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August 2014

Global Education Targets: Are They Missing the Point?

Ariel Fiszbein's picture



Since the early 1960s (at the conference of Addis Ababa), and with the best intentions, the international community has been setting goals to solve educational problems in developing countries. Unfortunately, and for various reasons, these have not been met. Even the most recently agreed targets in the Millennium Development Goals, which should be achieved next year, will not be met. In fact, 54 countries will not have achieved universal primary education by the end of 2015.

Generating Evidence to Improve Learning

Chris Berry's picture
Photo: Arne Hoel/ World Bank

Very soon, tens of millions of children around the world will start a new school year.  It’s supposed to be the time for children to acquire the skills and knowledge they need to succeed in life.  Are they getting that education in school?  Not always.  Nearly 25 percent of primary school-age children around the world can’t read, write or do basic mathematics.  About one-quarter of these children have never had the chance to learn because they aren’t in school.  Making sure that children learn – in other words, giving children the tools needed so they can reach their potential – is a global priority.  Success requires understanding the most effective way to do this.  That’s where evidence matters.