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How do School Vouchers Help Improve Education Systems?

Harry A. Patrinos's picture

This is an excerpt from "School Vouchers Can Help Improve Education Systems" published on the Opinions section of the World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE) website.


As the demand for education increases, resources remain scarce. In most countries, the government is both the major financier as well as the provider of education. However, schooling still does not reach all members of society equally.

One way of financing education is to provide families with the funding – via cash transfers to schools based on enrollments or by providing cash to families to purchase schooling – in other words- through vouchers. The objective of a voucher program is to extend the financial support from the government to these other education providers and thus give all parents, regardless of income, the opportunity to choose the school that best suits their preferences.

Indigenous Peoples: The Issue of Poverty and the Importance of Good Policy

Harry A. Patrinos's picture

Indigenous Peoples make up 4 percent of the world’s population yet account for over 10 percent of the world’s poor. The Development Community cannot afford to ignore Indigenous Peoples if it aims to achieve the international development goals.

In our recent book, Indigenous Peoples, Poverty and Development (edited by Gillette Hall and Harry A. Patrinos), several issues threatening indigenous peoples today, are highlighted. The book provides a study of Indigenous Peoples and ethnic minorities (and scheduled tribes) for most of the countries with the largest indigenous/ethnic minority populations, namely India and China, along with three countries in Africa (Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon), Lao PDR and Vietnam, and has updates from six Latin American countries, which we had analyzed in our earlier work on Indigenous Peoples, Poverty and Human Development in Latin America: 1994-2004.

Voices from Former African Ministers of Education on the Challenges of Workforce Development

With contributions from:
-Haja N. Razafinjatovo, Former Minister of Finance and of Education,Madagascar
-Mamadou Ndoye, Former Minister of Education, Senegal
-Dzingai Mutumbuka, Former Minister of Education, Zimbabwe
-Birger Fredriksen, Former Sector Director for Human Development, World Bank, Africa Region

Several former African Ministers of Education attended Workforce Development: What Matters? at the World Bank. The event is part of the System Approach for Better Education Results, Workforce Development initiative (SABER WfD). Below are key takeaway messages from these former ministers regarding the initiative and the challenges of workforce development, particularly in Africa.  
 
WfD is a recognized global challenge. Countries at all levels of development are struggling to address the dual challenge of producing the skills required to achieve sustained economic growth in a rapidly changing global economy, and generating employment both for young people joining the labor force and for workers in declining industries.

eBay Scholarships and Engineering for Kindergarteners: New Paths toward Tertiary Education

Jamil Salmi's picture

As I was bidding farewell to the World Bank earlier this year, I received an invitation from Green Templeton College, Oxford University, to attend the Emerging Markets Symposium – an initiative that convenes leaders from government, academia and the private sector to address the major policy challenges facing emerging market countries.

Education in Europe and Central Asia (ECA) region: Investing Early, Smartly and for All

Alberto Rodriguez's picture

The World Bank’s new Education Strategy, Learning for All, invites us to invest early, invest smartly, and invest for all. It proposes fostering a comprehensive view of education – a systems approach strengthened by a knowledge base on what works to improve education systems that can be shared amongst the global community.

Waiting for Superman in Mexico

Harry A. Patrinos's picture

In the award-winning documentary, Waiting for Superman, alternatives to the traditional public school system are explored and debated. Following this tradition, the civil society group Mexicanos Primero recently released the documentary ¡De Panzazo! (‘barely passing’), directed by journalist Carlos Loret de Mola and documentary filmmaker Juan Carlos Rulfo.

Interview: A “Bright Horizon” for Girls’ Education

The Bank’s education team recently hosted a one-day colloquium, “Getting to Equal in Education,” to address how girls worldwide can achieve the full benefits of a quality education and as a result lead healthy, productive lives that benefit their families, their communities, and their nations.

Education—An Integral Piece of the Gender Puzzle

Jeni Klugman's picture

I was delighted to join the recent colloquium, Getting to Equal in Education: Addressing Gender and Multiple Sources of Disadvantage to Achieve Learning.  It was a great initiative, with a whole range of experts and advocates in the room, ranging from old hands to much young blood!

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