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Latin America & Caribbean

Brazil: Extending school days may hurt students

Rita Almeida's picture
Photo: Stephan Bachenheimer/ World Bank

María is a single mother with two young children who spend about five hours a day in school. Since she has a full time job, it’s a challenge for her to care for them and not lose her only source of income. This may be a hypothetical situation but it’s replicated, every day, in many countries in Latin America that have a reduced school day. 
In Latin America, several countries – Chile, Colombia, Uruguay, and Brazil – have introduced programs to lengthen the school day. The goal: to improve student learning, reduce student dropouts, and to ultimately shrink income inequality.

There is no easy fix to the dropout problem

Rafael de Hoyos's picture
This page in: Espanol
Students at secondary school. Photo: © Charlotte Kesl / World Bank


When I joined the Mexican ministry of education in 2008, one of the first challenges I had was to identify effective policies to reduce dropout rates in upper secondary (grades 10, 11 and 12). Eight years, two randomized control trials, numerous workshops, and several diagnostics later, I still don’t have a precise answer. 

Online education’s potential in Latin America starting to be tapped

Juliana Guaqueta Ospina's picture
Law student at Catholic University of Peru, Jean Franco Gutierrez Quevedo studies at the library in Lima, Peru on June 27, 2013. Photo © World Bank/Dominic Chavez

Four years ago, while sitting on a plane heading for a business development trip to Asia, a colleague asked me if I had heard of a new course from Stanford University in which more than 100,000 students enrolled after it was put online. A nascent company called Coursera was behind the initiative, he told me. My interest piqued, I contacted Coursera founders Andrew Ng and Daphne Koller. A few short months later, the IFC decided to invest, the start of a relationship that continues to blossom.

School nutrition programs are the first line of defense against diabetes

Linda Brooke Schultz's picture
Children having meals in school in Ghana. Photo: © Arne Hoel/The World Bank



April 7th is World Health Day, a day to highlight emerging global health concerns. The focus this year is raising awareness on the diabetes epidemic, and its dramatic increase in low- and middle-income countries.

¿Por qué se ha estancado el nivel de aprendizaje en Argentina?

Peter Holland's picture
Also available in: English

[Estancamiento en el nivel de aprendizaje: stagˈlərniNG/ sustantivo
Un crecimiento nulo en los resultados básicos de aprendizaje, pese a los altos niveles de gasto en educación.]

Argentina no es ajena a la estanflación, es decir un estancamiento del crecimiento económico, a pesar de una alta inflación. Pero durante aproximadamente la última década, además ha sufrido de estancamiento en el nivel de aprendizaje, o sea un crecimiento nulo en el aprendizaje, pese a los elevados niveles de gasto en educación. Esto no es solo ineficiente sino también doloroso, ya que significa que el país no está aprovechando la posible oportunidad de reducir la pobreza.

Why is Argentina suffering from StagLearning?

Peter Holland's picture
Also available in: Español
Students in Argentina's rural communities

[StagLearning:stagˈlərniNG/ noun
A condition of no growth in basic learning outcomes, despite high levels of education spending.]
 
Argentina is no stranger to stagflation – a condition of stagnant economic growth, despite high inflation.  But, over the last decade or so, it has also been suffering from staglearning – no growth in learning, despite high levels of spending on education. This is not just inefficient; this is heartbreaking since it means the country is not capitalizing on potential poverty reduction.

The “nini” youth of Latin America: Out of school, out of work, and misunderstood

Halsey Rogers's picture
Also available in: Español | Portuguese, International


The popular image of the out-of-school, out-of-work youth of Latin America is not generally a positive one.  For one thing, the term used to label them – “ninis” – defines them in the negative.  It comes fromni estudian ni trabajan”, the Spanish phrase for those who "neither study nor work.” 
 

Los “ninis” de América Latina: ni estudian ni trabajan ni son comprendidos

Halsey Rogers's picture
Also available in: English | Portuguese, International


La imagen popular de la juventud de América Latina que no estudia ni trabaja no es positiva. Por un lado, el término usado para etiquetarlos –“ninis”– los define en  negativo. Proviene de la frase en español “ni estudian ni trabajan”.
 

Myth-busting: What happens when you link payments to results in education projects

Peter Holland's picture
Young children work on their activity sheets at a school in Jamaica. (Photo: Christina Wright / World Bank)


After getting off to a slower start than our colleagues in health, results-based financing (RBF) is gaining much momentum in education.

Learning about learning assessments

Andreas Schleicher's picture
High school students in Latin America review their notes.  Photo: © Charlotte Kesl / World Bank


How do large-scale student assessments, like PISA, actually work? What are the key ingredients that are necessary to produce a reliable, policy relevant assessment of what children and young people know and can do with what they know? A new report commissioned by the OECD and the World Bank offers a behind-the-scenes look at how some of the largest of these assessments are developed and implemented, particularly in developing countries. 

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