ยั่งยืนของประเทศไทย

Ulrich Zachau's picture
Also available in: English

ประสบการณ์จากประเทศทั่วโลก แสดงให้เห็นว่าการให้ความสำคัญ กับการเติบโตทางเศรษฐกิจก่อน แล้วค่อยแก้ไขเรื่องสิ่งแวดล้อมภายหลังนั้นอาจไม่สำเร็จ เมื่อเทียบกับประเทศที่ใส่ใจและให้ความสำคัญ กับเรื่องการเติบโตที่สะอาดและเป็นมิตรกับสิ่งแวดล้อม เช่นเดียวกับประเทศไทยซึ่งมีทรัพยากรธรรมชาติอุดมสมบูรณ์ ซึ่งเป็นฐานเศรษฐกิจและความมั่งคั่งของประเทศ 

จากข้อมูลของธนาคารโลกพบว่าเมื่อปี 2555 อัตราการลดลงของทรัพยากรธรรมชาติต่อปีของไทยนั้นอยู่ 4.4% จากรายได้ประชาชาติรวมของประเทศ และสูงกว่าปี 2545 อย่างมาก แม้ว่าอัตรานี้จะไม่แตกต่างจากประเทศอื่นๆ ในภูมิภาคเอเชียตะวันออกและแปซิฟิก แต่สำหรับประเทศไทยนั้นนับว่าเพิ่มขึ้นถึง 3 เท่าจากช่วงปี 2523-2533 

การสูญเสียพื้นที่ป่าเป็นตัวอย่างที่ทำให้เราเห็นการลดลงของทรัพยากรธรรมชาติไทยที่สูงขึ้นได้อย่างชัดเจน การตัดไม้เถื่อนและการลักลอบตัดไม้ส่งผลให้พื้นที่ป่าของไทยลดลงจาก 171 ล้านไร่ในปีพ.ศ. 2504 เหลือเพียง 107.6 ล้านไร่ในปี 2552 ชุมชนที่อาศัยอยู่ตามแนวชายฝั่งทะเลกำลังเผชิญกับภาวะกัดเซาะชายฝั่ง ขยะในทะเล และการลักลอบจับปลาแบบผิดกฎหมาย ชายฝั่งทะเลไทยเผชิญกับความเสี่ยงอันเกิดจากคลื่นพายุซัดชายฝั่งและน้ำทะเลสูงขึ้นอันเป็นผลจากการทำลายพื้นที่ป่าโกงกางและแนวปะการังอย่างต่อเนื่อง

Pages