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Potenciar las habilidades socioemocionales de los estudiantes en México

Pablo Peña's picture
Also available in: English
El número y el alcance de las intervenciones destinadas a promover las habilidades socioemocionales continúan aumentando. Foto: Curt Carnemark / World Bank

Las habilidades socioemocionales (también llamadas habilidades no cognitivas, del carácter o interpersonales) han ocupado recientemente el centro del debate (PDF, en inglés) sobre cómo mejorar los resultados educativos. Cada vez hay más pruebas (PDF, en inglés) de que estas habilidades son tan importantes como la inteligencia para determinar el éxito académico y profesional. Existen algunas evidencias que indican que las habilidades socioemocionales pueden potenciarse.

Fostering Student Socioemotional Skills in Mexico

Pablo Peña's picture
Also available in: Español
Interventions aimed at fostering socioemotional skills continue to grow in number and scope. However, many questions remain about the extent to which these skills are malleable and exactly how they can be cultivated. Photo: Curt Carnemark / World Bank

Socioemotional skills (also referred to as non-cognitive skills, character skills, or soft skills) have recently become part of the discourse on how to improve educational outcomes. There is growing evidence that those skills may be as important as intelligence in determining academic and professional success. There is already some evidence indicating that socioemotional skills can be encouraged.

비인지능력의 정의와 중요성

Raja Bentaouet Kattan's picture
Also available in: English | Español | Français
 Trinn Suwannapha / World Bank)
자동화 등의 추세로 인해 노동 시장이 근본적인 변화를 거치면서 비인지 능력과 사회정서적 능력의 중요성에 대한 연구가 활발해지고 있다. (사진: Trinn Suwannapha / 세계은행)

지난 수십 년 동안 동아시아 국가를 포함한 많은 국가에서 저렴한 저숙련 노동력은 경쟁력의 원천이었다. 그러나 자동화가 진행되면서 값싼 인력과 낮은 기술은 더는 경제 성장이나 일자리를 보장할 수 없게 되었다.
 

Latin America: Is better technical and technological higher education the answer?

Diego Angel-Urdinola's picture
Also available in: Español
 
A new World Bank study finds that some Chilean technicians with a two-year degree have education returns that are only slightly lower than those of professionals. (Photo: Dominic Chavez/World Bank)



Two years ago, 23-year-old Pedro Flores became a technician specializing in renewable energy—all thanks to a degree from a technical institute in Maule, located in one of Chile’s poorest regions. After completing his degree in just two years, Flores became the only person in his family to obtain an advanced degree. Today, he lives in Santiago and works for a private solar energy multinational corporation, where he earns a competitive salary that is only slightly below the average for entry-level professionals in his field, most of whom spent over five years in university.

Aptitudes no cognitivas: qué son y por qué deberían importarnos

Raja Bentaouet Kattan's picture
Also available in: English | Français | 한국어
 Trinn Suwannapha / World Bank)
Tendencias como la automatización, que provocan cambios fundamentales en el mercado laboral, hacen que las investigaciones analicen cada vez más el valor de las aptitudes no cognitivas o las habilidades socioemocionales. (Foto: Trinn Suwannapha/Banco Mundial)
En las últimas décadas, la mano de obra barata y poco calificada ha proporcionado a muchos países, incluida gran parte de Asia oriental, una ventaja competitiva. Sin embargo, la cada vez mayor automatización que afecta a las economías hace que la mano de obra barata y los bajos niveles de capacitación ya no garanticen el crecimiento económico ni el empleo. 

Non-cognitive skills: What are they and why should we care?

Raja Bentaouet Kattan's picture
Also available in: Español | Français | 한국어
 Trinn Suwannapha / World Bank)
With trends such as automation causing fundamental shifts in the labor market, research is increasingly looking at the value of non-cognitive skills or socioemotional skills. (Photo: Trinn Suwannapha / World Bank)


Over the past few decades, cheap and low-skilled labor has provided many countries — including much of East Asia — with a competitive advantage.  However, with economies increasingly turning to automation, cheap labor and low skills will no longer guarantee economic growth or even jobs. 

Age bias in testing is real, and we must do something about it

Pablo Peña's picture
 Maria Fleischmann / World Bank
When test scores are used to make important decisions, age-related differences scores may have life-changing consequences. (Photo: Maria Fleischmann / World Bank)


The inefficiency and inequity caused by age differences in testing is not news. On the contrary, it is a well-documented fact. The proposed solution to this problem is to age-adjust test scores. But the truth is, we are nowhere near to implementing such a solution.

Education and economic development: Five reforms that have worked

Harry A. Patrinos's picture
También disponible en: Español | Français
Education systems are simply not performing as needed; not as economies demand, and not as parents desire. Yet it’s important to celebrate and recognize the success of countries that have made significant advances. (Photo: Sofie Tesson / Taimani Films / World Bank)

Every sector is reforming to meet the changing demands of the global economy. Except one. Education remains a predominantly public service.  This is fine except that it means that this is also mainly publicly-provided, publicly-financed, and regulated. No public service agency is expected to do as much as we expect of education. How are education systems around the world faring?

Bootcamps: Raising expectations for girls in math, science and technology

Juliana Guaqueta Ospina's picture
Also available in: Español
A Laboratoria classroom in Peru
Laboratoria, a nonprofit organization that runs six-month courses, targets girls from low-income families who face major barriers to accessing higher education. (Photo: Laboratoria)


Intensive “bootcamp” training programs that develop coding and other computer science skills and directly connect students with jobs are becoming increasingly popular. In the U.S, there are already over 90 bootcamps—and they are taking root in Latin America too, helping to close the region’s skills and gender gaps.

“Bootcamps”: aumentan las expectativas de las niñas en los campos de matemáticas, ciencia y tecnología

Juliana Guaqueta Ospina's picture
Also available in: English
A Laboratoria classroom in Peru
Laboratoria, organización sin fines de lucro que dirige cursos de seis meses para niñas de familias de bajos ingresos que enfrentan barreras para acceder a la educación superior. Foto: Laboratoria

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