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Early childhood development (ECD)

Early childhood education in Mongolia – who is still excluded?

Rabia Ali's picture
Mongolian 
 
Mother and son in front of their family ger. (Photo: Khasar Sandag / World Bank)


International Children’s Day is celebrated in Mongolia as an official holiday. I could see that it provided an opportunity to reflect on the country’s commitment to create opportunities for its children to thrive and realize their full potential in school and adult life. Nowhere is this commitment more evident than in the education sector. With near-universal access to basic education achieved, legislation and government policy now calls for the expansion of early childhood education (ECE) services to cover every child in the country.

In Africa, changing norms and advocating for investments in the early years

Noreyana Fernando's picture
A conversation with Dr. Ibrahima Giroux, Senegal’s Early Years Fellow
 
Photo © Dominic Chavez/World Bank
The demand for expertise in the area of early childhood development is increasing in Africa. But this demand is not being met. (Photo: Dominic Chavez/World Bank)


The first few years of a child’s life have proven to be an ideal window of opportunity to break the cycle of poverty. Yet across the world, nearly half of all three to six-year-olds do not have access to pre-primary education.

Investing in parents for a more productive and inclusive Brazil

Rita Almeida's picture
Also available in: Portuguese, International
Brazil's state of Ceará has just introduced a new parenting designed to stimulate a stronger early childhood development.
Brazil's state of Ceará has just introduced a new parenting program designed to stimulate stronger early childhood development. (Photo: Julio Pantoja / World Bank)

Quality and innovative education policies emerge usually from a combination of factors such as good teachers, quality school management, and parental engagement, among others. In Brazil, a country with tremendous diversity and regional inequalities, good examples have emerged even when they are least expected. Ceará, a state in the northeast region of Brazil — where more than 500,000 children are living in rural areas and where poverty rates are high — is showing encouraging signs of success from innovative initiatives in education. The figures speak for themselves. Today, more than 70 of the 100 best schools in Brazil are in Ceará. 

The skills that matter in the race between education and technology

Harry A. Patrinos's picture
Also available in: 中文
Technology rapidly changes the workplace and the skills demanded, making current workers less employable. One approach is to think about the kind of work that technology cannot replace.
(Photo: Curt Carnemark / World Bank)
 


Depending on to whom you listen, automation, robotics, and artificial intelligence (AI) will either solve all our problems or end the human race. Sometime in the near future, machine intelligence is predicted to surpass human intelligence, a point in time known as “the singularity.” Whether the rise of the machines is an existential threat to mankind or not, I believe that there is a more mundane issue: robots are currently being used to automate production.

在教育与科技的竞赛中决定胜负的技能

Harry A. Patrinos's picture
Also available in: English
(Photo: Curt Carnemark / World Bank) 
 

自动化技术、机器人和人工智能要么能解决我们所有的问题,要么会终结全人类——从不同的人那里,你可能会听到不同的意见。
 
预计在不远的将来,机器的智能将会战胜人类,这一时点被称为“奇点”。而抛开机器的崛起对人类的威胁是否真实存在不说,还有一个更加实实在在的问题:机器人当前被大量用于自动化生产。
 
经济学家理查德·弗里曼(Richard Freeman)主张,机器人可以替代工人,甚至能替代高技能的专业人士。麻省理工学院(MIT)教授埃里克·布伦乔尔森(Erik Brynjolfsson)和安德鲁·麦克菲(Andrew McAfee)也指出,随着电脑变得更加强大,企业对某些工种的需求将会减少。

Early childhood as the foundation for tomorrow’s workforce

P. Scott Ozanus's picture

Also available in: Spanish

Scott Ozanus, guest blogger, is the Deputy Chairman and Chief Operating Officer at KPMG. He is also a member of the ReadyNation CEO Task Force on Early Childhood

Early childhood is key to a productive current workforce as well as nations’ future success. Photo: Arne Hoel / World Bank

Better workers.  Better communities.  Better lives for our citizens.
 
Why is a company that employs over 189,000 people around the world, and hires about 40,000 people every year, concerned with early childhood?
 
It’s because all over the globe, countries and companies face a common challenge: How best to strengthen their economy and workforce, while also taking societal concerns into consideration.  Early childhood is key to a productive current workforce as well as nations’ future success.

The power of art: A call to action on the Early Years

Dirk Wouters's picture
View a slideshow of photos by Lieve Blancquaert here

Ed’s note: This guest blog is by Dirk Wouters, Ambassador of the Kingdom of Belgium to the United States of America in Washington DC
 
A Kenyan mother seated in the hallway of a hospital, holding a newborn. She looks troubled, the baby has one thin arm up in the air. An Indian mother is resting after giving birth to twin girls. She already has two daughters at home. A Cambodian family looks to the future with hope as they take their newborn child back to their village. Nine babies, wrapped in colorful blankets, have been placed on a hospital bed in Kenya’s Pumwani hospital just after their birth. In this hospital, a 100 children are born every day.

Working on early childhood development in Mali

Daphna Berman's picture
An evaluation measuring the impact of daily micronutrient supplements combined with parent education on children’s development is underway. (Photo by:  Curt Carnemark / World Bank)

Natalie Roschnik was a newly minted graduate student when she accepted her first job with Save the Children in Mali. Nearly 20 years later, Roschnik knows Mali well: it’s one of the countries she travels to often as a Senior Research and Impact Advisor for Save the Children.

Five ways to improve parenting education in Indonesia

Heather Biggar Tomlinson's picture
A parenting education workshop is underway in Indonesia.

Ed's note: This guest blog is by Heather Biggar Tomlinson (Executive Director, Roshan Learning Center) and Syifa Andina (Chairperson, Foundation for Mother and Child Health)

There is a dynamic and growing energy in Indonesia focusing on parenting education, particularly for low-income families. However, little is known about parenting styles and related outcomes, much less the coverage and effectiveness of various parenting education approaches.

Measurement matters in preschool quality

Amer Hasan's picture
Children and teachers in an early childhood education center in rural Indonesia
Photo credit: Amer Hasan


Recent studies in neuroscience and economics show that early childhood experiences have a profound impact on brain development and thus on outcomes throughout life. A growing number of impact evaluations from low- and middle-income countries underscore the importance of preschool for children’s development (to highlight a few: Cambodia, Mozambique, and Indonesia).

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