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Tackling the Learning Crisis: What if Everyone Would Simply Do Their Job?

Jaime Saavedra's picture
Also available in: Français | Español
Investing more in human capital, that is, investing more in people, is critical for development. This sounds almost cliché by now, which to a certain extent is a tragedy. And it is a tragedy because while it is true, many governments and societies are not acting upon it.

If you are ill and you don’t know about it, it is a bad thing. If you know about it and you don’t do anything about it, it is a tragedy. When it comes to education in developing countries, we know we are ill and yet we are doing little about it.

Education: 5 Events to Follow During Spring Meetings 2018

Karolina Ordon Mazurkiewicz's picture


Each year the World Bank Group and the International Monetary Fund Spring Meetings provide an opportunity for country delegates, global thought leaders and development experts to engage in discussions on key development issues, including education. As in previous years, we invite you to connect, engage and watch education-related events, to gain first-hand knowledge of the latest thinking and developments in the field. By following our online channels, you will be able to directly participate in the various conversations, and virtually interact with our speakers and experts who will answer your questions.

From April 16th through April 22nd, the World Bank Education Team will be live tweeting from the Spring Meetings via our Twitter channel WBG_Education. Please follow us, like and interact with our content, and encourage others to follow our social media coverage by retweeting us!  

On International Women’s Day, I’m Celebrating the Power of Educating Girls

Oni Lusk-Stover's picture
In May 2016, I visited a refugeed camp in northern Iraq, where together with colleagues, I toured an NGO-run school that offers children a chance to be in safe space where learning and thinking about their hopes and dreams is possible. A young woman followed us around the school throughout the tour, watching us and listening intently to our conversations. After building up the courage, she approached me to ask about my visit, my family and what it was like to live in the United States. In turn, she told me about her family, her favorite subject in school (English) and how she wants to become a doctor when she grows up.

 

Facing Forward: Schooling for Learning in Africa

Elizabeth Ninan Dulvy's picture
Also available in: Français
The facts relating to learning outcomes in many countries in the Africa region are depressing and the challenges are immense. But there is a growing body of new evidence from countries across Africa that points to lessons that can be learned about what has worked to improve learning. Together with my co-authors, Sajitha Bashir, Marlaine Lockheed, Jee-Peng Tan and many other contributors, the World Bank has just released a book entitled “Facing Forward: Schooling for Learning in Africa” that focuses on how to improve learning outcomes in basic education —i.e six years of primary and three years of lower secondary education. 
 

Uniquely Human: The Centrality of Humanism in the Future Workforce

Thomas Michael Kaye's picture

My nephew Reuben was born on December 9, 2017. Reuben is a member of generation Alpha, a cohort that is younger than smartphones, cryptocurrency, and synthetic human cells. Reuben was born in Australia only a few short months after Sophia became the first robot citizen of Saudi Arabia. Reuben will take his first steps in a pair of self-tying shoes to walk into a world of self-driving (maybe even flying!?) cars, digital assistants, and augmented reality. Yet, this is only the beginning. Reuben will encounter an exponential rate of change that will continue until approximately 2101.

Measuring Early Childhood Development: A Toolkit for Doing it Right

Daphna Berman's picture




















The early years are a critical period for development of children’s brains and bodies and the cognitive, linguistic, socio-emotional, and motor skills they need to thrive in school and succeed later in life. Too often, poverty and its associated problems, such as poor health services, weak education systems and lack of parental knowledge, limit the support, care, and stimulation that children require for healthy development.

Early childhood programs are aimed at helping children get what they need to reach their potential. Designing and evaluating the impact of programs requires first understanding how to measure and track children’s development. This is the challenge. Measuring early childhood development in low- and middle-income countries requires trade-offs and choices that can be difficult to manage for even the most experienced researchers. A new toolkit released by the World Bank’s Strategic Impact Evaluation Fund aims to help researchers and development practitioners understand how to assess early childhood development accurately and reliably.

Schools are teaching 10 million girls to code; gender equality is a real possibility

Hadi Partovi's picture
Also available in: Français 
Editor's note: This is a guest blog by Hadi Partovi, tech entrepreneur and investor, and CEO of the education non-profit Code.org.
In the last few years, schools globally have made real strides towards gender equality in computer science.
In the last few years, schools globally have made real strides towards gender equality in computer science.  (Photo: Code.org)


Today, for the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, we celebrate the progress made towards reducing the gender gap in computer science, and we urge schools worldwide to help balance the scales in this critical 21st century subject.
 

Latin America: Is better technical and technological higher education the answer?

Diego Angel-Urdinola's picture
Also available in: Español
 
A new World Bank study finds that some Chilean technicians with a two-year degree have education returns that are only slightly lower than those of professionals. (Photo: Dominic Chavez/World Bank)



Two years ago, 23-year-old Pedro Flores became a technician specializing in renewable energy—all thanks to a degree from a technical institute in Maule, located in one of Chile’s poorest regions. After completing his degree in just two years, Flores became the only person in his family to obtain an advanced degree. Today, he lives in Santiago and works for a private solar energy multinational corporation, where he earns a competitive salary that is only slightly below the average for entry-level professionals in his field, most of whom spent over five years in university.

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