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Ebola

School enrolment in Liberia is higher today than it was before the Ebola epidemic

Peter Darvas's picture
Also available in: Français
Post-Ebola recovery has been marked by a significant recovery and enrollment is up to the 2011 – 12 levels. (Photo credit: Katie Meyler/More Than Me)

In March 2014, Liberia announced that there were two suspected cases of Ebola in Lofa and Nimba counties. Six months later, Ebola had spread to 14 of the 15 counties of the country and a state of emergency had been declared. By the time the World Health Organization (WHO) announced that Liberia was officially ‘Ebola free’ in May 2015, more than 10,000 Liberians had contracted the virus and the economic fortunes of the post conflict nation had faced a significant downturn.

Les effectifs scolaires au Libéria sont aujourd’hui plus importants qu’avant l’épidémie d’Ebola

Peter Darvas's picture
Also available in: English
Le redressement du pays dans le sillage de l’épidémie d’Ebola s’est accompagné d’un net redressement des effectifs scolaires, qui ont renoué avec leur niveau de 2011–12 (Photo courtoisie de Katie Meyler / More Than Me)


En mars 2014, le Libéria faisait part de deux cas suspects de fièvre Ebola dans les comtés de Lofa et de Nimba. Six mois plus tard, l’épidémie touchait 14 des 15 comtés du pays et l’état d’urgence était déclaré. En mai 2015, lorsque l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) déclarait officiellement la fin de l’épidémie au Libéria, plus de 10 000 habitants avaient contracté le virus et l’économie de ce pays en situation d’après-conflit connaissait une forte récession.

The next generation of African scientists need a more sustainable career path

Rama George-Alleyne's picture
A professor teaching cell biology and biochemistry at a university in Africa. (Stephan Gladieu / World Bank)

Happy UN Day for South –South Cooperation!
 
Investment in skills is vital to economic growth and competitiveness and poverty reduction. I believe that there is no better way to do that than to educate young graduates with expertise in high-demand areas to help grow African economies, create jobs, and support research.

The impact of Ebola on education in Sierra Leone

Shawn Powers's picture
Also available in: Español
With the contribution of Kali Azzi-Huck, Anusha Ramakrishnan, and Yinan Zhang
A portrait of Selina Dougas, lost her old sister, Hawa Komo to Ebola, at the Cape Community Primary School in Freetown, Sierra Leone on June 22, 2015. Photo © Dominic Chavez/World Bank

The West Africa Ebola crisis of 2014-15 killed more than 11,000 people, caused economic and social disruption in a massive scale, and left tens of thousands of children orphaned. In Sierra Leone, schools were closed for eight months, resulting in a lost year of learning. With the closure of schools and banning of public gatherings, Sierra Leoneans, having lived through years of civil war, knew the setbacks that lost educational opportunities would inflict on a young generation.  The government, working with donor partners, initiated a number of interventions to mitigate these losses.

Reaching Children and Youth Stranded by the Ebola Crisis

Claudia Costin's picture
 
Children in the town of Gueckedou, Guinea, an area hard hit by the Ebola outbreak. Photo credits: ©afreecom/Idrissa Soumaré  EU/ECHO


​In a part of Sub-Saharan Africa where life is far from easy for most people, the Ebola epidemic is the most devastating event in a generation. With per capita incomes ranging between $400 and $700 a year, people living in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone can ill afford Ebola’s terrible toll on survival, health, and livelihoods. World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim was in West Africa last week to pledge our ongoing support to these countries to help them reach the goal of zero Ebola cases. 

More than 5 million children are out of school indefinitely due to the crisis, and the number is even larger if university-age students are taken into account.  But the crisis is not just the downtime for these millions of students of all ages affected by school and university closures. Its full magnitude is revealed in the loss of learning and the opportunities for progress that are forgone with each passing day.