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Untuk menggali potensi siswa, tuntut dan dukunglah guru

Michael Crawford's picture
Also available in: English

Di antara 29 negara dan ekonomi kawasan Asia Timur dan Pasifik, kita bisa menemukan beberapa sistem pendidikan paling sukses di dunia. Tujuh dari sepuluh pencetak rata-rata nilai tertinggi pada tes yang dapat dibandingkan secara internasional seperti PISA dan TIMSS berasal dari kawasan tersebut, di mana Jepang, Korea Selatan, Singapura, dan Hong Kong, Tiongkok secara konsisten selalu berada di antara yang terbaik.
Namun, yang lebih penting, kita juga menemukan bahwa kinerja yang hebat tidak terbatas pada sistem sekolah di negara-negara berpenghasilan tinggi kawasan ini. Sistem sekolah di negara berpenghasilan menengah seperti Vietnam dan Tiongkok (khususnya provinsi di Beijing, Shanghai, Jiangsu, dan Guangdong), meskipun memiliki PDB per kapita yang jauh lebih rendah, memiliki nilai lebih baik daripada rata-rata negara OECD. Terlebih lagi, nilai dari Tiongkok dan Vietnam menunjukkan bahwa kinerja siswa miskin tidak tertinggal. Siswa dari kuintil berpenghasilan terendah kedua memiliki skor lebih baik daripada rata-rata siswa OECD, bahkan peserta tes paling miskin pun mengungguli siswa dari beberapa negara makmur. Namun demikian, seperti ditunjukkan grafik di bawah, negara-negara lain di kawasan ini belum mencapai hasil yang sama.

To unlock student potential in East Asia Pacific, be demanding and supportive of teachers

Michael Crawford's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia

Among the 29 countries and economies of the East Asia and Pacific region, one finds some of the world’s most successful education systems. Seven out of the top 10 highest average scorers on internationally comparable tests such as PISA and TIMSS are from the region, with Japan, Republic of Korea, Singapore, and Hong Kong (China) consistently among the best. 

But, more significantly, one also finds that great performance is not limited to school systems in the region’s high-income countries. School systems in middle-income Vietnam and China (specifically the provinces of Beijing, Shanghai, Jiangsu, and Guangdong) score better than the average OECD country, despite having much lower GDP per capita. What is more, scores from both China and Vietnam show that poor students are not being left behind. Students from the second-lowest income quintile score better than the average OECD student, and even the very poorest test takers outscore students from some wealthy countries. As the graph below shows, however, other countries in the region have yet to achieve similar results.

តោះនិយាយ និងច្រៀងអំពីលុយ៖ យុទ្ធនាការថ្មី ជួយដល់មនុស្សជំនាន់ក្រោយរបស់កម្ពុជាឲ្យយល់ដឹងអំពីការគ្រប់គ្រងហិរញ្ញវត្ថុ

Ratchada Anantavrasilpa's picture
Also available in: English
ធនាគារពិភពលោកចាប់ដៃគូរជាមួយមជ្ឈមណ្ឌលព័ត៌មានស្រ្តីកម្ពុជា រៀបចំកម្មវិធីវិទ្យុ “តោះនិយាយពីលុយ” ដើម្បីជួយកសាងស្ថេរភាពហិរញ្ញវត្ថុនៅកម្ពុជា។
ការគ្រប់គ្រងហិរញ្ញវត្ថុដែលមានហានិភ័យក្នុងចំណោមប្រជាពលរដ្ឋកម្ពុជាជំនាន់ក្រោយសហសវត្សរ៍ បានរីករាលដាលកាន់តែខ្លាំងឡើងនៅក្នុងប្រទេស ជាពិសេស ក្នុងចំណោមក្រុមយុវជនអាយុចន្លោះពី ១៨ ដល់ ៣៥ឆ្នាំ។ ខណៈដែលពួកគេជាអតិថិជនដ៏សំខាន់សម្រាប់វិស័យហិរញ្ញវត្ថុនិងធនាគារ អាកប្បកិរិយារបស់ពួកគេ ជាញឹកញយ ត្រូវបានឃុំគ្រងដោយការចាយវាយខ្ជះខ្ជាយ និងការខ្ចីលុយគេច្រើនហួសកំណត់។

Let’s talk money: New campaign helps Cambodia’s new generation on financial management

Ratchada Anantavrasilpa's picture
Also available in: Cambodian
The World Bank partnered with the Women’s Media Center “Let’s Talk Money” radio show to help build financial stability in Cambodia.
Risky financial behaviors among Cambodians of the post-millennial generation have become more widespread in the country, especially among the 18-35 age group. While they are important customers for the financial and banking sectors, their behaviors are often dominated by lavish spending and excessive borrowing. 

Cows and Television: Rolling out a New System for Financial Management Information in Cambodia

Saroeun Bou's picture

On a recent visit to provincial treasury offices to learn about the Financial Management Information Systems, or FMIS, that members of our Governance teams helped introduce, the conversation turned to cows.

Staff compared switching from manual pen-and-paper to an automated state-of-the-art public finance management system as akin to making a cow watch television. Cows, they explained, are as unfamiliar with television as some treasury staff are with computers, the internet, and FMIS.

