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October 2013

Inspired by Malala: Raising Girls’ Voices

Carolyn Reynolds's picture


Wow.  I’ve been fortunate to be involved in many impactful events during my years at the World Bank, but one of the most memorable will always be the conversation between 16 year-old girls’ education advocate Malala Yousafzai and World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim during our Annual Meetings last Friday, in honor of the International Day of the Girl Child.

Five Steps to Improve Girls’ Education and Job Prospects

Mattias Lundberg's picture


What comes first to your mind when you think about girls’ education? There may be a good chance that you remember a particular girl you met who could not go to primary school. Or perhaps you will visualize one of those great pictures of smiling and studious girls attending primary school in a developing country thanks to a particular project or intervention.
 
Both pictures are correct, but they account for only a small part of the story. 

The Hidden Cost of Corruption: Teacher Absenteeism and Loss in Schools

Harry A. Patrinos's picture
Also available in: Français


Today, Transparency International releases The Global Corruption Report: Education, and its message is clear:  When there is corruption in education, the poor and disadvantaged suffer most.  Education is critical if we are to meet the goal of ending poverty and boosting shared prosperity by 2030. Corruption undermines the equally critical goal of ensuring that all children and youth go to school and learn.

While corruption hampers all development efforts, it is a debilitating presence in the education sector.  In my contribution to the report, I highlight the damage from corruption in one of the most important aspects of education, teacher absenteeism.