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Latin America & Caribbean

International Women’s Day 2017: Empowering girls and women through education

Oni Lusk-Stover's picture
An analysis of women aged 25 to 34 underlines the relevance of the International Women’s Day 2017 theme, #BeBoldForChange. (Photo: John Isaac / World Bank)
 


Parents love their children.
Farming is hard work.
The child is reading a book.
Children work hard at school.

These are the sentences that women ages 25-34— who reported their highest level of education as being primary school or less — were asked to read as part of the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) Woman’s Questionnaire.

Bootcamps: Raising expectations for girls in math, science and technology

Juliana Guaqueta Ospina's picture
Also available in: Español
A Laboratoria classroom in Peru
Laboratoria, a nonprofit organization that runs six-month courses, targets girls from low-income families who face major barriers to accessing higher education. (Photo: Laboratoria)


Intensive “bootcamp” training programs that develop coding and other computer science skills and directly connect students with jobs are becoming increasingly popular. In the U.S, there are already over 90 bootcamps—and they are taking root in Latin America too, helping to close the region’s skills and gender gaps.

“Bootcamps”: aumentan las expectativas de las niñas en los campos de matemáticas, ciencia y tecnología

Juliana Guaqueta Ospina's picture
Also available in: English
A Laboratoria classroom in Peru
Laboratoria, organización sin fines de lucro que dirige cursos de seis meses para niñas de familias de bajos ingresos que enfrentan barreras para acceder a la educación superior. Foto: Laboratoria

The Central Matter: An artistic analysis of Central America's Nini subculture

Rafael de Hoyos's picture
Also available in: Español


On her daily walk down the muddy road that connects her home with school, Beatriz would sing a cumbia and dream of becoming a professional dancer. However, she would soon find out that her aspirations were short lived. At the age of 14, Beatriz got pregnant and never went back to school. In the six years following her pregnancy, she struggled with an unstable and low-paid job, cleaning rich houses in Guatemala City. By the age of 20, without minimum skills and a secure job, Beatriz had little control over her life and a murky picture of her future loomed. 

Exposición “The Central Matter”: un análisis artístico de la subcultura de los ninis en América Central

Rafael de Hoyos's picture
Also available in: English


En su caminata diaria por el camino lleno de lodo que conecta su casa con la escuela, Beatriz canta una cumbia y sueña con ser una bailarina profesional. Sin embargo, pronto descubrirá que sus aspiraciones durarán poco. A los 14 años, Beatriz quedará embarazada y nunca más volverá a la escuela. En los seis años posteriores a su embarazo, tendrá que lidiar con un trabajo inestable y mal pagado, limpiando casas de personas ricas en la ciudad de Guatemala. A los 20 años, sin contar con las habilidades mínimas y un trabajo seguro, Beatriz tendrá poco control de su vida y su futuro no será muy halagüeño.

The latest PISA results: Seven key takeaways

Marguerite Clarke's picture
International assessments aren’t perfect but they offer useful insights into how countries can help all students learn to high levels. (Photo: Dominic Chavez / World Bank)


Results for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) 2015 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) exercise were released on December 6. The results are instructive, not only because of what they tell us about the science, mathematics, and reading knowledge and skills of 15-year-olds around the world, but also in terms of how they compare to the 2015 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) results, which were released a week ago (click here to read my blog on key takeaways from the TIMSS results).

PBS Documentary follows students around the world for 12 years as they fight to get basic education

Nina Chaudry's picture
 2003 – 2016


The idea for this 12-year documentary project, Time for School, came after Pamela Hogan (our producer) read an op-ed in which economist Amartya Sen argued that investing in education was key to promoting a country’s economic and social growth.

Brazil: Extending school days may hurt students

Rita Almeida's picture
Photo: Stephan Bachenheimer/ World Bank

María is a single mother with two young children who spend about five hours a day in school. Since she has a full time job, it’s a challenge for her to care for them and not lose her only source of income. This may be a hypothetical situation but it’s replicated, every day, in many countries in Latin America that have a reduced school day. 
In Latin America, several countries – Chile, Colombia, Uruguay, and Brazil – have introduced programs to lengthen the school day. The goal: to improve student learning, reduce student dropouts, and to ultimately shrink income inequality.

There is no easy fix to the dropout problem

Rafael de Hoyos's picture
This page in: Espanol
Students at secondary school. Photo: © Charlotte Kesl / World Bank


When I joined the Mexican ministry of education in 2008, one of the first challenges I had was to identify effective policies to reduce dropout rates in upper secondary (grades 10, 11 and 12). Eight years, two randomized control trials, numerous workshops, and several diagnostics later, I still don’t have a precise answer. 

Online education’s potential in Latin America starting to be tapped

Juliana Guaqueta Ospina's picture
Law student at Catholic University of Peru, Jean Franco Gutierrez Quevedo studies at the library in Lima, Peru on June 27, 2013. Photo © World Bank/Dominic Chavez

Four years ago, while sitting on a plane heading for a business development trip to Asia, a colleague asked me if I had heard of a new course from Stanford University in which more than 100,000 students enrolled after it was put online. A nascent company called Coursera was behind the initiative, he told me. My interest piqued, I contacted Coursera founders Andrew Ng and Daphne Koller. A few short months later, the IFC decided to invest, the start of a relationship that continues to blossom.

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