Fortunately, the relevance of the analogy was short-lived. Treasury staff have overcome the learning curve and the new system has proven to be helpful. I consistently heard praise about the system’s usefulness because it provides useful financial information, reduces the amount of repetitive work, and generates timely reports. That is a big change.

How do we achieve sustained growth? Through human capital, and East Asia and the Pacific proves it

Michael Crawford's picture
Students at Beijing Bayi High School in China. Photo: World Bank

In 1950, the average working-age person in the world had  almost three years of education, but in East Asia and Pacific (EAP), the  average person had less than half that amount. Around this time, countries in  the EAP  region put themselves on a path that focused on growth  driven by human capital. They made significant and steady investments in  schooling to close the educational attainment gap with the rest of the world. While  improving their school systems, they also put their human capital to work in  labor markets. As a result, economic growth has been stellar: for four decades  EAP has grown at roughly twice the pace of the global average. What is more, no  slowdown is in sight for rising prosperity.

High economic growth and strong human capital accumulation  are deeply intertwined. In a recent paper, Daron Acemoglu and David Autor explore  the way skills and labor markets interact: Human capital is the central  determinant of economic growth and is the main—and very likely the only—means  to achieve shared growth when technology is changing quickly and raising the  demand for skills. Skills promote productivity and growth, but if there are not  enough skilled workers, growth soon chokes off. If, by contrast, skills are abundant and  average skill-levels keep rising, technological change can drive productivity  and growth without stoking inequality.

Universal Health Coverage day: Celebrating 15 years of health partnerships and innovations in Cambodia

Somil Nagpal's picture

For many of us who work in the health sector in Cambodia, the Universal Health Coverage Day in 2016 celebrates the beginning of a new journey. The recent launch of the Health Equity and Quality Improvement Project marked the beginning of a new phase in our journey to make Cambodia healthier and happier.

Poverty is no barrier to one girl’s dream of becoming a doctor

Saroeun Bou's picture
Liza (center) with her classmate

Recently I met an inspiring student: 12-year-old Song Liza, who told me about her goal of becoming a doctor.

Her reasoning is simple: one, because the shortage of doctors in Cambodia means she would be able to get a good job; and two, because she wants to help people in her poor, remote community in this part of northeastern Cambodia.

Medical school is a long way off for Liza, but despite facing more challenges than many her age, she has laid out a series of goals that she knows she must achieve before she can put on that white coat.

The logical next step toward gender equality: Generating evidence on what works

Sudhir Shetty's picture
© World Bank
College students in Vietnam. © World Bank

As in much of the rest of the developing world, developing countries in East Asia and the Pacific (EAP) have made progress in closing many gender disparities, particularly in areas such as education and health outcomes. Even on the gender gaps that still remain significant, more is now known about why these have remained “sticky” despite rapid economic progress. 

Ensuring that women and girls are on a level playing field with men and boys is both the right thing to do and the smart thing to do. It is right because gender equality is a core objective of development. And it is smart because gender equality can spur development. It has been estimated, for instance, that labor productivity in developing East Asia and Pacific could be 7-18% higher if women had equal access to productive resources and worked in the same sectors and types of jobs as men.

ឥឡូវកម្ពុជាគឺជាប្រទេសដែលសេដ្ឋកិច្ចមានចំណូលមធ្យមកម្រិតទាប៖ តើមានន័យយ៉ាងណា?

Sodeth Ly's picture
Also available in: English
កំណើនសេដ្ឋកិច្ចរយ:ពេលពីរទសវត្សបានជួយកម្ពុជាឲ្យក្លាយជាប្រទេសឈានមុខក្នុងការកាត់បន្ថយភាពក្រីក្រ។ ជោគជ័យលើទិដ្ឋភាពនេះមានន័យថាប្រជាជាតិអាស៊ីអគ្នេយ៍មួយនេះបានជំនះសង្គ្រាមស៊ីវិលដ៏អាក្រក់ ហើយឥឡូវត្រូវបានក្រុមធនាគារពិភពលោក (WBG)​ ចាត់ថ្នាក់ថាជាប្រទេសដែលមានចំណូលមធ្យមកម្រិតទាប។
ប្រព័ន្ធចាត់ថ្នាក់ថ្មីឆ្នាំនេះមានមូលដ្ឋានផ្អែកលើកម្រិតគោលដែល​ WBG បង្កើតឡើងក្នុងប្រព័ន្ធមួយមានប្រភពនៅក្នុងឯកសារឆ្នាំ1989 របស់ខ្លួន ដែលគូសបញ្ជាក់វីធីសាស្រ្តនេះ។​  តារាងខាងក្រោមបង្ហាញកម្រិតផ្សេងគ្នានៃការចាត់ថ្នាក់ផ្អែកលើចំណូលជាតិដុល (GNI):

កម្រិតគោល GNI កក្កដា 2016
ចំណូលទាប <$1,025
ចំណូលមធ្យមកម្រិតទាប $1,026 - $4,035
ចំណូលមធ្យមកម្រិតខ្ពស់ $4,036 - $12,475
ចំណូលខ្ពស់ > $12,476